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PPhhoonnee:: 882288--332222--33005566 FFaaxx:: 882288--332222--44004422
22551155 HHiigghhwwaayy 7700 SSWW HHiicckkoorryy,, NNCC 2288660022
EE--mmaaiill:: jjeeffffjj@@ddrriilllliinnggeeqquuiipp..ccoomm
wwwwww..ddrriilllliinnggeeqquuiipp..ccoomm
Single & Double Hopper
Rose-Wall Grouters
Rose-Wall Water Truck
Pulstar P12000
Pulstar P8000 Pulstar P12000
Pulstar P10000
Pulstar P10000
mounted on a Dodge 5500
Pulstar P7000
Volume 15October 2019
2
OCTOBER 2019
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®
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OCTOBER 2019
4
OCTOBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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Breaking News..................................................................13
Classified Section:
WorldWide SUPER MART
WorldWide SUPER MART..................50-64
Dealmakers........................................................................35
Education Connection......................................................19
Fun Page............................................................................32
Hot Off the Press.................................................................9
Industry Announcements.................................................36
Obituary: Gross, Kenneth Richard “Ken”.......................26
Obituary: Purchase, A. Richard “Rick”...........................26
Obituary: Thomas, Rick L.................................................20
Photo Gallery......................................................................38
Product Spotlight..............................................................14
Where are you planning to go?........................................46
Who’s in the News.............................................................13
WorldWide Association Memberships
WorldWide Association Memberships................................27
WorldWide Business Directory
WorldWide Business Directory.............................10,11,12
WorldWide
WorldWide
.........6
Editorial Focus for October - Geothermal
C&G
DIR
ENV
EXB
G&O
GEO
MIN
WTR
Allegheny Instruments........................................................46
America West Drilling Supply..............................................61
Armstrong Machine Co., Inc. (AMCI)..................................33
Atlantic Screen & Manufacturing, Inc. (ASI)........................45
Baker Water Systems.........................................................44
Baroid Industrial Drilling Products (IDP)…....…….…..........16
Better Water Industries, Inc.................................................18
Bit Brokers International.....................................................19
Bitco, Inc.............................................................................14
Bloom Mfg., Inc.....................................................................9
California Groundwater Association (CGA) Convention......43
Central Mine Equipment Company (CME)..........................34
CONEXPO-CON/AGG
®
......................................................24
Diedrich Drill…....................................................................21
Drilling Equipment Sales, Inc. (DES)....................................1
Drilling Supply & Mfg (DSM)...............................................31
DRILLMAX
®
........................................................................64
Eastern Driller Manufacturing Company Inc. (EDM)...........62
Empire State Water Well Drillers Assoc. (ESWWDA) Ann. Mtg..17
Foremost Industries............................................................26
GEFCO, Inc. (an Astec Industries Company).......................2
Geoprobe Systems
®
............................................................39
Geothermal Supply Company, Inc. (GSC)............................8
Grundfos Pumps Corporation.............................................15
Infinity Tool Manufacturing....................................................3
Kentucky Blasting Conference............................................20
KS Bit, Inc...........................................................................49
Louisiana Ground Water Assoc. (LGWA) Convention.........30
Mills Machine Company, Inc...............................................29
N&N Drilling Supply.............................................................25
Palmer Bit Company...........................................................42
SEMCO, Inc........................................................................63
SIMCO
®
Drilling Equipment...................................................4
Star Iron Works, Inc............................................................22
Star Iron Works, Inc............................................................23
TDH Manufacturing Inc.......................................................40
Texas Ground Water Assoc. (TGWA) Convention...............37
Utah Ground Water Association (UGWA) Conf. and Expo..41
Well-Vu, Inc...........................................................................7
Wyo-Ben, Inc......................................................................13
Advertisers
Featured Editorial:
