Volume 15November 2019
PO Box 1216 •
7595 US Hwy 50 N
Lamar CO 81052-1216
719-336-9006 • 719-336-2402 Fax
Thank you to a long-time repeat customer:
Crowell Water Well Service, Inc.
Claude, Texas
SEMCO S6,000 Pump Hoist, 44’ derrick extension, hot shift PTO
automatic transmission, remote control, (2) pipe racks with
ratchet straps, sandreel 1500’ capacity, hydraulic oil cooler 12V DC,
(2) 96” toolboxes, 11’ steel flatbed, mounted on 2019 Ford F-550,
regular cab, 6.7L diesel, automatic, 4x4.
CALL OUR TOLL-FREE
NUMBER: 800-541-1562
SEMCO INC.
SEMCO INC.
E-mail: semcopumphoist@gmail.com
www.SEMCOoflamar.com
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NOVEMBER 2019
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NOVEMBER 2019
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Breaking News..................................................................13
Classified Section:
WorldWide SUPER MART
WorldWide SUPER MART..................57-72
Dealmakers.....................................................................8,39
Education Connection......................................................32
Fun Page............................................................................32
Hot Off the Press.................................................................9
Industry Announcements.................................................48
Obituary: Anderson, Jr., Joseph Prentiss “Andy”.........15
Obituary: Jenkins, Charles Curtis...................................15
Obituary: Pickens, Jr., Thomas Boone “T. Boone”........26
Obituary: Roth, Charles Thomas “Chuck”.....................15
Obituary: Wragg, Gregory G. “Greg”..............................15
Photo Gallery.................................................................31,47
Product Spotlight..............................................................22
Where are you planning to go?........................................36
Who’s in the News.............................................................13
WorldWide Association Memberships
WorldWide Association Memberships................................35
WorldWide Business Directory
WorldWide Business Directory.............................10,11,12
WorldWide
WorldWide
.........6
Editorial Focus for November - Gas and Oil
C&G
DIR
ENV
EXB
G&O
GEO
MIN
WTR
Acker Drill Company...........................................................30
Allegheny Instruments........................................................28
AMS, Inc...............................................................................7
Armstrong Machine Co., Inc. (AMCI)..................................26
Atlantic Screen & Manufacturing, Inc. (ASI)........................18
Baker Water Systems.........................................................33
B
aroid Industrial Drilling Products (IDP)…....…….…..........46
BESTOLIFE
®
Corporation...................................................25
Better Water Industries, Inc.................................................34
Bit Brokers International.....................................................41
Bitco, Inc.............................................................................36
Blackadar Insurance Agency...............................................17
Bloom Mfg., Inc...................................................................44
CONEXPO-CON/AGG
®
......................................................70
Drill King International.........................................................51
Drilling Equipment Sales, Inc. (DES)..................................72
Drilling Supply & Mfg (DSM)...............................................54
DRILLMAX
®
........................................................................71
Empire State Water Well Drillers Assoc. (ESWWDA) Ann. Mtg..50
Flomatic
®
Corporation.........................................................37
Foremost Industries............................................................69
GEFCO, Inc. (an Astec Industries Company).......................1
GeoPro, Inc.........................................................................55
Geoprobe Systems
®
............................................................19
Geothermal Supply Company, Inc. (GSC)..........................52
Hole Products.....................................................................21
Infinity Tool Manufacturing....................................................4
KS Bit, Inc.............................................................................3
Louisiana Ground Water Association (LGWA) Convention...20
Mills Machine Company, Inc...............................................16
Mobile Drill Intl....................................................................27
Mountain States Ground Water Expo.................................24
N&N Drilling Supply.............................................................56
Numa Hammers.................................................................43
Oklahoma Ground Water Assoc. (OGWA) Conference.......42
Palmer Bit Company...........................................................14
Proheat...............................................................................23
Rockmore International.........................................................9
SEMCO, Inc..........................................................................2
Star Iron Works, Inc............................................................48
Star Iron Works, Inc............................................................49
T&T Carbide, Inc.................................................................38
TDH Manufacturing Inc.......................................................29
Throop Rock Bit Company..................................................45
Underground Construction Technology (UCT) Conf……....13
Utah Ground Water Association (UGWA) Conf. and Expo..53
Well-Vu, Inc.........................................................................40
Wyo-Ben, Inc......................................................................15
Advertisers
Featured Editorial
C&G - Construction/Geotechnical
E
NV - Environmental
G&O - Shallow Gas and Oil
MIN - Mining
DIR - Horizontal Directional Drilling
E
XB - Exploration/Blasthole
GEO - Geothermal
W
TR - Water
Storkson, Britt: “Thinking Outside the Box”...............8
Determining the Correct Drill for Your Project............28
E-News Flash
E-News Flash
Readers Choice
Readers Choice: Constructing the.....33
Drilling in a Church....................................................39
Battersby, Mark E.: Drilling Into Money Not Boring..7
Using Geomagnetic Data to Improve MWD..............29
D-Geo Pipeline Software for Horizontal Directional..44
New San Andres Drilling Program.............................49
Kwader, Thomas: Environmental Monitoring...........17
From Coal to Solar: Nanticoke Solar.........................36
What’s the Big Deal about Carbon Capture..............45
Wire, Jeremy: Tales from the Field..........................50
What Happens to Old Gas and Oil Wells?.................55
Five Ways to Battle Insider Threats...........................21
Program in Canada Use Simulators for Blasthole.....34
Connor, Tim: Obstacles, Learning, & Creativity.......42
White, Harold: Oil/Water Exploration.......................53
Dispelling the Myths Surrounding Hydraulic Fracturing..22
Frequently-Used Geological Terms Part 85..............25
Oil Production Expands in the Sarqala Field.............39
Unique Pipe Provides Solution for Produced Water..56
America’s Underappreciated Energy Source............20
“Smith, Billy Bob”: The “Idiot’s” Corner..................24
Installation Provides Opportunity for Study...............40
Core Drilling Leads to A New Age of Energy Generation..47
Wilson, Jr., Robert Evans: The Un-Comfort Zone II...12,52
Demand for Queensland’s Coal Soars......................16
Mining Report from Germany...................................37
Rasmussen, Tim: Water For Life International........18
Could the Mojave Desert Help Solve California’s......31
Ballard, Thomas: Notes from the Groundwater Guy.....32
Kuebelbeck, Jim: Through the Back Door!..............41
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a
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Publish
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EO/
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Of
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Thomas Kwader Tim Rasmussen “Billy Bob Smith” Britt Storkson
Harold White Robert Evans Wilson, Jr. Jeremy Wire
Hyd/Eng Consultant:
Thomas Kwader, Ph.D.,P.G.
Consultant:
Mary Ann Pelletier
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Happy Thanksgiving to all . . .
Wow! Here it is, one of the happiest times of the year. I remember as a very small child, this was the
day we got to go have a HUGE early dinner at the “BIG” house. You see we lived in
an 8’ x 32’+/- mobile home. And boy was it mobile - didn’t take a huge anything to
pull it - but it was all we needed as it was full of love. So we got cleaned up - which
meant the big round metal tub outside for our baths. (No, I don’t make these things
up!)
Up we went to grandmom’s house (she actually was our step-grandmother) - we
got to dust the BIG furniture, and play up and down the stairway that used to be where the servants lived that led to the
kitchen. Oh how I remember that elegant table with everything in its proper place - we even got to set that table. We didn’t
get to have the wine - but we got the tomato juice. That was such a great, mem-
orable time for us. This place used to house and train race horses in times gone
by. I used to dream about owning that place. Oh well - not in my lifetime.
Now that you can see what my fond memories of Thanksgiving are - I’m
sure you can now look back and think about yours ~ enjoy the step back in
time.
See the Teamwork Football Players here? Some companies say they have
a “Team”, but in reality, they have a group of people working for them. A true
team consists of “Individuals commited to a group effort - that is what makes a
team work, a company work, a society work, and a civilization work.” Now you
are speaking of a real team - The
WWDR
WWDR Team!
From all of us here - to all of you there -
Happy Thanksgiving. Any way we can help you, please call.
We Will See you on the trail! NEXT STOPS - PA Blasting,
Kentucky Blasting, and VEGAS!
With pen
(computer) in hand
. . .
Ronnie, Managing
Publisher
r
onnie@worldwidedrillingresource.com
850-547-0102
Featured Articles for November
What Happens to
Old Gas and Oil Wells?
Page 55
New San Andres
Drilling Program
Page 49
Oil Production
Expands in Kurdistan
Page 39
Unique Pipe Provides
Solution for Produced Water
Page 56
Dispelling
the Myths of
Hydraulic
Fracturing
Page 22
Drilling Into Money Not Boring
b
y Mark E. Battersby
Records: They Could Save Your Business a Bundle
As many drilling professionals begin the onerous tax preparation process, they’re once again dis-
covering just how important good records are for tax savings. Good records can help every drilling busi-
ness generate an accurate tax bill and ward off zealous Internal Revenue Service (IRS) auditors.
Surprisingly, the IRS does not require a business keep records in any one manner. Federal income
tax laws require only that every business keep “complete and accurate records.” Just what records a
drilling business needs to keep, what records it should retain and for how long, is unclear, so long as they produce an accurate
accounting of income and expenses.
T
o help prepare future or amended returns, it makes sense to keep a copy of the business’s tax returns permanently. The
IRS suggests tax-related records be retained until the “period of limitations” expires for each year’s return.
Typically, the IRS can come after a business for failing to report income for up to six years after filing if the amount is
greater than 25% of the operation’s gross income. If a deduction was claimed for a bad debt or worthless security, the IRS
recommends retaining supporting tax records for seven years.
When it comes to employees, the
IRS recommends keeping payroll
records on hand for at least four years
in case of an audit. This should include
all wages, pension payments, tip infor-
mation, W-2 and W-4 forms, and any
other related information.
If the drilling operation works with
independent contractors or third parties,
it may also be necessary to meet some
state record keeping requirements.
Virginia, for example, requires contracts
with independent contractors be kept
for at least five years.
With business property, the IRS sug-
gests retaining records until the period
of limitations ends for the tax year when
the property was disposed of. These
records will aid in calculating deprecia-
tion, amortization, or depletion deduc-
tions - and for determining any eventual
gain or loss.
Above all, avoid checks made out to
cash. In fact, whenever possible, avoid
using cash. More claimed tax deductions
are disallowed for lack of substantiation
rather than for being nondeductible.
Consulting with an attorney or tax
professional can help guide every
drilling business to a legal and tax-com-
pliant record keeping policy. To avoid
identity theft and to protect sensitive
business information, all business
records should be disposed of properly
or shredded.
Mark
michele@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
7
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NOVEMBER 2019
Howard Hughes Sr. applied for a
U.S. patent for this invention in
1908. Maybe you’ve heard of it.
Find out on page 17!
“Thinking Outside the Box”
b
y Britt Storkson
Owner, P2FlowLLC
The above saying implies, among other things, that
sometimes unconventional approaches are the best solution
to a given problem, instead of “the way we’ve always done it”.
About the word convention”: I’m not talking about “a
convention, in the sense of a meeting, is a gathering of indi-
viduals who meet at an arranged place and time in order to discuss or engage in
some common interest.”
I mean: “A way in which something is usually done, especially within a partic-
ular area or activity.”
Convention is a common understanding of some thing or process. The word
“common” is important here because it should be, as close as possible, universally
understood. Like traffic light colors. Green is go, yellow comes before a red light,
and red is stop. One does not even need to be literate to understand this conven-
tion. It makes for near-instant comprehension, which is a good thing.
Language is largely the product of convention. It doesn’t matter how you say
something, as long as you are readily understood. The emphasis here should be
“immediate understanding”, not so much what the language is or isn’t. The univer-
sal language of air traffic control is English, not because it is a superior language,
but because it is the most commonly understood worldwide.
Sometimes accepted conventions can be a problem. The reason we have the
QWERTY typewriter keyboard is when typewriters first were invented, the makers
needed to slow the typists down because their crude (by today’s standards)
machines would jam. There have been several more efficient keyboard patterns
introduced over the years, but none have supplanted the QWERTY convention so far. Learning the new keyboard would
require considerable time and, with increased typing speed being the only advantage, most people conclude changing key-
boards isn’t worth the trouble.
When designing the computer controls human machine interface (HMI) part, it is always wise to use familiar and conven-
tional words, symbols, colors, and shapes wherever possible. Computers should conform to the operator, the operator should
not have to conform to the computer. The HMI part should be intuitive* enough so the average person can figure out much
of it even without any prior training. This doesn’t mean some training is not required, but the good controls designer makes
the system readily understood with a minimum of outside help.
*Intuitive: Using or based on what one feels to be true even without conscious reasoning; instinctive.
There is great profit in being “the first to market” and a “trendsetter” with a computer control system. It’s because if you
want to use their machine, you have to conform to their conventions, which may or may not be intuitive*. Often, they are pur-
posely not intuitive* because if they were simple and easy to use, we wouldn’t need the vendor. And the vendors often change
or “update” their software which, of course, requires more training and results in more billable hours for the vendor. “Updates”
can also introduce problems that were not there with the original software. So all of this amounts to computer operators
essentially becoming “slaves” to the computer and the computer vendor, instead of the computer being a “slave” to the oper-
ator.
While there’s nothing wrong with the pursuit of profit, there is a dark side to this scenario. What if the car you are driving
had the brake pedal relocated from the floor to a lever between the seats? Instead of pushing the pedal on the floor you had
to pull a lever between the front seats to apply the brakes. Most people would accept this change without much trouble until
an emergency situation came up: If a child ran out in front of the car, most people would instinctively “stomp on the brakes”.
They would not think about the lever relocation for at least several seconds and, by that time, it would be too late to avoid
serious injury or worse.
So while conventional changes may be necessary and even a good thing, they must not be taken lightly. I find it best to
ask the users what they would most comfortable with, not imposing my biases on
the user. If the users want the “stop” button to say “halt” instead of “stop,” I don’t
have any problem with it. The operators are using this thing, and they should have
the primary consideration when it comes to the computer controls system they are
expected to operate.
Britt
Britt Storkson may be contacted via e-mail to
michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
8
NOVEMBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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D
e
a
l
m
a
k
e
r
s
Matt and Joe with Acker Drill Company of
Scranton, Pennsylvania, thanking Eric (C)
w
ith Terra Testing, Inc. of Washington,
P
ennsylvania, for showing their new Acker
Renegade rig at the 2019 National Drilling
A
ssociation event.
Acker Drill Company
Send your deals to:
michele@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
January Issue Deadlines!
Space Reservation:
November 25
th
Display & Classified
Ad Copy: December 1
st
9
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NOVEMBER 2019
New Mineral with a Strange Chemical Signature Discovered in a Diamond
Nicole Meyer, a University of Alberta (Canada) student, discovered a new mineral inside a diamond. Named goldschmidtite
in honor of the founder of modern geochemistry Victor Moritz Goldschmidt, it has a curious chemical signature for a mineral
from the earth’s mantle.
“Goldschmidtite has high concentrations of niobium, potassium, and the rare
earth elements lanthanum and cerium, whereas the rest of the mantle is dominated
by other elements, such as magnesium and iron,” explained Meyer, a graduate
student in the Diamond Exploration Research and Training School, part of the
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada’s Collaborative
Research and Training Experience. “For potassium and niobium to constitute a
major proportion of this mineral, it must have formed under exceptional processes
that concentrated these unusual elements.”
Because it’s so difficult to access the mantle, scientists rely on tiny mineral inclusions within diamonds to learn more about
the chemistry deep beneath the earth’s surface.
Meyers said the work to find the new mineral wasn’t hers alone; it was an interdisciplinary collaboration with a mineralogist,
crystallographer, and her advisors.
“This discovery is the result of a lot of patient and meticulous work by Nicole and the research team,” said Graham Pearson,
Meyer’s co-supervisor. “Goldschmidtite is highly unusual for an inclusion captured by diamond, and gives us a snapshot of
fluid processes that affect the deep roots of continents during diamond formation. There have been several attempts to name
new minerals after Goldschmidt, but previous ones have been discredited. This one is here to stay.”
Image courtesy Nicole Meyer.
10
NOVEMBER 2019
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Think this
is it? Not so,
look on the next
page.
11
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NOVEMBER 2019
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To be noticed,
give us a call: (850) 547-0102
or e-mail: wwdr@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
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12 NOVEMBER 2019
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The Un-Comfort Zone II
by Robert Evans Wilson, Jr.
There Is No Such Thing as Greed
Three and a half years ago, in this column, I wrote an article titled: There’s No Such Thing as Being
Stubborn [May 2016,
WWDR
WWDR]. It has been one of my most controversial works, and most read. In it, I
stated that “stubborn” is a nonword like “greed.” I will now follow up and explain why I say the word
“greed” is phony.
Have you ever called someone greedy? Have you been accused of greed? Here is the definition of
GREED according to the American Heritage
®
Dictionary: noun. An excessive desire to acquire or possess more than what one
needs or deserves, especially with respect to material wealth.
Greed, then, is just desire with the added adjective - excessive. Wait a minute - isn’t this what we call ambition? So, who
determines what level of excessive desire becomes greed? Is it like U.S. Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart’s description
of hard-core pornography: “I’ll know it when I see it?That’s not only vague, it’s completely subjective, and a frightening standard
on which to determine the law of the land.
American Heritage goes on to say, “possess more than one needs.” Another subjective standard. Who determines how much
someone needs? Then it says, “possess more than one deserves.” Now we are getting somewhere. How can someone acquire
more than they deserve? No one is going to give someone more than they deserve. No one is going to pay more for something
than they think it’s worth. This means the person who gets more than they deserve must have done something ne-farious to get
it, such as swindling, extortion, cheating, or some other form of chicanery. In other words, greed boils down to one thing: theft.
But, you say, greed is the motivation behind stealing. I say, the reason people steal varies greatly. They might be hungry,
on drugs, unemployed, or not smart enough to get a job. I can’t read a person’s mind to determine why they steal, I can only
observe that they do.
If you call someone greedy, you are, in essence, calling them a thief. However,
if they haven’t stolen anything, then they have not taken more than they deserve.
Wilson cont’d on page 52.
13
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NOVEMBER 2019
January 28-30, 2020 Fort Worth, TX
UCT is the business event for everyone involved
in maintaining the underground utility pipe infra-
structure. The education program incorporates
trenchless and traditional (open-cut) technologies.
Sessions are taught by industry experts.
Immersive Learning
Earn Credit
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Send your Breaking News announcements to Bonnie@worldwidedrillingresource.com
WHOS IN THE NEWS
WHOS IN THE NEWS
The 2018 National Drilling Association
(NDA) Safety Awards were presented at the
recent NDA convention and the winners are:
Terra Testing, Inc.
SANO Drilling, Inc.
Pearson Drilling Company
Breaking News
Breaking News
Additional announcements
from NDA, BESTOLIFE
®
,
Eijkelkamp SonicSampDrill, Dakota
Bodies, Sandvik Mining and Rock
Technology USA, and Danos, are
located in our online issue at:
worldwidedrillingresource.com
Send your Who’s in the News to: bonnie@worldwidedrillingresource.com
DiedrichDrill.com
MilanSupply.com
14
NOVEMBER 2019
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In Memoriam
Joseph Prentiss Andy” Anderson, Jr. (1947~2019)
With heavy hearts, the South Atlantic JUBILEE said goodbye to Andy Anderson, who passed away
September 18, 2019. Born Joseph Prentiss Anderson, Jr. in Walterboro, South Carolina, Andy was a graduate
o
f St. Paul’s High School Class of 1965, then served in the U.S. Coast Guard. He was owner of Anderson
Well Drilling in Hollywood, South Carolina, a board member and past president of the South Carolina
Ground Water Association, and board member of the South Atlantic JUBILEE. He also served on the
Meggett Planning Commission for many years. A very active member of West Ashley Independent Baptist Church, Andy was
an elder and assistant treasurer. He loved being involved with his family.
Andy is survived by his wife Rose Marie; daughter Jeanie (Guillaume); son Joseph P. “Jody” Anderson, III (Natalya); grand-
children Joseph P. “Seph” Anderson, IV, and Collin; step-grandchildren Igor and Charlotte; and other extended family.
Charles Thomas “Chuck” Roth (1947~2019)
The
WWDR
WWDR Team was saddened to learn of the passing of Charles Thomas Chuck Roth of
Moultonborough, New Hampshire, on September 22, 2019, after a courageous battle with cancer.
Chuck spent his early years in Concord, Massachusetts, before moving to New Hampshire. He grad-
uated from Brewster Academy in Wolfeboro. As a child, he spent many summers in Gilmanton Iron Works.
He was owner and operater of Roth Artesian Well Drilling for over 49 years and took great pride in
taking care of his customers. He had both his fixed-wing and rotor pilot’s licenses and greatly enjoyed
flying his helicopter. He also loved snowmobiling.
Chuck is survived by his children Scott and Shannon; stepchildren Jason and Laura; several grand-
children; and his long-time companion Cynthia.
Gregory G. “Greg” Wragg (1954~2019)
Gregory G. “Greg” Wragg, passed away September 8, 2019, at his home in Ascutney, Vermont. He
was owner of Wragg Brothers Well Drilling with his brother Jay and brother-in-law Bruce. Greg’s passion
was his work. He also enjoyed riding his Harley motorcycle, mowing the lawn, and spending time with
family and friends - especially his “granddogs”.
Greg is survived by his daughter Kelly and son Ryan; his sisters Cheryl and Dedra (Bruce); his brother
Jay; and many nieces and nephews.
Charles Curtis Jenkins (1942~2019)
The New Jersey Ground Water Association sadly reported the loss of Charles Curtis Jenkins on September 18, 2019.
Born in Eccles, West Virginia, Charles moved to Browns Mills, New Jersey, when he was eight, and
thereafter considered himself a lifelong resident. He was owner/president of J. W. Jenkins & Sons Well
Drilling, Inc. and an
active volunteer at
community events.
He was also a mem-
ber of the Pemberton
Twp. Lions Club,
Ne w E g y p t E l k s , a n d t h e M o o s e
Organization.
Husband of the late Dona Jenkins,
Charles is survived by sons Duane,
Todd (Stacy), Bryan (Melinda), and grand-
children Colby, Lola, Zachary, and Sydney.
The
WWDR
WWDR management and staff
extend their sincere condolences to these
water well industry veteransfamilies,
friends, and former colleagues.
Lest we forget...
15
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NOVEMBER 2019
16
NOVEMBER 2019
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Demand for Queensland’s Coal Soars
Adapted from Information by the Queensland Resources Council and the Queensland Government
According to the Queensland Resources Council (QRC) in Australia, coal remains Queensland’s biggest export, making
up 40% of the state’s total exports. This high-quality coal is in great demand from Asia and the state’s economy is benefiting
from key trade links with growing economies making coal the central commodity driving exports.
QRC Chief Executive Ian Macfarlane said, “Queensland has an advantage over other states with its close proximity to the
economies of China, India, and Japan. Every quarter we see export data repeating a common theme - the world needs our
metallurgical coal to make steel needed for building modern cities, and our high-quality thermal coal is delivering tomorrow’s
energy needs through high-efficiency, low-emission coal-fired power plants.”
Coal supports more than 215,000 jobs in Queensland and coal exports contributed $36.3 billion to the state’s economy
last year. The resources sector, including minerals, liquified natural gas, coal, and alumina, made up $68.2 billion in total, which
helped Queensland post a record $84.3 billion in exports.
The state recently approved a new coal mine, the Olive Downs mine near Moranbah in central Queensland, which is ex-
pected to create more jobs, coal, and royalties during the mine’s 79-year life. Five hundred jobs are anticipated during con-
struction and 1000 jobs once the mine is operational. The project will include coal handling and crushing facilities at the mine’s
Olive Downs South and Willunga precincts, a rail link to transport coal to the Dalrymple Bay Coal Terminal, a water pipeline,
and power transmission line. Construction is scheduled to begin next year.
“Demand for Queensland coal is very strong. Overseas demand means we are expected to once again sell more than
[220 million tons] of coal,” Macfarlane stated.
M
I
N
Environmental Monitoring
b
y Thomas Kwader, Ph.D., P.G.
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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®
Hydrogeologist
Losing Circulation - Usually a Bad Sign
Drilling using circulating fluids has been around for a very long time. Drilling with fluids (mud) allows
us to drill to deep depths and drill large-diameter holes without worrying about a collapse, as long as the
hole is filled with the proper drilling fluid.
Drilling with the proper drilling fluid facilitates the circulation of “mud” to lift the cuttings out of the bore-
hole and “drop” them in a mud pit as the velocity slows down in a “wider” section of the drilling circulation system. The cuttings
settling out in the mud pit are occasionally cleaned out of the pit as the drill bit advances deeper. Circulating fluids have other
benefits, such as keeping the temperature down at the drill bit, retrieving fresh drill cuttings to the surface that reveals the type
of strata being penetrated, and minimizing friction between the drill bit and rod within the borehole. The “weight” and velocity
of the drilling fluid also help lift the cuttings dislodged by the drill bit.
If the drill bit encounters a cavity of a very porous and permeable material, the weight of the drill fluid column may begin to
flow rapidly into the porous borehole wall.
This can develop quickly into a serious
situation for the drill operator and drilling
rig.
Prior to losing circulation, a positive
pressure kept the borehole wide open
and stable. The sudden loss of pres-
sure into the formation or cavity could
allow the borehole and formation near
the bit to collapse and create a void or
depression at the borehole. Even the
most experienced drill operator will be
torn between running away from the
drilling rig and borehole, or to try and
stay with the rig and save the borehole
by increasing the volume of drill mud
headed down the borehole.
At the time the lost circulation first
occurs, there is no way to determine
the size or extent of the events about to
follow. I personally know of at least six
drill operators who were unfortunately
taken to a depth below ground level
and smothered by sediment and soil
falling on top of them.