C&G - Construction/Geotechnical
ENV - Environmental
G&O - Shallow Gas and Oil
M
IN - Mining
DIR - Horizontal Directional Drilling
E
XB - Exploration/Blasthole
GEO - Geothermal
WTR - Water
Storkson, Britt: New and Improved Sometimes Isn’t..18
AEM - Leadership for Over a Century.......................28
Canada Tests New Commercial-Scale Geothermal..38
Battersby, Mark E.: Drilling Into Money Not Boring..20
Keep the Airport Open...............................................36
“Smith, Billy Bob”: The “Idiot’s” Corner..................40
Curiosity, Mars Rover, Drills at Aberlady!..................14
Be Aware of Soil Contamination When Installing......25
Kwader, Thomas: Environmental Monitoring...........41
Wilson, Jr., Robert Evans: The Un-Comfort Zone II..........8
Canada Explores for Potential Rare Earth Elements....33
America’s First Gold Rush........................................43
White, Harold: Oil/Water Exploration.......................12
ExxonMobil - “Carrying the Brand”............................23
Former Gas & Oil Lab Open for Geothermal Testing...17
Ten Geothermal Projects Awarded Funding..............30
Wire, Jeremy: Tales from the Field..........................37
Clean, Cost-Effective, Reliable Energy Solution...........47
Copper: Bright Future - Glorious Past...........................22
E-News Flash
E-News Flash
Readers Choice
Readers Choice: Most Complete.......35
Joy Komatsu - A Century of Mining Solutions............44
Connor, Tim: Do It Now..............................................45
A Safer, Faster Way to Handle Casing Pipe................7
Ballard, Thomas: Notes from the Groundwater Guy..29
Kuebelbeck, Jim: Through the Back Door!..............32
Offering the Latest in Drilling Technology..................45
Rasmussen, Tim: Water For Life International........46
5
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OCTOBER 2019
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roudly
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e
re
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roudly
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in
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c
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o
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& oi
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t
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dr
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l
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j
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om
pl
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t
e
d
!
M
a
na
gi
n
g
Publish
er/
C
EO/
Pre
side
nt:
Veronica I. “R
o
nn
i
e
” Jo
nes
Vice President:
Troy Cunningham
C
h
i
e
f
M
a
rke
t
i
n
g
Of
f
i
ce
r:
Ed
M
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ra
n
ski
Of
f
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ce
Ad
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st
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t
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Bo
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r:
C
a
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l
Sch
i
m
p
f
Public Relat
ions Prof
essionals:
Kat
hy Heinrich
Jan Allen
Production/Webmaster: Marcel Schimpf
Representative:
Marie Cunningham
Editorial Contributors for this month:
Tom Ballard Mark Battersby Tim Connor Jim Kuebelbeck
Thomas Kwader
Tim Rasmussen “Billy Bob Smith” Britt Storkson
Harold White Robert Evans Wilson, Jr. Jeremy Wire
Hyd/Eng Consultant:
Thomas Kwader, Ph.D.,P.G.
Consultant:
Mary Ann Pelletier
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After the Anniversary . . .
Time marches on and so do our relationships with our families, with our friends, and even with our work families.
We spend more time with our work families than with our real families at home - that is a fact based on eight plus hours
a day, or night for that matter.
So here is the question of the hour: “What would you do for your work family?”
Well, we could all think of a few things we would do like help them learn from us ~ the different, perhaps better or
quicker ways to complete a task whether it be at work or with something they need to do at home. We might even offer
to take them to the doctor, shopping, drop their children off at school, or even watch their children for them as they go
through some crisis of their own.
Now comes the BIG question . . .
Would you do anything in your power to ensure their future in your company?
What I mean by that is, would you put your future and that of your company on the line to find another avenue of
income the company could handle to ensure their futures and that of the company - even though there is some risk-
taking involved?
Well, if you started the company, you took risks, right? So the last question I have is this . . .
Do you think “Can’t Ever Did Anything?”
I, for one, don’t think it ever did and it never will - so some risk-taking for the sake
of your work family and their families as well as you and yours, is worth it. As my
husband and I used to always say, “We could start all over again in a tent, if everything
were taken away from us, and be happy.”