Prevention techniques include: 1)
Building a wide base or platform beneath
the back of the rig to spread the rig’s
weight over a wider area; 2) Watching
closely for the onset of lost circulation
and cease drilling immediately, and if it
can be done safely, disconnect the last
drill rod from the kelly or tophead drive
and move the rig off the hole.
Tom
Tom Kwader may be contacted
via e-mail to michele@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
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NOVEMBER 2019
E
N
V
On November 20, 1908, Howard
Hughes Sr. applied for a patent for
his dual-roller bit, which improved
rotary drilling.
by Tim Rasmussen
Water For Life sends containers of equipment and medical supplies to Guatemala each year.
The containers are imported in the name of Agua Para La Vida (APV), our nonprofit sister corpo-
r
ation registered in Guatemala. We must make sure APV is in compliance with all the legal rules
in Guatemala, so there will be no issue when the container hits the port. We have a lawyer in Guatemala City who assists us
with government requirements, and I needed to visit him to make sure everything was ready for the container this fall.
After three flights, including an all-night flight from LAX and a short four hours in a hotel near the airport, I took a TAG
airlines flight to Flores, Guatemala. The plane was an Embraer 110 Bandeirante. This is a 12- to
18-passenger twin engine plane that has been in production about 50 years. There were five of us
onboard, and no door between passengers and pilots. I sat in the front seat and had a good view
of the cockpit procedures; it was very interesting. The ride was bumpy, but uneventful.
The heat and humidity in Petén hit like a wall as I got off the plane. My bag was unloaded
immediately and I was relieved to get in the truck and start the trip to our headquarters in Poptun.
The breeze through the truck window was a relief.
The following day, I had meetings with our SAT accountant (SAT is Guatemala’s version of the
U.S. Internal Revenue Service). He reported he was satisfied we are in compliance with the gov-
ernment regulations and all was in order. Then, I went to a meeting with Dr. Mendez of the Ministry of
Health in Petén. He was happy to hear a container was coming with medical equipment and said he
knew of a couple of villages where there was a great need. I told him we would try to get to them.
I spent the afternoon with Berny going to nearby villages to check on a few pumps. One well is in a beautiful village called
Las Cruses. The people there speak only Q’eqchi’ so communication was difficult, but we found a lady who spoke some
English and she was very helpful. We gave her, a friend, and children a ride to Poptun to the market. They enjoyed the trip
in the truck.
After one more day in Poptun, we needed to go back to Guatemala City for the appoint-
ment with the lawyer. I was treated to a torrential rainfall that night and worried our flight
would be in the rain, but as we got the truck out of
the shop, the rain stopped and we drove to Flores,
then flew back to Guatemala City. This time, Berny
was with me and we took a cab to the hotel.
The appointment at the lawyer’s office was
set for 10 a.m. the following day. Berny picked me
up at the hotel at 9. For about 30 minutes, Berny
wove through streets, making a turn every two or
three blocks. I could never have navigated my
way back to the hotel.
The visit took about 30 minutes. I provided him an authorization for our APV
president, Henry Lazaro, to conduct the business of Water For Life USA in
Guatemala, and he questioned me carefully about our compliance with SAT regu-
lations. He was happy I could report I had just visited with SAT and all was in order
with them. He advised us the corporate status of APV was good and instructed us
to have an APV board meeting as soon as possible and to send him a copy of the
minutes of the meeting signed by the treasurer and president.
I had an 8 a.m. flight back to LAX and wanted to leave in plenty of time
because dealing with traffic in Guatemala City is a serious test of patience. There
are certain times of day when you are better off just to stay wherever you are. What
is normally a 15-minute trip from the hotel to the airport at 5 a.m. becomes a 30-
minute trip at 5:30, and by 6:30, probably an hour and a half, if there are no accidents!
If there is an accident, there’s no telling what will happen or when you will arrive.
The following day, I left the hotel early enough to have a fast trip to the airport,
then three flights back to the good old USA. There is nothing like seeing how it is there
to make one realize how good it is here. It is a perspective everyone should gain.
If you would like to help, contact Gary Bartholomew at 509-466-5075 or 509-939-1941
Tim
Tim Rasmussen may be contacted via e-mail to
michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
W
T
R
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NOVEMBER 2019
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19NOVEMBER 2019
When it comes to supplying the country with reliable, renewable energy, geothermal technology is a great solution for the
United States, but due to technical and nontechnical issues, only a fraction of its potential has been realized.
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) recently participated in a multiyear re-
search collaboration with national laboratories, industry experts, and academics to assess ways to increase geothermal energy
deployment through technological improvements, reducing costs, and mitigating barriers. The analysis also assessed the eco-
nomic benefits to the U.S. geothermal industry and potential environmental impacts of increased deployment - including jobs,
consumer energy prices, water use, and air quality - and investigated opportunities for desalination, mineral recovery, and hy-
bridization with other energy technologies for greater efficiencies and lower costs.
The study, GeoVision: Harnessing the Heat Beneath Our Feet includes a road map of items which can help the industry
move toward widespread implementation. The GeoVision analysis reveals the unique characteristics of geothermal energy
and its unrealized potential, including:
j Nationwide energy applications through unique capabilities in electricity generation, as well as residential, commercial,
and district heating and cooling
j Ready-to-use commercial technologies, augmented by developing technologies with vast potential for increased elec-
tricity generation and direct-use applications
j Job impacts
j Revenue potential for federal, state, and local stakeholders, as well as royalty potential for leaseholders.
The analysis also used a suite of modeling tools and scenarios to evaluate the performance of geothermal technologies
relative to other energy technologies. The analyses included evaluating the potential role of existing and future geothermal
deployment in both the electric sector and the heating and cooling sector, as well as unconventional geothermal resources
like enhanced geothermal systems, or EGS. In the heating and cooling sector, the analysis modeled geothermal heat pumps
(GHPs), which are also known as ground source heat pumps, and distric heating systems (using both conventional and EGS
resources).
Key findings of the analysis include technology improvements which could reduce costs and increase geothermal electric
power deployment. Improving the tools,
technologies, and methodologies used to
explore, discover, access, and manage
geothermal resources could reduce both
the costs and risks associated with geo-
thermal developments which could poten-
tially increase geothermal power generation
by 2050. Additionally, the analysis sug-
gests improving permitting timelines could
be another step in reducing the costs asso-
ciated with geothermal project development,
potentially doubling installed geothermal
capacity within the same time frame.
Americas Underappreciated Energy Source
Adapted from Information by the U.S. Department of Energy
GE
O
Sunset over the DOE geothermal test site in Fallon, Nevada. Photo by Dick Benoit courtesy of the U.S. Department of Energy.
Information: Joel Walton
jwalton022@aol.com • (225) 744-4554
www.lgwa.org
January 9, 2020
Paragon Casino - Marksville, LA
Tower or Atrium hotel rooms call (800) 642-7777 and refer to
LGWA Annual 2020 conference use code
LGWA 01G
Registration starts at 7 am, Seminars start at 8 am
(Cocktail hour, dinner, and BINGO at 6 pm
the night before the convention [the 8th].)
LLoouuiissiiaannaa GGrroouunndd WWaatteerr AAssssoocciiaattiioonn
LLoouuiissiiaannaa GGrroouunndd WWaatteerr AAssssoocciiaattiioonn
CCoonnvveennttiioonn && TTrraaddee SShhooww
CCoonnvveennttiioonn && TTrraaddee SShhooww
20
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A four-year old asks an
average of 437 questions a day.
21
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NOVEMBER 2019
Five Ways to Battle Insider Threats
A
dapted from Information by CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020
A recent study on insider threats offered some shocking information. The study indicated how compromising an insider is
a lot easier for your rival than actually breaking in from the outside, and attention to this problem is well below where it should
be.
While 40% of those surveyed rated insider threat as the most damaging, nearly the same percentage (38%) said they
don’t have a way to detect insider threats. What’s worse, roughly 20% don’t have a plan in place to mitigate damage from this
type of incident.
There are some fairly simple ways to protect your company from both malicious and unintentional insiders, including:
1 - Controlling or eliminating e-mail attachments and links. E-mails are the
number one way for outsiders to attack companies in today’s digital era.
Although the message itself isnt dangerous, links and attachments are.
Several security companies offer malware assessment of links and attach-
ments. Suspicious attachments are quarantined and dangerous links are dis-
abled.
2. Properly manage and control access to data and critical systems. Work with
your human resources team and business managers to understand employee
roles and the type of data access they need to do their jobs. Then, assign only
the necessary access level, no more.
3. Know where your data is. An important issue is to know where critical and sensitive data is located in your system so
it can be locked down when necessary. If you don’t know where this information is, how can you protect it?
4. Monitor employee behavior and look for irregularities, including action monitoring software. It’s not intrusive to look for
excessive data dumps or repeated attempts to look at files or directories which are not permitted - it’s good business.
Educate employees to be on the lookout for behavioral changes in coworkers.
5. Raise security awareness. Lastly, but perhaps more importantly, is the need for security awareness training. This
should be an essential part of your company’s culture - not an afterthought or checklist item. Companies partnering with
their employees to ensure security awareness do better than those which force compliance, or simply perform training to
check a box.
Although most attacks may come from outside your organization, the most serious damage is done by insiders with
unchecked access to your information.
22
NOVEMBER 2019
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Baroid Industrial Drilling Products new MAX-YIELD™ is a one-to-one ratio geo-
thermal system that can reduce logistics, transportation, and handling costs compared
to traditional grout designs that use two or more sacks of grout to a single bag of
thermally conductive media.
MAX-YIELD™ provides a stable grout with low permeability and
e
nhanced subsurface heat transfer in ground source heat loops. It
is easily mixed and pumped in a uniform slurry, and meets solids
content of >20% solids.
To adjust thermal conductivity, simply adjust the volume of makeup
water used.
Baroid Industrial Drilling Products is a Valued
WWDR
WWDR Advertiser.
Dispelling the Myths Surrounding
Hydraulic Fracturing Part 1
Adapted from a Policy Brief by The Heartland Institute
Hydraulic fracturing is a method to help extract natural gas and oil located several miles beneath the earth’s surface. Over
the past decade, this process has increased the output of natural gas by 40% and oil produc-
tion by 85%. Additionally, the hydraulic fracturing industry now supports nearly three million
U.S. jobs.
Unfortunately, its well-documented success has gone unnoticed and is not appreciated
by the public. In fact, the process has been demonized and is often attacked by lawmakers
because of false claims by opponents. In this series of articles, we will take a look at the most
popular myths about hydraulic fracturing and take a look at, and review the facts.
Myth #1 - Hydraulic Fracturing Pollutes Our Water - Perhaps one of the most preva-
lent myths, this claim was spurred by a video of a man in Colorado lighting the water from his
home faucet on fire. Not only was it scary to watch, it also had a powerful impact on the public.
However, when scientists examined the case a little closer, the facts told a different story. The
Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission tested the man’s water and, by analyzing
the istopic composition of the gas, they were able to determine the source of the methane
present in his water. It turns out, biogenic, naturally occurring methane was the culprit, not
hydraulic fracturing. In fact, the water well did not test positive for any of the chemicals used
in the fracturing process.
Since 2010, there have been more than two dozen peer-reviewed studies and assess-
ments, all showing hydraulic fracturing is not a significant threat to groundwater sources, in-
cluding drinking water.
Perhaps the most compelling piece of evidence is the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency study released in 2016. This $29 million project studied the impacts on groundwater
by 110,000 hydraulically fractured wells across the country since 2011. The six-year report
concluded: “Hydraulic fracturing operations are unlikely to generate sufficient pressure to
drive fluids into shallow drinking water zones.”
Why is hydraulic fracturing unlikely to contaminate groundwater sources? During the frac-
turing process, fissures located thousands of feet below the water table are opened by pump-
ing fluid solutions at high pressures, forming small fractures in the rock. Proppants, mostly
sand, are pumped into the fissures to prevent them from closing. While the hydraulic pressure
is enough to crack the rock, it is not enough to send fluid up through multiple rock formations,
where drinking water zones are located.
It’s also important to remember, drill operators don’t want water in their gas and oil wells.
Water intrusion could change the drilling mud weight and lead to disaster. Drilling mud helps
maintain stable pressures underground, lubricates the bit, and brings cuttings to the surface.
If water gets into the well, the mud weight changes, which in turn, causes the pressure at the bottom of the well to change. If
not brought under control, the insufficient mud weight could cause a blowout.
We’ll dive into Myth #2 next month.
G
&
O
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NOVEMBER 2019
February 6 - 7, 2020
Aquarius Casino Resort - Laughlin, NV
Located on the Colorado River
For more information visit us online: mountainstatesgroundwater.com
E-mail: info@mountainstatesgroundwater.com
(480) 609-3993
WHY ATTEND???
•Its a great opportunity to visit with manufacturers &
suppliers, drilling contractors & pump installers, technical
& consulting firms, state groundwater officials, etc.