So march on we shall. Great things are on the horizon for you and
WWDR
~ stay tuned.
We Will See you on the trail!
NEXT STOP ~ CGA
With pen
(computer) in hand
. . .
Ronnie, Managing
Publisher
ronnie@worldwidedrillingresource.com
Canada
Constructs
Geothermal
Demonstration
Facility
Page 38
Featured Articles for October
Former Gas & Oil Lab Open
for Geothermal Testing
Page 17
Funding Awarded
to Geothermal
Projects
Page 30
A Reliable Energy
Solution for Australia
Page 47
7
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WorldWide Drilling Resource
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OCTOBER 2019
A Safer, Faster Way to Handle Casing Pipe
A
dapted from Information by TekMark Industries, Inc.
Larry Williams was once an administrator and teacher at Eastern Washington University,
with his B.A. and M.B.A. in business. He acquired patents for casing elevators and casing slips
invented by Chester and Clyde Eastwood of Eastwood Drilling in Yakima,
Washington, and decided to open his own company, TekMark Industries, in 1975. The company’s first tools
were unique to the water well drilling industry and provided a safer, faster way of handling casing pipe installations
in open hole situations. The lifting system allows drilling operators to eliminate the need to weld lugs and the
use of cable slings to elevate and install casing.
Over the past 44 years, the company has flourished by providing innovative solutions to casing- and pipe-handling
problems and expanding its line with the addition of:
j Down-the-hole casing spears j Flush joint casing elevators j Torch cutoff guides
j Alignment clamps j PVC cutoff guides j Column pipe elevators
j Manual down-the-hole liner setters and casing retrievers
j A wide selection of drill pipe, core rod, and column pipe holders
The Tekmark Team works with thousands of customers worldwide, doing business with 8000 U.S. companies,
as well as customers in 71 foreign countries. One of those cus-
tomers is Dell Boyce. Here is what he had to say about his ex-
perience with the TekMark Team.
“I’m Dell Boyce. I own Boyce Drilling and we drill irrigation wells in the Columbia
Basin of Eastern Washington. I’ve been using TekMark Casing Lifters for about
six years. TekMark’s system is so much better than something you weld on and
then have to cut back off. I have the system for casing sizes from 6 inches through
18 inches. The speed and efficiency of the system saves us just about a full day
of casing setting time per well, and we just about pay for the tools on one job . .
. TekMark means safety and efficiency to me.”
With affordably priced solutions, the company is committed to continued cus-
tomer satisfaction and is looking forward to continued growth.
The TekMarkHeavy
Lifter has a 140,000-
p
ound capacity.
Dell Boyce,
YouTube TekMark Casing.
WT
R
The Un-Comfort Zone II
by Robert Evans Wilson, Jr.
The Unfolding Gift of a Sister
I was sitting at the kitchen table eating my breakfast when I noticed, above me, a nail hole in the
plaster where a picture had hung. It was a black spot on the wall directly across from my sister, who was
sitting in a highchair busily eating her breakfast. I glanced over my shoulder toward the stove, and ob-
served my mother had left the room. It was my chance to have some fun. I knew my sister was terrified
of insects, so I called her name and emphatically pointed toward the hole in the wall, “Cindy, look, a bug!”
She screamed in horror, and I doubled over laughing. Mother rushed into the room to see what was the matter. After assuring
Cindy it was not a bug, she yelled at me for scaring her. I acted contrite, but inside I was still chuckling in satisfaction. I was
seven years old.
I had been an only child for four years, when my life as the center of attention in my parents’ world ended with the birth of
my sister. It’s tough for a four-year-old to share the limelight with a sibling when he never had to before. What I didn’t realize
was my parents were giving me a gift. She was a purposeful gift on their part, but I wouldn’t come to appreciate that for decades.
I don’t recall how often I teased, tormented, or bullied my sister, but it wasn’t enough for her to fear or dislike me, and for
that I’m grateful. By the time I was a teenager, our age and gender differences separated us emotionally, and I spent less and
less time interacting with her. I wasn’t intentionally ignoring her, I was just too caught up in my own life to be fully aware of
hers. This would continue until we were adults.