Attend the seminars
• Visit the exhibits
• Earn CEU’s
Participate in the Buck Lively Scholarship Auction & Raffle
No membership is required to attend – Everyone is welcome!
It’s casual & inexpensive: Bring your employees!
24
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The “Idiots” Corner
b
y “Billy Bob Smith”
This has been on my mind for longer than I
care to admit - stuff other people do, say, believe,
etc. that I just don’t get, can’t stand, or drives me nuts. Yes, yes, I
get it - I have my quirks just like everyone reading this article, but I
ask you - do you think some other people’s quirks are worse, more
difficult, more idiotic than some of your own? First, here’s a couple
of quotes [in the boxes] from a few famous people - yes, I am including myself in that cat-
egory. Now, the following is a very short list of just some of the quirks friends, relatives,
kids, customers, or bosses have had over the years:
You bite your fingernails/pick your nose. You hate the overuse of the word “like”.
You chew with your mouth open. You hate gum “crackers”.
The more people there are, the more quiet you are.
You get extremely defensive when someone disagrees with you.
You overexaggerate when telling stories of your past deeds. You hate your neighbors’ barking dogs.
Whenever you cry, you try to catch the tears with your tongue. You get upset when kids act up in a public place.
You panic when you are suddenly put into the spotlight. You adjust your glasses when you’re nervous.
You cannot stand the sound of people snapping their fingers.
You’re extremely conscious of proper posture and you’re constantly standing or sitting up straight.
You absolutely REFUSE to sleep without a trinket of some kind (a blanket, stuffed animal, pillow, etc.).
Every time you sit near a candle, you try your best to put it out with your fingers and are rarely successful.
You are embarrassed by the sound of your laugh, and use all your willpower to not let a single giggle escape.
You just can’t stop talking about your preferences - you always have to give your opinion, even total strangers.
You never look directly into someone’s eyes, instead gazing slightly to the right or left of their face when speaking to them.
You always need to look cool. You obsessively map out dramatic entrances, witty one-liners, and elaborate combat moves.
You zone out when another takes longer than five seconds to explain something, but pretend to have understood it perfectly.
Okay, now it’s time for you to create a personal list of your quirks. Want to make it a real fun experiment? Share your list
with a spouse, significant other, or boss, then ask for their reaction.
Billy Bob Contact him via e-mail to michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
However my parents - both of whom came from im-
poverished backgrounds and neither of whom had
been to college, took the view that my overactive imag-
ination was an amusing quirk that would never pay a
mortgage or secure a pension.”
J. K. Rowling
“Be happy with being you. Love
your flaws. Own your quirks. And
know that you are just as perfect as
a
nyone else, exactly as you are.”
Ariana Grande
“Everyone is quirky in their own
unique way. The question is - can
we accept other’s quirks as okay,
a
s we expect others to accept ours
as okay?”
Billy Bob
Frequently-Used
Geological Terms
Part 85
G
lossary Adapted from the
Dictionary of Geological Terms
R
Rock Salt - Coarsely crystalline halite
occurring as a massive or granular
aggregate, and constituting a nearly
pure sedimentary rock which may occur
in domes, plugs, or as extensive beds
resulting from the evaporation of saline
water. Also refers to artificially prepared
salt in the form of large crystals or
masses.
Rockslide - The downward and usually
rapid movement of newly detached seg-
ments of bedrock, sliding on a surface
of bedding, jointing, or faulting. The
moving mass usually breaks up into
several small pieces.
Roof - Rock lying above a coal bed or the back above an ore body. Also used to describe rock bordering the upper surface
of an igneous intrusion.
Roof Pendant - A downward projection of native rock into an igneous intrusion.
Roof Rock - A shale or other impervious rock which acts as a barrier to the movement of gas or oil. It overlies a reservoir rock
to form a trap.
Room and Pillar - A form of mining where the ore is mined in rooms separated by pillars of undisturbed rock left as roof support.
Rose Quartz - Quarts with a rose-pink color, used as a gem or an ornamental stone.
Rosette - A radially symmetrical, sand-filled crystalline aggregate
or cluster which resembles a rose, formed in sedimentary rocks by
barite, marcasite, or pyrite.
Rotary Drilling - The main method of drilling deep wells, especial-
ly gas and oil wells. A hard-toothed drill bit at the bottom of rotating
drill pipe grinds a hole in the rock. Lubrication and cooling are pro-
vided by continuously circulating drilling mud, which also brings
well cuttings to the surface.
Rotary Table - In rotary drilling, a power-driven circular platform
on the derrick floor which rotates the kelly, drill pipe, and drill bit. It
is sometimes used as the zero depth reference for downhole
measurements.
Rubellite - A pale rose red to deep ruby red transparent lithian
variety of tourmaline, used as a gemstone.
Ruby - Red variety of corundum containing small amounts of
chromium, used as a gemstone.
Rudaceous - A sedimentary rock composed of a significant
amount of fragments coarser than sand grains; pertaining to a rudite. Also said of the texture of such a rock.
Rudite - A general name used for consolidated sedimentary rocks composed of rounded or angu-
lar fragments coarser than sand, such as granules, pebbles, cobbles, boulders, and gravel.
Run-of-mine - Said of ore in its natural, unprocessed state; pertaining to ore just as it is mined.
Rutilated Quartz - Quartz characterized by the presence of enclosed needlelike crystals of rutile.
Rutile - A reddish-brown tetragonal mineral. It is trimorphous with anatase and brookite, and
often contains a little iron. Rutile forms prismatic crystals in other minerals; it occurs as a primary
mineral in some acid igneous rocks, metamorphic rocks, and as residual grains in beach sands.
It is an ore of titanium.
R Wave - Stands for Rayleigh Wave which is a type of surface wave having a retrograde, elliptical
motion at the free surface.
25
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NOVEMBER 2019
Visit us at NGWA Booth 1425
Visit us at UCT Ft Worth Booth 801
Steve Wageman Global Industrial Sales: swageman@bestolife.com
WHAT ALL THE BUZZ IS ABOUT!
F
or more than 80 years, BESTOLIFE
®
p
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26
NOVEMBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
In Memoriam
Thomas Boone “T. Boone” Pickens, Jr. (
1928 – 2019)
Born in Holdenville, Oklahoma, May 22, 1928, Thomas Boone “T. Boone” Pickens, Jr. was the
son of an oil landman. When he was young, his family moved to Amarillo, Texas, where he grew
up and attended high school. After one year at Texas A&M University, he transferred to Oklahoma
A&M (now Oklahoma State University), where he earned a degree in geology in 1951. Pickens
worked for Phillips Petroleum for three years before striking out on his own in 1954. With $2500
of borrowed money, Pickens and two investors formed an oil and gas firm called Petroleum
Exploration Inc., as well as another company Altair Oil & Gas Co., to pursue oil and gas exploration opportunities in western
Canada. Then he established Mesa Petroleum, which he took public in 1964. Pickens turned Mesa into one of America’s
largest independent natural gas and oil companies with the company producing more than 3 trillion cubic feet of gas and 150
million barrels of oil between 1964 - 1996. He was an advocate for energy independence in the U.S.
This self-made oil tycoon never forgot his humble beginnings, he said, “For most of my adult life, I’ve believed that I was put
on earth to make money and be generous with it. I’ve never been a fan of inherited wealth.” He gave more than one billion dollars
to philanthropic and educational causes including his alma mater Oklahoma State University, the University of Texas Southwestern
Medical Center, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at
Dallas, Scottish Rite Children’s Hospital, the T. Boone Pickens Hospice and Palliative Care Center, the Wilmer Eye Institute at
Johns Hopkins University, Big Brothers Big Sisters of North Texas, the Center for Missing and Exploited Children, the Fisher House
Foundation, Happy Hill Farm, Jonathan’s Place, Meals on Wheels, the World Cranial Foundation, The Senior Source, USO
Dallas/Fort Worth, Special Olympics of Texas, and Jubilee Park (an inner-city Dallas community).
He penned a letter to be published after his death (it’s inspiring and worth reading on LinkedIn.com
) which offers sage
advice and insight into what he believed were the keys to his success including, a good work ethic; learning from your mistakes; being
humble; embracing change; having faith in spiritual matters and in humanity; staying fit; and not blaming others when you fail.
He ends his letter with this, I left an undying love for America, and the hope it presents for all. I left a passion for entrepreneurship,
and the promise it sustains. I left the belief that future generations can and will do better than my own. Thank you. It’s time we
all move on.”
T. Boone Pickens passed away on September 11, of natural causes. He is survived by his children Deborah, Pam, Michael,
Tom, and Liz, as well as 11 grandchildren, and an increasing number of great grandchildren. The T. Boone Pickens Foundation
will continue to support the many charitable endeavors he embraced during his life.
27
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
NOVEMBER 2019
Determining the Correct
Drill for Your Project
Adapted from Information by the
Association of Equipment
M
anufacturers
Drill rigs are used in a wide variety
of applications. Among them, construc-
tion drill rigs are high-performance,
technologically advanced, and well-suit-
ed for multiple applications.
Larger drill rigs are used for mining,
exploration, geotechnical, and construc-
tion projects. They can also be used to
drill wells (water, oil, and natural gas),
sample subsurface materials, and install
subsurface fabrications, such as under-
ground utilities. According to Jeff Calow,
technical sales representative, foundation
and surface drilling for Selix Equipment,
a dealer for both Soilmec and Sandvik
drills, In a shoring or caisson installa-
tion scenario, depth, diameter, and the necessity for segmental casing to line the hole will dictate the size and type of the
machine. Larger diameter and deeper holes will require larger machines with greater torque and larger winch capacities,
allowing a greater amount of material to be extracted from the shaft.”
Smaller machines are often chosen for limited-access projects and offer decreased mobilization costs, better more efficient
fuel consumption, and a smaller labor force. “Access is of course always a consideration as a machine physically fitting on a
jobsite is only half the battle - you often need a greater lay down area available on-site for the assembly and disassembly of
the machine,” stated Calow.
Drills are engineered in one of two different configurations: rotary and percussion. Percussion is used to hit rock which is
too hard to put an auger through. Augers pull the earth out as you are drilling, which is great in soft soil, but once you hit harder
materials, you will need a percussion drill.
Rotary drill systems use a lower rotary drive to advance casing through unconsolidated overburden and, where applicable,
socket the casing into bedrock. The drill string is equipped with either a down-the-hole (DTH) hammer or a rotary bit to remove
material and bring it to the surface.
There are also several drilling head options to consider. The application and material being drilled will determine which is
best for your project. “If it is hard rock or soft rock, does it have clay in it? This will determine the flushing characteristics and
the type of carbide used,” said Wes Vietmeier, business line manager underground drills, Sandvik Mining and Rock Technology.
“Also, the type of drilling equipment the customer has will be a factor: percussion drilling, DTH, top hammer, rotary, or auger
drilling. The drilling depth and hole size will also affect the choice of bits.”
For foundation drilling, the most popular construction application for a drill, there are five categories of drill heads:
Earth/Soil Augers - Used in softer ground conditions, such as clay, sand, or till, earth augers have a spade-style tooth,
similar to what an excavator bucket uses.
Rock Augers - This style of auger uses a bullet-style round shank carbide
tooth for drilling in harder ground conditions, typically when conditions exceed
the hardness of clay.
Core Barrels - Core barrels also use a bullet-style round shank carbide tooth,
but occasionally they can be found using pin-on or weld-on carbide bars/teeth.
This is used when an obstruction cannot be passed up the flights of a standard
auger, or the obstruction is simply too large and must be cored through. Core
barrels pickup where rock augers leave off.
Drilling Buckets - Available in earth (spade teeth), rock (bullet teeth), and
cleanout designs (flat edge), drilling buckets work either as a centrifugal bucket
with a swinging door plate on the bottom or as a double-action centrifugal with a plunger actuated fall away door plate on
the bottom. Drilling buckets are used to excavate material when the shaft is saturated in water, or when drilling with sus-
pension slurries or polymers.
Continuous Flight Auger (CFA) - This auger is actually designed to drill the entire length of the hole in one shot. The
stem of the auger is hollow with a port on the bottom of the auger, which allows concrete to be pumped through the auger
when the desired depth is achieved. This creates a stable shaft, as material is only removed during the concreting phase.
CFA does not work in hard rock or in earth containing numerous obstructions.
By knowing the features of each kind of drill, as well as work site drilling conditions, you can choose a drill which is best
for your specific construction site.
28
NOVEMBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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®
C
&
G
Quality Built from Experience
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www.tdhmfg.com
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29
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
NOVEMBER 2019
Using Geomagnetic Data to Improve MWD Operations
Adapted from Information by CGG
Based in France, CGG is a geoscience company which collects, processes, and interprets geophysical data and provides
advice to clients in the mineral, gas and oil, engineering, and environmental management industries, based on the results.
Recently, the company announced the availability of precalculated MagCube™ in-field referencing (IFR) models for meas-
urement while drilling (MWD) surveys over seven U.S. onshore basins and plays: Bakken, Eagle Ford, Haynesville, Marcellus,
Niobrara, Permian, and Woodford.
CGG’s MagCube magnetic referencing system combines a
global geomagnetic reference model with local magnetic survey
data to deliver declination (dip), inclination, and total field values
at depth. These cubes of subsurface vector magnetic field infor-
mation will help with MWD surveys for directional drilling.
Accurately knowing a well’s trajectory while the well is still being
drilled could save costly sidetracks, and even prevent collisions
with other wells in tightly drilled shale plays. The MagCube models
include an estimation of positional uncertainties, allowing clients
to design more closely spaced drilling programs.
As laterals get longer and the development of stacked reser-
voirs becomes more common onshore, well paths are getting
smaller. The smaller the target, the more important it is to know
where the wellbore is in real-time. It also eliminates costly rig time
to run separate post-drilling gyroscopic surveys.
According to Greg Paleolog, senior vice president for CGG
Multi-Physics, the IFR tool is a great example of working closely with drilling companies, as well as gas and oil producers, to
create the best geomagnetic models of the most prolific onshore U.S. unconventional basins. It’s cost-effective and timely,
which significantly reduces drilling uncertainties and costs. “With the adoption and application of geomagnetic technology to
downstream oil and gas drilling, CGG is taking the lead once again to meet client business needs in a very important and
expanding market segment,” he stated.
D
IR
30
NOVEMBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
Could the Mojave Desert Help Solve California’s Water Problem?
Compiled by Editorial Staff,
Worldwide Drilling Resource
Worldwide Drilling Resource
®
®
An aquifer beneath the Mojave Desert may have the ability to provide water to 100,000 households in drought-stricken
California for the next half-century. Whether to tap it on a commercial scale or leave it alone is a decades-old question the
T
rump administration has revived and the California Legislature is reconsidering. The Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery,
and Storage Project aims to conserve billions of gallons of water lost annually to high salinity and evaporation in the eastern
Mojave Desert and create a new, reliable water supply and groundwater storage for Southern California.
Rain and snowmelt from the New York and Providence mountain ranges winds through porous ground, skirting less per-
meable volcanic rock on its way. The groundwater’s natural flow takes it downhill through the aquifer system over hundreds of
years. It ultimately reaches the dry lakes at the base of the watershed, where it becomes highly saline and evaporates through
the surface. The aquifer is roughly the size of Rhode Island, and is located in the Fenner Basin, which is in the Cadiz Valley of
California. Research indicates more than 20 million acre-feet
of water is currently stored in the alluvium beneath the proj-
ect area, as much as is stored in Lake Mead - the nation’s
largest surface reservoir. Even more water is thought to be
stored further underground in carbonate rock layers.
The water rights belong to a private company - Cadiz
Inc. The company wants to draw water from the ground,
pump it east through a proposed 43-mile pipeline to the
Colorado River Aqueduct, then sell it to water districts as
far as 200 miles away. To minimize the loss of clean
groundwater to salinity and evaporation, Cadiz’s project
wells will intercept the groundwater, and capture it before it
reaches the highly saline brine. Once implemented, the project would conserve and recover billions of gallons of water every
year for beneficial use throughout Southern California.
However, there are hurdles for the project, including a new legislative effort to slow the development and sort out the sci-
ence behind it. The company still needs a permit to join the aqueduct, operated by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern
California, the largest wholesale supplier in the United States. The state Department of Fish and Wildlife also recently challenged
Cadiz’s environmental assessment of the project, but the company does not believe it needs the agency’s permission to move
ahead - except for its plans to alter
streambeds along the pipeline’s pro-
posed route.
The hydrology of the Mojave is at the
center of the debate, specifically within
the system of faults, springs, mountain
ranges, and valleys. The two main
questions: How quickly will the aquifer
recharge with water if drawn down?
And is the aquifer connected to other
sources of groundwater, namely a
spring which serves as an important
watering ground for wandering bighorn
sheep, the threatened desert tortoise,
and migratory birds?
If Cadiz can clear the obstacles
and answer the remaining questions,
the project could be up and running
within a year.
31
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
NOVEMBER 2019
Open the Doorway to all the Event Photos
during
The Water
Expo 2019
To see all the photos from this event,
go to www.worldwidedrillingresource.com
Feel free to download at will and print the photo(s) of your choice.
Compliments of
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
.
Photos are copyrighted and released for personal use only - no commercial use permitted.
W
T
R
Courtesy of Cadiz, Inc.
The
WWDR
WWDR Team would like
to thank all Veterans, and their
families, who have sacrificed
so much so we can live free
.
Veterans Day -
November 11, 2019
Notes from the Groundwater Guy
by Thomas E. Ballard, P.G., C.H.G.
Southeast Hydrogeology, PLLC
Common Causes of Well Failure - Inadequate Well Development
I’ve talked about well development before, and it remains true - inadequate well development is still
one of the biggest problems with wells we see, both in terms of outright well failure and well underperfor-
mance. A well that is not developed properly can continue to underperform throughout its entire life, re-
s
ulting in premature failure.
The purpose of well development is to remove drilling mud and “skin” damage on the borehole wall;
to settle the filter pack and remove sand “bridges” and other formation fines; remove fines/sand from
within the well; and reduce turbidity. All these actions, of course, result in the most efficient flow of groundwater to the well.
So, what can go wrong with well development? A lot, actually!
Not enough time devoted to well development: Our experience with well bids is, the development component is almost
always underbid, usually resulting in a change order if the well development is done correctly. If significant quantities of
drilling mud are lost into the formation during drilling, the development process is going to take correspondingly longer.
Not using measurement parameters during development: Measurement of specific capacity, sand and turbidity, at a
minimum, and continuing development until no substantial improvement is noted in any of these parameters will assure
complete development.
Delays in starting the well development process: Especially in wells drilled with mud, delays in starting the well devel-
opment process can result in the mud gelling to the point where it becomes difficult or impossible to remove, resulting in
a well that permanently underperforms.
Not using the proper development techniques: Most drilling muds are going to contain a certain amount of polymer to enhance
their effectiveness during drilling. This can present problems during the development process as dispersants, that work well
on the actual bentonite-based mud, are less effective in removing the polymers,
which can often require something like chlorine to break them down effectively.
Contaminants in drilling mud: Evidence is mounting that drilling mud can
contain arsenic, lead, mercury, chromium, magnesium, etc., making it critical
that all the mud is removed during the development process to avoid “phan-
tom” water quality issues.
It is often hard to estimate the total well development effort in the bidding
process. One of the things I always tell my clients is, if they are going to get a jus-
tifiable change order, it is likely going to be for well development. The bottom line
with well development is, you are not done until you are done.
Tom
Tom Ballard may be contacted via e-mail to
michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
32
NOVEMBER 2019
Congratulations to:
Congratulations to:
Lauren Creneti
Lauren Creneti
ISEE
ISEE
Cleveland, OH
Cleveland, OH
Winner for October!
Winner for October!
Time for a Little Fun!
October 2019 Puzzle Solution:
Star Iron Works, Inc.
America West Drilling Supply
Win a prize! Send your
completed puzzle to:
WWDR
WWDR PO Box 660
Bonifay, FL 32425
or fax to: 850-547-0329
Can you identify which classified
ads in this issue these two photos
came from?
Foundations
by: Pile Dynamics, Inc.
Piling Driving Hammer
Performance
December 10 ~ ONLINE WEBINAR
phone: 216-831-6131
www.pile.com
Horizontal Directional Drilling
by: Technical Toolboxes
Horizontal Directional Drilling
(HDD) Technologies for Utility and
Pipeline Application
December 10-11 ~ Houston, TX
phone: 713-630-0505
www.technicaltoolboxes.com
Pumps
by: Franklin Electric
Irrigation / Industrial
December 10-11 ~ Wilburton, OK
phone: 800-348-2420
www.franklinwater.com/more/
training/franklintech-schedule/
More education opportunities
during events can be found
online at
worldwidedrillingresource.com
Education
Education
Connection
Connection
W
T
R
You are not done
until you are done.
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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33
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
NOVEMBER 2019
Constructing the Gatlinburg SkyBridge
C
ompiled by Editorial Staff,
WorldWide Drilling Resource
W
orldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
The 2016 Gatlinburg, Tennessee, wildfires destroyed its iconic SkyLift and shop. Both
have since been rebuilt and renovated, now boasting an expansive observation area, new
snack shop and bar, gift shop, and plenty of seating.
The chairlift runs from the downtown area to the top of
Crockett Mountain. The newest attraction at Gatlinburg
SkyLift Park is the SkyBridge, a 680-foot simple sus-
pension pedestrian bridge.
The SkyBridge was designed and constructed by Experiential Resources (ERi), with
help from Hayward Baker, Inc. on the micropile foundation design and installation. The first
order of business was to install a sacrificial micropile. This micropile’s entire purpose was for
testing to be sure all the other micropiles would perform as expected. When tested at maxi-
mum load, the micropile deflected only
.387 inches, and when increased to
200% of design load capacity, the deflection was still less than an inch,
which was within acceptable tolerances.
Each end of the SkyBridge ultimately had ten micropiles installed - eight
in the main bridge foundations and one for each of the two wind guy anchors.
The total feet of micropiles in all foundations was 1480 feet - the shortest
was 45 feet, while the longest was 94 feet. More than one million pounds of
concrete was used.
From the mountaintop SkyDeck, the SkyBridge literally crosses the sky
in a single span, which is a five-foot-wide walking path made of 129 cedar
panels. Its 140-foot-high midpoint features a 15-foot section of glass floor panels for an incredible experience you’ll remember
for a lifetime.
Editor’s Note: In between our print issues, the
WWDR
WWDR Team prepares an electronic newsletter called
E-News Flash
E-News Flash.
Based on readership, this was the most popular
E-News Flash
E-News Flash article of the month. Get in on the action and subscribe today at:
www.worldwidedrillingresource.com
C
&
G
P
hotos courtesy of ERi.
Program in Canada Uses Simulators
for Blasthole Drilling Training
Adapted from an Article by Ian Graham with the Thompson Citizen
R
eprinted with Permission
Six students from remote Manitoba First Nations graduated earlier this year from the first blasthole drilling training program
in Canada, using drill simulators. “This is the first time that simulators have actually been put in the field for people to actually
u
se,” said Keith Taylor of the Austin Powder Company in a promotional video produced for the Manitoba Construction Sector
Council. “We’ve used simulators before, but they’re typically at a location of the manufacturers.”
“My specialty is more focused on the sims,” he explained. “I was trained by a gentleman from Finland for Epiroc and
Sandvik. They actually certified me to be a trainer for their machines. It’s basically like sitting in the cabs of these higher-end drills.”
There is also a mobile simulator lab in a trailer which can be transported to any community that can be reached over land.
Don Ayres taught the students about health and safety, as well as the characteristics of different types of rock that need
to be drilled for blasting. “It’s important that they know what they’re drilling and how they have to adjust for different character-
istics of the rocks so that they can adapt in the field when they go get on the drill. There’s a huge difference from limestone to
granite. Granite’s way harder and you have to slow right down, but limestone, you can punch holes in it pretty quick.”
In contrast to the old way of learning by doing - and trial and error -
starting off on simulators is both safer and more economical. “It takes
some of the experimentation off of the field work,” Ayres stated. “Lots of
times they were damaging drills or they were really hard on bits, really
hard on equipment. With this information, they can take it and they can
adapt and run the machine properly, safely, no issues. That’s one of the
benefits.”
Having completed the training, the students are now qualified to drill
blastholes for roadwork, quarries, and mining. Only one of the students
had prior drill experience, most didn’t have any equipment operating ex-
perience.
Kethan North, 23, from Oxford House (a First Nations Cree commu-
nity in Northern Manitoba), said this training is a way to step into the more skilled aspect of construction, rather than the labor
positions he has been working since graduating high school. “It seemed like a really good opportunity, thought I could make
a career out of it,” he said. “The simula-
tor time was fun. Just getting the hang of
aligning all the blastholes and just get-
ting used to the simulator, that was chal-
lenging. Ill definitely feel a lot more
comfortable being on the drill.”
William Kirkness, Indigenous liaison
of the Manitoba Construction Sector
Council, said in addition to drilling skills,
courses like these also aid students by
making them job ready, so they can
show up every day on time and be pro-
ductive.
While these students had to leave
their communities for training, Kirkness
explains a big part of his job, which
includes submitting proposals for feder-
al funding for training, involves finding
Indigenous trainers who speak the local
language and can provide construction
skills training where students live.
The blasthole drilling training program
in Thompson was delivered through a
partnership of the Manitoba Construction
Centre Council and University College
of the North, with funding provided by
the provincial and federal governments,
and the First Nations the students
belong to.
34
NOVEMBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
E
X
B
Photo by Ian Graham courtesy
of the Thompson Citizen.
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
is proud to be a member of these associations.