When we lost our dad to a stroke, I was there for her when she asked, but I was still too immature to recognize her needs
when she didn’t ask. Within a few years, we were both married, and only saw each other at the formal family gatherings at
Mothers house on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter. Then 11 years after Dad died, we lost Mother too. And, even though
Cindy was my last tie to the memories of our parents, we saw each other even less.
My parents great gift to me might have been lost had Cindy and I not been divorced by our spouses. It was when we both
went through our divorces that we truly discovered each other for the first time. We found the emotional strength we needed
to survive in each other. We talked on the phone frequently, and gave each other pep talks as needed. In the years since, we
have grown closer and closer.
Over the years I have come to love Cindy, not just as my sister, but as one of my best friends. Now, I can fully realize and
appreciate the value of the sacrifice my parents’ were making when they decided to have her.
You see, in 1960, my father was diagnosed with kidney failure. His doctors told him there was no cure, he was going to die, and
he and Mother needed to start making plans. The most remarkable plan they made was to
have another child. With my mother facing inevitable widowhood and single motherhood,
she agreed to have a second child. Their motivation was to save me from being an “only
child.They decided to conceive a second baby, who might be born after Dad died, so
I would never be alone. As an adult, who has raised two children as a single parent,
I find it astounding they would have made such a decision. Yet, I am so happy they did.
You might recall from my previous article, Good Habit - Questionable Motive in the Nov.
2009
WWDR
WWDR, that my father, who was a builder, sold our house in preparation for his
death, and used the proceeds to build a three-unit apartment house my mother could rent
out and live in. I also wrote that my mother, who at the time was a stay-at-home mom,
was trained as an X-ray technician. She planned on going back to work part time once
my father passed away, then full time when Cindy and I were old enough for school.
In the meantime, she worked temporary jobs to keep her radiology skills up to date.
It was at one of those temp jobs she came across an article in a medical journal -
and it saved my father’s life. She read about a physician in Boston who was performing
the worlds first kidney transplants. At the time of publication, he was looking for volun-
teers who had to be an identical twin. My father was an identical twin, so my mother
called the physician, and he agreed to operate. My uncle agreed to give my father
a kidney, and my father became the 12th person in the world to have a kidney
transplant and live. He lived another 18 years - until Cindy and I were both adults.
Both of my parents died at relatively young ages. Losing them made me par-
ticularly grateful for their gift. At some of the most challenging moments of my life,
my sister has been there for me. I don’t know that I could have coped without her.
Thank you, Cindy. Thank you, Mom and Dad.
Robert
Robert is an innovation/change speaker, author, and consultant. He
works with companies that want to be more competitive through innovation
and with people who want to think more creatively.
For more information on Rob, visit www.RobWilsonSpeaker.com or contact
him via e-mail to michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
Atlantis Vault
Atlantis Vault
• Self-Contained
• Self-Contained
• Simple installation
• Simple installation
• Trouble-free operation
• Trouble-free operation
For more information call:
(270) 786-3010
or visit us online:
www.geothermalsupply.com
8
OCTOBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
CUSTOM SPECIALTY WINCHES FOR
WELL DRILLING AND PUMP HOIST TRUCKS
Manufactured with
your specifications
in mind
BLOOM MANUFACTURING, INC.
Custom Engineering Solutions Since 1910
Independence, IA 50644 USA
www.bloommfg.com
P: +1 319-827-1139
P: 800-394-1139
F: +1 319-827-1140
DESIGNED FOR OUTSTANDING
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Up to 130 feet per minute
SANDLINE WINCHES
1800 to 8000 pounds
Up to 800 feet per minute
WINCHES
9
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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®
®
OCTOBER 2019
Numa Releases Range of HDD Drilling Systems
Numa’s HDD (horizontal directional drilling) systems consist of a variety of HDD components including hammers, bits,
side load sonde housings, bent subs, and adaptors capable of drilling holes 4 to 7-1/2 inches in diameter, and are designed
for productive and efficient drilling in hard rock and fractured ground formations. Some of the many benefits of Numa’s HDD
hammer line are improved steerability, fast penetration rate, simplified field maintenance, reduced air requirements, and
lower overall cost per foot.