Alberta Water Well Drilling Association
Tel : 7 8 0 -3 8 6- 2 33 5
awwda@xplornet.com
A
rizona Water Well Association
admin@azwwa.org
www.azwwa.org
Black Hills Chapter of the ISEE
President: Erik Carlson
www.bitwconference.org
British Columbia Ground Water Assn.
Tel : 6 0 4 -5 3 0- 8 93 4
secretary@bcgwa.org www.bcgwa.org
California Groundwater Association
Tel : 9 1 6 -2 3 1- 2 13 4 F a x : 61 4 -8 9 8- 7 79 1
www.groundh2o.org
Concrete Sawing & Drilling Association
Tel : 7 2 7 -5 7 7- 5 00 4
info@csda.org
www.csda.org
Empire State Water Well Drillers Assn.
Tel : 3 1 5 -3 3 9- 8 96 0 F a x : 31 5 -3 3 9- 8 96 0
sue@nywelldriller.org
www.nywelldriller.org
Florida Ground Water Association
850-205-5641 Fax: 850-222-3019
djessup@executiveoffice.org
www.fgwa.org
Indiana Ground Water Assn.
Tel : 8 8 8 -4 4 3- 7 33 0 F a x : 76 5 -2 3 1- 4 43 0
ingroundwater@gmail.com
www.indianagroundwater.org
Iowa Geothermal Association
Tel : 5 1 5 -2 2 4- 6 46 9
info@iowageothermal.org
www.iowageothermal.org
Kentucky Groundwater Association
Tel : 6 0 6 -5 2 3- 1 21 5 F a x: 86 6 -8 9 6- 0 1 8 4
www.kygwa.org
Louisiana Ground Water Association
Tel : 2 2 5 -7 4 4- 4 55 4
www.lgwa.org
Michigan Ground Water Association
Tel : 8 5 5 -2 2 5- 6 49 2 F a x: 61 4 -8 9 8- 7 7 8 6
www.michigangroundwater.com
Minnesota Water Well Association
Tel : 8 0 0 -3 3 2- 2 10 4
www.mwwa.org
Missouri Water Well Association
Tel : 3 1 4 -9 7 4- 6 99 2
Mwwa.MoWaterWellAssociation@yahoo.com
Montana Water Well Drillers Association
Tel : 4 0 6 -6 8 6- 3 16 8
www.mwwda.org
National Drilling Association
Tel : 8 7 7 -6 3 2- 4 74 8
Fax: 216-803-9900
www.nda4u.com
National Ground Water Association
Tel : 8 0 0 -5 5 1- 7 37 9 F a x : 61 4 -8 9 8- 7 78 6
www.ngwa.org
Nebraska Well Driller Association
Tel : 4 0 2 -4 7 6- 0 16 2
lee@h2oboy.net
www.nebraskawelldrillers.org
New Jersey Ground Water Association
barbemor@gmail.com www.njgwa.org
North Carolina Ground Water Assn.
Tel : 9 1 9 -8 7 6- 0 68 7 e l ai n e@ e xe c ma n . n e t
www.ncgwa.org
North Dakota Well Drillers Association
Tel : 7 0 1 -5 6 7- 4 12 6
ndwda@outlook.com • www.ndwda.com
Northern Plains Chapter of the ISEE
President: Billy Obermire
Tel : 3 0 7 -6 8 9- 0 05 0
www.bitwconference.org
Ohio Water Well Association, Inc.
Tel : 9 3 7 -2 7 8- 0 30 8 F a x : 93 7 -2 7 8- 0 31 7
www.ohiowaterwell.org
Oklahoma Ground Water Association
Tel : 4 0 5 -2 0 9- 6 48 2
josh@okgroundwater.org
www.okgroundwater.org
Ontario Groundwater Association
Tel : 5 1 9 -2 4 5- 7 19 4 F a x : 51 9 -2 4 5- 7 19 6
executivedirector@ogwa.ca
www.ogwa.ca
Pennsylvania Ground Water Association
Tel : 8 1 4 -5 5 3- 3 88 3
pgwaorg@gmail.com www.pgwa.org
Shallow Exploration Drillers Clinic
Tel : 4 0 2 -4 7 2- 7 55 0
jloomis3@unl.edu http://sedc.unl.edu
S
outh Atlantic Well Drillers “JUBILEE”
Tel : 8 5 5 -9 8 7- 7 46 9 F a x : 85 0 -2 2 2- 3 01 9
kbarclay@executiveoffice.org
www.jubileewatershow.com
South Carolina Ground Water Association
Tel : 8 0 3 -3 5 6- 6 80 9 F a x : 80 3 -3 5 6- 6 82 6
scgwa@sc.rr.com www.scgwa.org
South Dakota Well Drillers Association
Tel : 6 0 5 -7 3 4- 6 63 1 w w w.s d wd a .o r g
Southwest Mississippi Community College
Well Construction Technology
Tel : 6 0 1 -2 7 6- 3 73 8
cdunn@smcc.edu
Ten n e s s e e Wate r Wel l A ss o c i a t io n
Tel : 8 6 5 -7 6 1- 4 36 3
tnwaterwellassociation@gmail.com
Tex a s A l l i an c e o f E ne r g y P ro d uc e rs
Tel : 9 4 0 -7 2 3- 4 13 1 F a x : 94 0 -7 2 3- 4 13 2
joannb@texasalliance.org
www.texasalliance.org
Tex a s G r ou n d Wa t e r A ss o ci a ti o n
Tel : 5 1 2 -4 7 2- 7 43 7 F a x : 51 2 -4 7 2- 0 53 7
drobbins@twca.org www.tgwa.org
Utah Ground Water Association
Tel : 8 0 1 -5 4 1- 7 25 9
www.utahgroundwater.org
Vermont Ground Water Association
Ken White, President: 802-738-8400
kwhite.vaw@gmail.com
Margaret Laggis, Executive Secretary
laggistics@comcast.net
Virginia Water Well Association
Tel : 8 0 4 -3 8 7- 8 39 5 F a x : 80 4 -3 0 2- 7 97 8
info@vawaterwellassociation.org
www.vawaterwellassociation.org
2020 Marketing Guides Now Available!
The
WWDR
WWDR Te am is lo o ki n g f o rw a r d to h e l pi n g y o ur
company succeed in 2020. Find out what
WWDR
WWDR can do to
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Contact us today:
850-547-0102
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NOVEMBER 2019
From Coal to Solar: Nanticoke Solar
Adapted from Information by Ontario Power Generation
Ontario Power Generation (OPG), in partnership with the Six Nations
of the Grand River Development Corporation and the Mississaugas of
the Credit First Nation, has completed its first-ever 44-megawatt (MW)
solar facility at the former Nanticoke Generating Station. The Nanticoke
Generating Station is located near Port Dover, Canada, on the shores
of Lake Erie. It was first brought into service in 1972, and had a peak
capacity of approximately 4000 MWs of power. They stopped using
coal as fuel in 2013, having served Ontario for more than 40 years, providing reliable electricity when the system needed it.
The station’s powerhouse is scheduled for demolition in September, and site restoration will follow in 2020.
In 2016, the Independent Electricity System Operator awarded a contract to
OPG and its partners to build Nanticoke Solar. This is OPG’s fourth First Nation
partnership, furthering a legacy of producing clean and renewable power for the
province. PCL Construction was awarded
the construction contract for the Nanticoke
Solar Project, as well as the supply contract
for the project’s photovoltaic (PV) solar pan-
els and racking system.
A total of 192,431 solar panels were
installed on the former coal yard and adja-
cent agricultural lands. To build the expan-
sive solar farm, more than 20,000 helical
piles - long, steel anchors - were buried six feet into the ground, then metal racking
was installed onto this solid foundation. Finally, the solar panels, with an average
rating of 345 watts, were mounted onto the racks. Electrical equipment required to
connect these panels to the power grid such as transformers, breakers, and alter-
nating current - direct current (AC-DC) inverters were installed. The whole site is
controlled by a protection and control building located in the substation.
OPG’s Mike Martelli, president of renewable generation said,Building and
sustaining a clean, low-cost electricity system is fundamental to a healthy environ-
ment and a strong, low-carbon economy. Nanticoke Solar is a continuation of
OPG’s rich legacy of generating electricity in this community.”
Andrew Moles, PCL Construction’s director of solar said, “Our company takes
pride in all of the projects we build, and the Nanticoke Solar Facility is one of many
exciting PCL-built projects in the rapidly growing sustainable energy sector.
Through the expertise of our solar energy team, and the relationships fostered with
top suppliers and consultants, we were able to construct, generate, and store reli-
able, renewable power quickly and efficiently, while ensuring the highest standard
of quality for OPG, First Nations, and the local community.”
New & Used Bits,
HDD Bits & Tools,
Drag Bits & Wings,
Bolt-On Drag Bits,
Reverse Circulation
Tools, Hole Openers,
Claw Bits, Stabilizers, Subs,
Custom Tooling & Welding,
Hammer Bits, Drill Collars,
Pipe Wipers, and Drill Pipe.
Office: (661) 834-4348
Rod Henderson / Eran Henderson
661-201-6259 • 661-330-0790
sales@bitcobits.com
www.bitcoinc.us
36
NOVEMBER 2019
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Where are you planning to go?
How about including these shows:
Jo
in
WWD
R
WWD
R
See more events at www.worldwidedrillingresource.com online issue.
Look for the
WWDR
WWDR Team in the red
jackets at the Groundwater
Week Expo at the Las Vegas
Convention Center in Las
Vegas, Nevada, December
3-5, Booth #340.
The 46
th
Annual Kentucky Blasting Conference
will be December 5-6, at the Lexington
Convention Center / Hyatt Regency Hotel in
L
exington, Kentucky.
The conference includes technical pre-
sentations, workshops, and seminars on blasting methods, materials,
and techniques. There’s also an exhibit area to view the latest products
and equipment. Visit www.kyblastingconference.com
E
N
V
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NOVEMBER 2019
Mining Report from Germany
A
dapted from a Press Release by VDMA Mining
Mining technology is one of the most export-oriented branches of the German engineering
industry, and the VDMA Mining organization represents these companies from the open-cast
mining/materials handling; underground mining; mining processing technology; and consulting,
research, and development sectors. A recent semiannual report from the group shows an upward
trend in German mining technology continues.
j Global demand for mining technology from Germany is increasing, following the difficult period between 2012 and 2017.
Incoming orders rose 35% and turnover went up by 40% in the first half of 2019, compared to the same period in 2018.
j
The industry has coped well with last year’s cessation of German hard coal mining, with companies using the time be-
tween the decision to end coal mining and the closure of the last coal mine in Germany, to target more new customers
abroad. This year, the U.S., China, Australia, and Russia are the largest individual markets alongside Europe. These coun-
tries are also among the world’s largest producers of coal, mining more than 7 billion tons in 2018, predominantly to cover
domestic energy requirements.
j VDMA Mining has launched the Roadmap 2035 initiative with the aim of securing the global competitiveness of the
German mining equipment sector. It provides a platform for manufacturers in the association to discuss the future of min-
ing in regards to data security, utilization of data streams, and the definition of data interfaces, then work together to
devise solutions. Participants in Roadmap 2035 will also examine how to ensure a very high technical standard and inno-
vation leadership. This includes investigating further aspects such as performance, availability, ease of maintenance, or
service life, along with the problem-solving expertise secured through employee training and skills. The roadmap tackles
the recruitment of young talent, as well as industrial and academic training.
j The industry sees further potential in the growing demand for raw materials for energy transition and future technologies.
The corresponding investment made by mining companies in extraction and mineral processing technology for lithium,
cobalt, tantalum, rare earths, and neodymium are reflected in the exports of the mining equipment manufacturers. In
Germany, especially in Saxony, investments have been made in new lithium mining projects. The Zinnwald Lithium proj-
ect south of Dresden recently announced plans had been confirmed by a feasibility study to mine about 5000 tons of lithi-
um annually. In Sadisdorf, also south of Dresden, the Australian mining and technology company Lithium Australia plans
to mine lithium to meet the growing demand for the raw material from the electromobility sector.
M
IN

<HDUV
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Drilling in a Church
Adapted from Information by KLEMM Bohrtechnik GmbH
Drill rigs are occasionally found in unusual locations. Such was the case
with a renovation project at the Catholic Sint Hendrik Church near Brussels,
Belgium. The church was built between 1908
and 1911 in the neo-Gothic style, as a replica of
a Dominican monastery. Before the restoration
work could be carried out, the existing founda-
tions of the church needed to be extended, al-
l
owing the load of the church building to transfer
to the lower layers of earth.
CVR nv, headquartered in Beringen, Belgium,
has used drill rigs from KLEMM Bohrtechnik
GmbH for many years. For this project, they
used a KR 801-3FS drill rig from KLEMM to
make micropiles and cement columns using
the one-phase jet grouting method.
At times, work needed to be performed under some very tight spacial constraints, such as
along the existing foundations of the church. This required a drill rig with compact dimensions,
making the KLEMM KR 801-3FS a great choice for the project. The rig’s flexible and load-bearing
boom enabled the drill mast to be aligned in a wide range of drilling gradients and distances in front of and to the side of the
drill rig. The installed drill mast with lattice mast extensions can drill to depths of up to around 40 feet in single-pass operation.