“Numa has a long history of serving the HDD market, and with our range of HDD Drilling
Systems, we enhance our ability to serve our customers with the right products for the
job,” said Numa President Ralph Leonard. “Our high-quality, Made in the USA HDD prod-
ucts provide the right balance of performance and dependability without
sacrificing tool life.”
A single bore design allows for a maximum bore diameter, along with
providing optimum life against abrasion.
Numa’s full line of HDD Drilling Systems includes the models:
j
HDD 35 for holes 3-7/8 to 4 inches in diameter
j
HDD 40 for holes 4-3/4 to 5 inches in diameter
j
HDD 50 for holes 5-3/4 to 6-1/8 inches in diameter
j
HDD 60 for holes 7 to 7-1/2 inches in diameter
For a link to this website, visit worldwidedrillingresource.com
10
OCTOBER 2019
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Think this
is it? Not so,
look on the next
page.
11
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OCTOBER 2019
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give us a call: (850) 547-0102
or e-mail: wwdr@
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12 OCTOBER 2019
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Oil/Water Exploration
by Harold White
When I write an article in
WWDR
WWDR, a lot of well-educated people are reading it, so I have had a few
calls and questions from them. The last letter I received from a New York subscriber, wanting to know
what I use to detect water, gas, and oil, and why I haven’t written about the equipment I use. I have
written about the equipment I use. I can do everything I say I can, and all the stories in
WWDR
WWDR are
about things I have done.
I have a been a well drilling professional since 1952, locating underground fluids for domestic,
stock, irrigation, city water wells, oil wells, gas wells, hot water wells, and pumps.
I have written about my friend Jereal in Kentucky, who has an advanced radiometrics type of detection for these fluids he
built years ago, and has been improving it ever since. We worked together doing detection, finding gas and oil. I taught him to
sense the underground fluids.
In another article, I wrote about Cecil, a friend from Texas who operates a radiometrics detection device. He asked me to
take him flying in a rental Cessna 150 airplane. The company would pay to fly over some areas in Kentucky with his radio, and
map the area for gas and oil. I could see way ahead of his detection - I could tell him where and when his detection unit would
find gas and oil fractures. What did I use for detection? My vision, my friend, his radiometric unit, and an airplane. Yes, this all
worked.
I was the pilot. My father learned to fly from Charles Lindbergh before Lindbergh flew across the ocean, and I learned to
fly from my father, Albert White.
Harold
Harold White may be contacted via e-mail to michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
G&O
Vermeer Location Expands
Vermeer Mid Atlantic, an All Roads company, has acquired Vermeer Northeast, a
Pinnacle Award-winning dealer partner of Vermeer Corporation. The combined com-
panies will adopt a new brand name - Vermeer All Roads.
Vermeer All Roads will have 15 locations covering South Carolina, North Carolina,
Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, New York, Maine,
Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont.
Vermeer Mid Atlantic’s demonstrated market leadership is greatly enhanced by the
addition of Vermeer Northeast,” said Mark Boyle, president of Vermeer Mid Atlantic.
“We look forward to delivering exceptional service and building on the success the
Vermeer Northeast team has established in the market over the last 50+ years.”
Breaking News
Breaking News
WHOS IN THE NEWS
WHOS IN THE NEWS
You can find additional announcements from Sandvik and Messe München
Shanghai in our online issue at: worldwidedrillingresource.com
Send your Who’s in the News to:
Bonnie@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
Astec Industries Appoints New CEO and President
Astec Industries, Inc. announced the appointment
of Mr. Barry Ruffalo as president and chief executive
officer. He has also been elected to the Board of
Directors as a Class I director and will stand for reelection
at the Company’s 2020 annual meeting.
“After a comprehensive search that included a
number of highly qualified candidates, we are excited
to hire Mr. Ruffalo,” said Bill Gehl, chairman of Astec.
“Barry brings a wealth of experience to Astec. He is
a leader that has driven change, understands infra-
structure, and will add tremendous value.”
Two Rivers Marketing
Jean Hiller of Two Rivers
Marketing has retired. She is look-
ing forward to travelling with her
husband as she joins the ranks of
several industry colleagues and
friends who have retired.
“I have loved my work in this
industry over the past 38 years, and
it has been a great honor and pleas-
ure . . . There are many talented
individuals who drive the industry,
working for manufacturers, media,
associations, and marketing agen-
cies, and I will miss my interaction
with all of them,” she stated.
13
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
OCTOBER 2019
Curiosity,
Mars Rover,
Drills at Aberlady!
Adapted from Information by
The American Geophysical Union
and The National Aeronautics and
Space Administration
Scientists working with Curiosity,
the Mars rover, have been excited to
explore a region called "the clay-bearing
unit" sin ce bef ore the spacecraft
launched. The rover finally tasted its first
sample from this part of Mount Sharp
when it drilled a piece of bedrock nick-
named "Aberlady". The rover's drill
chewed easily through the rock, which
was so soft, the drill didn't need to use its percussive technique. This was the mission's first sample obtained using only rotation
of the drill bit.
The Aberlady sample will give the team a starting point for thinking about the clay-bearing unit. Over the course of a year,
several more drilling operations are planned, which will help the team understand what makes this region different from the
ridge behind it, and an area located higher on the mountain with a sulfate signal.
The team recently analyzed two targets with ChemCam (chemistry and camera) - the inside of the drill hole (Aberlady)
and a nearby bedrock target Mayar. They had to determine if a powdered rock sample had been collected, and whether it
was behaving as expected. Small portions of the sample were dropped onto the workspace on the SAM (sample analysis at
Mars) inlet cover. Using Mastcam (mast camera), they took images before and after these drop-offs, which helped them char-
acterize their ability to deliver portions of the sample to the rovers laboratories.
A few interesting observations were made - the drilled block lifted up slightly as the drill was retracted, there might be some
evidence of a horizontal calcium sulfate
(gypsum) vein within the drill hole, the drill
went into the rock easily, and the drill tailings
appeared to clump more than usual. Some
concern was expressed by instrument
engineers and scientists about whether
this outcrop may have penetrated into a
weak underlying layer, preventing enough
of the sample from making its way up into
the drill stem for later drop off to CheMin
(chemistry and mineralogy) and SAM.
The rover used a sample portion for
the CheMin analysis to get a better under-
standing of the material. Initial results looked great, meaning CheMin received
enough sample, and the team did not need to deliver more material. So, the team
dumped the rest of the sample on the ground where they could analyze it with
Curiosity’s remote sensing instruments. The team collected APXS (alpha particle x-
ray spectrometer) of the dump pile with two offset observations to better under-
stand any compositional variations. They also performed another CheMin integration
to further refine the mineralogical analyses for Aberlady.
With time at Aberlady coming to a close, the team focused on refining their
understanding of the composition of local rocks and drilled material. ChemCam
took measurements of the drill hole, and accompanying MAHLI (Mars hand lens
imager) images will be used to characterize a potential vein within the drilled rock.
ChemCam also targeted the edge of a large bedrock chunk, which appeared to be
uplifted during drilling.
The search for the next drill target has already started. The team discussed two
different options which are near the current workspace. These targets were
weighed against the option to head back toward a site they already passed or to
do a small walkabout to scout out other promising bedrock outcrops. While the next
drill target may only be a few feet away, the team is looking forward to wrapping up
activities at Aberlady and moving on to their next workspace.
Courtesy of the American Geophysical Union.