The drill rods are driven by a rotary head type KH 14SK, which is fitted with a hydraulic mandril for drill rods. During the project,
a total of 123 high-pressure injection (HPI) piles were drilled.
Oil Production Expands in the
Sarqala Field of Kurdistan
Adapted from Information by Gazprom Neft
Gazprom Neft’s subsidiary Gazprom Neft Middle East B.V. commis-
sioned a third production well at its Sarqala field in the Kurdistan Region of
Iraq. It is estimated the potential production at this new well will be 12,000
barrels per day. Following the commissioning of the Sarqala-3 well, cu-
mulative daily oil production at the field has increased by 25%, reaching
35,000 barrels.
An international team, with members from 20 countries, was involved with drilling the well. Gazprom Neft Middle East
received technical support for the project from the Gazprom Neft Science and Technology Centre. The well runs to a total
depth of 10,800 feet, with drilling being performed under challenging geological conditions. Anomalously high pressure and
reservoir temperature demanded the use of 11 technological solutions. The construction of the Sarqala-3 well utilized large-
diameter casing pipes with ultra-strong thread connections, weighted drilling mud for bottom hole flushing, and cement incor-
porating mineral-based and iron-oxide
additives.
Vadim Yakovlev, first deputy CEO of
Gazprom Neft said, The Middle East
remains an area of strategic interest to
Gazprom Neft, being a region with a rich
resource base, and a demonstrable will-
ingness to allow access to investors.
Experience in implementing projects
from scratch - both in exploration and
production - is important to us. We are
continuing to evaluate opportunities for
the further development of our business
in the Middle East - independently and in
partnership with other companies - both
using the synergies offered by existing
project infrastructure, as well as at other
assets.”
39
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NOVEMBER 2019
D
e
a
l
m
a
k
e
r
s
The crew from Bee Cave Drilling, Dripping Springs,
Texas, are all set to start pulling the levers on their
new SIMCO 2800 wet rotary rig from SIMCO
®
Drilling
Equipment, Inc. of Osceola, Iowa. Mounted on a compact
RAM 5500 4X4 AWD truck equipped with a 2X3 centrifugal
mud pump, onboard air compressor, and plenty of 10-
foot PDQ drill rod, they will be installing water wells in
hard-to-access areas. From right to left are Matthew
McGovern, Jim Blair, Jared Wenkheimer, and Mike Scott.
SIMCO
®
Drilling Equipment, Inc.
Send your deals to: michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
C
&
G
Sarqala field in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.
G&O
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NOVEMBER 2019
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Installation Provides Opportunity for Study
A
dapted from Information by the University of Illinois
The Hydrosystems Laboratory addition at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will include a geothermal system.
This innovative method of reducing greenhouse gas emissions
will incorporate conventional geothermal heat exchange loops
in the foundation of a new smart suspension pedestrian
bridge that will connect the Hydrosystems Laboratory to the
Newmark Civil Engineering Laboratory across Main Street in
Urbana. Using the 50-foot-deep shafts already being drilled
for the foundation, will reduce overall geothermal installation
costs and provide for on-site research, as well as heat and cool
the new instructional geotechnical laboratory in the building.
“This project will provide an invaluable opportunity for the
university to conduct a scalability study from lessons learned
during the installation and an excellent basis for a fundamen-
tal understanding of the operational response of the energy
foundations,” said Dr. Tugce Baser, assistant professor of civil
and environmental engineering (CEE).
During installation, Baser will equip the drilled shafts with
thermistors (electrical resistors whose resistance is greatly reduced by heat) and strain gauges to measure axial and radial
strains, as well as temperature profiles, within the foundation. The data set from the installation will enable the evaluation of
operational thermomechanical properties, and the data collected from the project will be used as an input for analyses by stu-
dents in the graduate level CEE 585 Deep Foundations course.
Dr. Mohamed Attalla, executive director of Facilities & Services commented, “The outcomes of this project will be converted
into design guidelines for future installation of energy foundations, which will significantly contribute to the sustainability of the
campus.”
Through the Illinois Climate Action Plan, the University of Illinois has committed to achieving carbon neutrality by no later
than 2050, and geothermal energy is one of several strategies the university is exploring to reduce its environmental impact.
Substantial completion of the entire renovation project is expected by next summer.
G
E
O
Through the Back Door!
by Jim Kuebelbeck
Within the scientific community, the unexplainable human faculty of being able to sense underground
water sources by the dowsing method has long been the subject of controversy. Because no explanation
for this unusual ability in certain individuals can as yet be satisfactorily explained, this ability remains
somewhat of an enigma. From the depictions of the earliest cave drawings found in France and other
countries around the world, however, the practice of locating underground water sources by the dowsing
method seems to have stemmed from the basic need for water as a “survival instinct”. How this particular dowsing technique
was discovered by early humans remains a mystery to this day.
In times of extreme drought, the traditional phrase used by the native tribes of Africa was “Follow the elephants”. For some
unexplainable reason, these majestic animals were able to sense the location of the nearest life-saving water supplies. Wild
donkeys in desert regions around the world have long been known to have this unexplainable ability also. Eagles, crows, and
many other carrion-eating birds can immediately sense the location of the nearest available food source from miles away, with-
out any possible odor or indication to guide them. From thousands of feet away, turtles in lakes can sense the existence of a
dead fish immediately, and head toward
it.
The common robin can somehow
sense the exact location of a worm in
the lawn. One simply has to observe
how they seem to accomplish this -
hopping across the grass, they seem to
“tense up” every few feet, and by the
process of “triangulation”, zero in on the
exact location of their prey. Competent
water dowsers seem to be able to do
much the same.
Is it too much of a stretch to consid-
er the possibility that some of us so-
called advanced human beings still
possess some vestige of such a neces-
sary survival ability as well? As a water
dowser, I am convinced this unusual
human ability to sense the presence of
underground water sources is nothing
more than an innate survival instinct.
Despite the skepticism of those who for
whatever reason do not seem to pos-
sess this unexplainable human faculty,
I truly believe sometime, in the not too
distant future, the need for satisfactory
groundwater sources in many areas of
the world will finally bring the value and
credibility of the practice of water dows-
ing to its deserved legitimacy.
The statements and comments in
this article are based on information and
references believed to be true and fac-
tual. If you have any questions or com-
ments, please forward them to me in
care of
WWDR
WWDR.
Jim
Jim Kuebelbeck may be contacted
via e-mail to michele@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
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®
NOVEMBER 2019
W
T
R
If you could drive your car straight up,
you would arrive in space in just over an
hour.
Obstacles, Learning, & Creativity
by Tim Connor
Obstacles - How do you define obstacles? Something you didn’t expect? Something you don’t like?
S
omething that gets in the way of your goals or progress? Obstacles are a normal part of everyday life,
for everyone. The real issue is, how do you deal with them? By whining, complaining, denying they exist?
Or do you see them as an opportunity to grow, get wiser, or learn a valuable life lesson? Which approach
do you think will have the most favorable outcome or consequence as you go through life? Yes, some
people face more obstacles than others. The reason is simply that they live life with gusto and view it as
an adventure. If you don’t face too many obstacles, my question is: What are you waiting for to create a life worth living?
Learning - The real challenge is the ability or willingness to unlearn rather than learn. Let me explain. You can never learn
it all or know it all, so the secret to success and happiness is learning what you need to and not just chase after useless knowl-
edge. Learning is about developing wisdom that contributes to better decisions, and actions that create fulfillment and satis-
faction. The problem is, much of what we have learned or been taught in life can get in the way of new learning or right learning.
I guarantee there is something in your mental data bank that needs to be unlearned, and is getting in your way. Is it a prejudice?
An attitude developed early in life? Your
opinions of others or circumstances?
Your political or religious teachings? I
once met a person who had a very
strong opinion about professional speak-
ers, so I asked him where his opinion
originated, and guess what his answer
was? "I once heard a speaker who was
arrogant, ego-focused, and really stupid."
So, I asked him, "So you are saying
you are judging an entire profession
based on a single experience?" Well,
needless to say, the conversation
ended.
Creativity - We all have creative
ability. This doesn't mean we are all
potential best-selling authors, artists, or
music writers, but it does mean we all
have creative potential. There are two
problems people face when it comes to
manifesting their creative ability. One -
They are far too concerned with what
other people think of them. They fear
rejection so don't demonstrate their cre-
ative ability. Two - They have a great
deal of inner "rejection" or lack of self-
esteem, and they sabotage their creativ-
ity before they even try. As an author of
over 80 books, I know some of them are
better or worse than others, but I have
never let anyone else (especially some-
one who has never written a book) dis-
suade me from trying. How about you?
Have a desire to do something, but are
letting external or internal issues get in
your way?
In His service,
Tim
Tim Connor may be contacted
via e-mail to michele@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
Serving as an Advocate and Resource
for the Groundwater Industry Since 1992
To register call
Josh McClintock: (405) 258-8747
or go online:
www.okgroundwater.org
Don't miss the only conference dedicated to Oklahoma's
groundwater industry.
Join over 200 water well drillers, pump installers, manufacturers
and suppliers, technical and groundwater professionals
from across Oklahoma and beyond.
Continuing Education Opportunities
Access to Exhibitor Hall
Lunch Buffet with Trade Show
Evening Reception
Networking Opportunities
January 7 & 8, 2020
Embassy Suites Hotel & Conference Center
Norman, OK
2020 OGWA Conference and Trade Show
42
NOVEMBER 2019
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NOVEMBER 2019
D-Geo Pipeline Software for Horizontal Directional Drilling
Adapted from Information by Deltares
Pipelines are lifelines of our modern society, as well as an important part of underground infrastructure. The successful
long-term operation of a pipeline system is largely determined by the quality of the engineering works prior to the installation
of the pipeline. D-Geo Pipeline software provides tools for the design of pipelines in trench and trenchless installations, using
the microtunnelling technique or the horizontal directional drilling (HDD) technique. The software allows the user to minimize
the risks during and after installation.
In HDD, three installation stages are considered - pilot drilling, reaming the initial pilot borehole, and pulling back the
pipeline. Features of the software include advanced input of the groundwater pressure distribution; drained and undrained be-
havior of soil layers; graphical output of calculated drilling
fluid pressures; library with steel and polyethylene
pipelines; standard calculation scheme for bundled
pipelines; calculation of settlement of the soil layers
below the pipeline; and standard pipe stress analysis.
The minimal required drilling fluid pressure is the
pressure necessary for an effective return flow capable
of transporting cut soil particles toward the surface. The
upper boundary of the allowable drilling fluid pressure indicates the pressure at which a blowout is likely to occur. The lower
boundary indicates the pressure at which fractures around the borehole are expected. Both minimum and maximum allowable
drilling fluid pressure depend on depth and soil properties. Drilling fluid pressures are calculated for all installation stages, as
well as along the entire borehole, and visualized in a graph showing both the upper and lower boundary.
D-Geo Pipeline HDD is capable of dealing with pipelines made of different materials. For steel and polyethylene, a database
containing the material data is available, which enables a quick recalculation for alternative material types and dimensions.
The software also calculates the pulling force required to pull the pipeline into the prereamed borehole. The pullback force
is based on buoyancy control and consideration of the soil-pipeline interaction in the bends of the drilling line.
Soil mechanical parameters are used for a pipeline stress analysis. The standard pipeline stress analysis by D-Geo Pipeline
HDD is based on a limited set of parameters. The software calculates the stresses in the pipeline during the installation stages
in both axial and tangential direction. In a comprehensive report, a stress verification is given for each pipeline material used.
The pipeline stress report contains used input data; calculated axial, tangential, and combined stresses for all installation
stages; verification of the pipe stresses; check on pipeline deflection; and check on implosion for polyethylene pipelines.
CUSTOM SPECIALTY WINCHES FOR
WELL DRILLING AND PUMP HOIST TRUCKS
Manufactured with
your specifications
in mind
BLOOM MANUFACTURING, INC.
Custom Engineering Solutions Since 1910
Independence, IA 50644 USA
www.bloommfg.com
P: +1 319-827-1139
P: 800-394-1139
F: +1 319-827-1140
DESIGNED FOR OUTSTANDING
PERFORMANCE & SAFETY
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SANDLINE WINCHES
1800 to 8000 pounds
Up to 800 feet per minute
WINCHES
44
NOVEMBER 2019
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DIR
What’s the Big Deal about Carbon Capture and Storage?
Adapted from Information by ExxonMobil
The electricity we use each day is mostly generated by power plants which produce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions when
operating. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is considered a
key technology as society moves toward better addressing the
risks associated with CO2 entering the atmosphere. CCS is held
in high regard by leading scientists and policy makers because it
is one of the few human-engineered technologies with the poten-
tial to stabilize global emissions of CO
2 by removing them before
they reach the atmosphere.
By using CCS technology in a 500-megawatt power plant,
enough CO2 could be eliminated to offset the amount of green-
house gases emitted by hundreds of thousands of cars each
year. It is anticipated a fully developed CCS could capture up to
20% of global carbon emissions. Some of
these emissions could be safely stored
underground, while others could be
transformed into commercial products.
At ExxonMobil, the need for CCS is
well understood. Over the past 40
years, the company has captured the
most CO
2 of any company, and they
continue to make strides to develop
more efficient ways to scale up this cru-
cial technology.
While the gas and oil industry has
used CCS for years, a collaboration
between ExxonMobil and FuelCell
Energy is developing new CCS technol-
ogy which could produce additional
power while removing CO
2 emissions.
Current technologies consume more
power, which means even more power
has to be produced, so more CO2 has
to be captured. Instead of drawing
power, the carbon capture technology
they are working on creates it, allowing
the process to minimize the environ-
mental footprint of the power plant.
The new CCS technology uses fuel
cells to separate CO
2 from the exhaust
stream of a power plant, making the
CO
2 easier to capture and pipe under-
ground. Since fuel cells are modular,
they can be easily deployed at a wide
range of locations. Through the process,
the majority of CO2 will be removed and
collected for storage, then compressed
CO2 is safely piped to depths over 3000
feet underground.
While still early in development,
the process vastly reduces the amount
of CO2 released, has the potential to
dramatically reduce costs, and may
create a pathway for widespread CCS
use around the world.
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Core Drilling Leads to A New Age of Energy Generation
Adapted from Information by Krafla Magma Testbed
During deep geothermal drilling beneath the Icelandic volcano Krafla, scientists identified the precise location of a magma
chamber at a depth of over a mile with temperatures of 1650ºF (900ºC). To take advantage of the discovery, the Krafla Magma
Testbed (KMT) concept was developed by an ambitious international collaboration of around 50 research institutes, government
agencies, and universities from 12 countries, including the United States.
The KMT will become the first international magma observatory and laboratory
for advanced studies and experiments in magmatic, volcanic, and geothermal sys-
tem dynamics. The open, multiuser facility will be a base for investigating the high-
est temperature processes in the crust of rocky planets, which will give insight
needed for exploration of extreme environments.
KMT research will improve how the world reads signs of volcanic unrest, im-
proving civil protection for the 800 million people who live within 60 miles of an
active volcano. By establishing where and under what conditions magma is
stored, multiple sensors can be used to provide direct measurements of changes
in temperature, gas content, crystallization, and pressure which could signify an
eruption. To harness near magma heat in regions across the world, new drilling
technology and sensor systems capable of working in extreme environments will
be used, establishing state-of-the-art technology and solutions.
In the first phase, a crew will drill a new research borehole with the aim of recovering a core from the boundaries of solid
and molten rock, while monitoring temperatures. The borehole will be cased using new innovative, patented, flexible couplings,
allowing the steel to thermally expand without accumulating too much stress and strain on the casing. After successful recovery
of a core, the borehole will be allowed to heat up, under constant monitoring and supervision, which will make it possible to
monitor magma in situ.
Following a successful proof of concept, the team plans to revisit the first hole to recover another core, and monitor tem-
perature as well as pressure, while the borehole heats up again. When conditions at the bottom of the well have reached those
of the surrounding environment, the team may initiate flow testing of the well, which involves cooling the magma. If it is deemed
the well and the conditions are suitable without jeopardizing its future, a flow test will assess the flexible couplings’ and casing’s
ability to survive the harsh condition of high-temperature and corrosive geothermal fluids. It will also provide a valuable oppor-
tunity to sample the chemistry of the geothermal fluid close to magma, as well as allow for geothermal engineering testing and
experiments.
In the third phase, the team will take another magma core from the first well and deploy a customized sonde to measure
viscosity and density of the magma in situ.The sonde will be designed to sense the solid base of the magmatic body, defining
the thickness of magma underlying the geothermal system.
In the fourth phase, the intention is to drill a second research hole and recover a core in a different part of the magma
reservoir, while monitoring pressure and temperature in the first hole to test the response of the magmatic system to geothermal
drilling activity. This data and associated stimulation of magma in two places will enhance our ability to image the spatial dis-
tribution of the magma reservoir.
After completing the initial delivery
phases, the KMT research facility will
be opened to the research community.
The facility will be open to the wider
community through yearly calls for pro-
posals, which will be considered by the
KMT Executive Board.
47
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Open the Doorway to all the Event Photos during
National Drilling Association 2019
To see all the photos from this event,
go to www.worldwidedrillingresource.com
Feel free to download at will and print the photo(s) of your choice.
Compliments of
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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Photos are copyrighted and released for personal use only - no commercial use permitted.
G
E
O
January Issue Deadlines!
Space Reservation:
November 25
th
Display & Classified
Ad Copy:
December 1
st
www.starironworks.com
SERVING THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY
Serving the Drilling Industry
257 Caroline Street
Punxsutawney, PA 15767
800-927-0560 814-427-2555
Fax: 814-427-5164
48 NOVEMBER 2019
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Industry Announcements
Wyo-Ben, Inc. is pleased to announce the availability of a new app featuring easy-to-
use calculators for all your drilling needs. Save time and money while increasing jobsite
productivity using the free app available in the App Store and Google Play.
(scan this code
T
)
Doosan Portable Power
is introducing a new online parts store for easy
online ordering and fast delivery of more than 15,000 parts for Doosan air compressors,
generators, light towers, and light compaction equipment.
“Doosan Portable Power is focused on serving our customers by providing the
convenience of an around-the-clock online ordering option,said David McBride, director
of aftermarket. Our online parts store allows us to make our products more accessible
to customers who otherwise may be limited by location or time when purchasing genuine
Doosan parts.”
The
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
Team’s Upcoming 2020 Schedule
Everyone is always asking, so here is the answer to the question, “Where will we see you next?”
January, February, March 2020: Oklahoma Ground Water Association Convention / Utah Ground Water Association
Convention / Louisiana Ground Water Association Convention / Empire State Water Well Drillers Convention / Texas Ground
Water Association Convention / Underground Construction Utility Conference / Mountain States Ground Water Conference /
Virginia Water Well Association Convention / CONEXPO-CON/AGG / New England Water Well Conference / Tennessee Water
Well Association Convention / CGA 811 Excavation Safety Conference / Alberta Water Well Drillers Convention . . .
AND MORE TO COME . . .
We will see you on the trail
. . .
New San Andres Drilling Program
Adapted from a Press Release by
H
ouston American Energy Corp.
Houston American Energy Corp. is participating in a new drilling program in the
San Andres Formation located in the Northern Shelf of the Permian Basin. Under
the agreement, the company will acquire a 20% working interest in an existing
5
871-acre block. Houston American will pay 26.667% of the costs for an initial test
well through the point at which the well is drilled, completed, equipped, and ready
for operation, production, or disposal. All additional operations will be conducted as
needed.
Also outlined, was an area of mutual inter-
est (AMI) in approximately 20,367 acres in the
area of, and including, the existing acreage
covered by the agreement. The parties will
have the right to participate, at cost, in any
interest acquired in the AMI over the following
five years.
Jim Schoonover, CEO of Houston American
Energy stated, “This agreement is the culmination of more than a year of effort to identify
a suitable growth platform. We believe this agreement has the potential to be such a plat-
form. We expect an initial horizontal test well will commence on the block before the end
of 2019. If successful, we believe the existing acreage will support drilling of up to 50
wells over the next four to five years with the acquisition of additional acreage under the
AMI supporting additional wells. Upon completion of our acquisition of this acreage, together with our existing holdings in
Reeves County and Yoakum County, we believe we will be positioned to resume sustainable growth in production, revenues,
reserves, and shareholder value.”
www.starironworks.com
SERVING THE WATER WELL INDUSTRY
Serving the Drilling Industry
257 Caroline Street
Punxsutawney, PA 15767
800-927-0560 814-427-2555
Fax: 814-427-5164
49
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NOVEMBER 2019
T
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Tales from the Field
by Jeremy C. Wire
Geoconsultants, Inc.
An Encounter One Night ~ with an Owl
Before there were digital devices available for measuring water levels, running a well pumping test
for any length of time usually involved measurements taken by hand using a steel tape or an electric
sounder. If a test period was 24 to 72 hours in duration, water level measurements needed to be made
overnight by some unlucky person, who would be awakened hourly by an alarm clock, take the readings, check the portable
generator running the submersible pump for fuel, and then try to get some sleep between times.
Our company was involved in such a pumping test program in a rather remote area, where two wells about one-quarter
of a mile apart were simultaneously monitored over a period of several nights. A dirt road connected them, and the routine at
night was to be awakened by the alarm clock, check the first well, drive to the other well and take a measurement, then try
to get some sleep before starting the routine again in an hour. This activity went on for two nights, but on the third night when I
was on duty, an unusual event occurred.
It was midnight, being pitch dark, when driving slowly on the road between the two wells, a large owl suddenly landed in
the middle of the road in front of the truck. Of course I stopped, thinking the owl might not like the glare of the headlights and
would fly away. I waited a few minutes, but the owl stayed in place facing the truck about 20 feet away.
Even after moving cautiously ahead, the owl moved backwards accordingly, still standing upright in the middle of the road.
I moved forward again and the same thing happened. I thought if I turned the lights off for a while, it would perhaps motivate
the bird to fly off. However, this did not happen, and there being no way of driving around the animal, the routine of driving the
truck forward a bit with the owl again backing away a short distance, continued for about another 15 minutes. Then suddenly
the owl disappeared. I thought about this incident later during intervals of being awake, until morning when my relief came to
shut the test down. Was this visit by an owl just a momentary hallucination in the middle of the night while being half asleep,
or did it really happen?
I had heard that in Native American Indian culture, the owl is considered a bad omen or a symbol of death. At the time, I
had no knowledge of a foreboding event, or any friend or close relative who was in poor health and might have passed away.
However, when I returned home the next night, I was relating the incident to my wife, who stopped me in mid-sentence. “You
know, when we were talking over the telephone earlier today, I forgot to mention I heard this morning that your elderly aunt
had peacefully passed away last night.”
So it was for me to decide whether this was just a coincidence, but every time I see an owl or hear its screech (which is
rare), I remember the encounter with that owl in the middle of the road, and still do not have an answer to this question.
Jeremy
Jeremy Wire may be contacted via e-mail to michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
Empire State Water Well Drillers
Association Annual Meeting
January 14-15, 2020
For more information, visit us online:
www.nywelldriller.org
January 14
th
9 am - 4:30 pm Board Meeting, Variety of Classes (TBD)
4:30 - 7:30 pm Cocktail Party & Trade Show
January 15
th
9 am - noon General Membership Meeting
Turning Stone Resort Casino
Verona, NY
For Hotel Reservations: 800-771-7711
www.turningstone.com
50
NOVEMBER 2019
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E
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51
If you are still calling them greedy, then the problem lies within you. If you don’t like
the amount of possessions or wealth someone has, then perhaps you are envious.
If that’s the case, then you calling a person greedy is all about you projecting your envy.
For most people to acquire great wealth, they have to come up with a good idea, an innovation, or as Ralph Waldo
Emerson observed, build a better mousetrap that will cause the world to beat a path to their door. In other words, they have
to serve humanity. They have to create something people want. Just because you’ve earned more than you need, you don’t
stop doing what you did to make it. The world would be a much poorer place if you did. What if Bill Gates had stopped making
computer software after he made his first billion? Sure, someone else would eventually enter the market, but until then the
price of software would go up.
O
ver the years, I’ve seen various products I loved disappear from the market. The most likely cause was there was not
enough demand for those products for the companies to continue making them; occasionally it was because the producer
got “tired” of working and retired. Hmm . . . perhaps I should say that person was greedy for wanting their time more than
they wanted to produce things I love.
Maybe you think acquiring ostentatious homes, cars, and clothing make a person greedy. You might snidely call them nouveau
riche. Indeed their taste might be tacky, but if you have any empathy, you can see they are just trying to feel important. Everybody
wants to feel important, and it isn’t greed. Feel sorry for them, it takes time to learn how to enjoy enormous wealth with grace.
What about corporate greed, you ask? Again, no such thing. First of all, corporations, like other inanimate objects, cannot
feel greed. They are owned by people called stockholders. Are the stockholders greedy for wanting to invest in a growing
company? You’d think they were idiots if they invested in a failing company. So then, is it the people running the company
who are greedy because they earn huge salaries? They only get those salaries if they are producing wealth for the stock-
holders. So once again, it is earned wealth, they haven’t stolen it.
What about corporations that bribe Congress to pass regulations to keep out competition? Aren’t they greedy? No, they
are thieves. By using the strong arm of the government to get an unfair advantage over competitors, they reduce options and
choices which cost consumers more money. And, regardless of how legal it is, it is still morally theft.
But what about companies that produce shoddy - even dangerous - products just to make a buck? Aren’t they being
greedy? Again, no. If it is a hidden danger, then they are being dishonest and stealing from the purchaser. If it is known to
be inferior, then it is