14
OCTOBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
The SQ submersible pump from Grundfos Pump Corporation is
extremely compact and ideal for small or restricted boreholes. At
j
ust 2.9 inches in diameter and weighing 14.8 pounds, it fits all
wells three inches or larger. It offers a number of motor protection
and wear-reducing features which make it a good choice for res-
idential wells, irrigation systems, or groundwater lowering. The SQ
pump is suitable for both continuous and intermittent operation
for a variety of applications and can be installed vertically or hor-
izontally. Low current draw and soft start allows use of smaller
gauge wire compared to traditional
four-inch motors, which can reduce
the overall cost of installation.
Grundfos Pump Corporation is a Valued
WWDR
WWDR Advertiser.
E
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V
16
OCTOBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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®
Former Gas and Oil Lab Open for Geothermal Testing
A
dapted from Information by TNO
TNO, the Netherlands Organisation for applied scientific research, announced companies active in geothermal energy
now have access to an advanced state-of-the-art laboratory in Rijswijk, South Holland. The Open Innovation Centre for Well
Technology (OIC-WT) can be used for full-scale testing and experimentation with new drilling techniques and materials under
high pressure and extreme temperatures.
The former Shell technology laboratory has been transformed into a geothermal technology innovation lab, in collaboration
with a consortium of partners including TNO, TU Delft, Utrecht University, EBN (Energie Beheer Nederland B.V.), Ministry of Economic
Affairs, the province of South Holland, the Ministry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations, and the municipality of Rijswijk.
“As a drilling company, we have a lot of R&D [research and development] knowledge and installations in-house, but the equip-
ment in this lab is unprecedented,” said Peter de Vin, director of Huisman Geo. “And that, combined with the in-depth knowledge
of two universities and TNO, makes this facility an innovation center where Dutch industry can take major steps to make geother-
mal energy a success. As far as we are concerned, things are still going too slowly. This enables us to move things up a gear.”
According to Gert-Jan Heerens of TNO, geothermal energy plays an important role in the energy transition; it is one of
the most important sources of renewable energy supplies. Geothermal energy could potentially supply about a quarter of the
country's total demand for heat. However, there is still much to be done in terms of more efficient and cost-effective drilling,
with an increasing focus on safety. In short, many technical innovations are needed. These can be developed and tested
under the most extreme conditions of high pressure and temperature, at the facility.
The consortium decided to open the facilities to any company interested in working on new methods and products. “This
will bring about ideas. Like the universities, at TNO we can make the connection between scientific knowledge and its appli-
cation in practice. In this way, together we can achieve much more at a much faster pace. Who knows, maybe we'll develop
methods or equipment here that will soon spread
worldwide,” stated Heerens.
The facilities are impressive. There is a huge
drilling installation, including a full-size rig, above
a well nearly 1640 feet deep which can be used
to test new materials and methods. The center
also has overhead cranes, hydraulic presses,
pressure vessels, piping systems for pumping
and testing liquids, multiple flow loops, and two
drill holes. Almost all underground conditions can
be realistically simulated to determine how ma-
terials and components will behave under high temperatures belowground.
The beauty of the open innovation model is companies do not have to invest in test facilities themselves. “That's just too
expensive and that's why potentially wonderful findings remain unused. Even for a well-equipped company like Huisman, this
lab is a technological land of milk and honey in this field. Not only do we want to test materials, but we are also interested in
the data that comes out of it. I am thinking, for example, of collaborating with companies that specialize in sensor technology.
By integrating sensors into the drilling process, you can drill much smarter and accurately predict when maintenance is needed.
In this way, you can reduce the costs over
the entire life span. Here in the lab, you
also meet entrepreneurs from other sec-
tors. I can see surprising combinations
happening and therefore innovations,”
explained de Vin.
The cooperation is not limited to
industry, universities and polytechnic
institutions are also welcome in the OIC-
WT. “We'll have to build about 700 geo-
thermal doublets in the long run. Now
there are less than 25 of them. And once
built, they need maintenance. But there
is no training for that in our country.
Companies that build wells are now
mainly focused on oil and gas produc-
tion. Here, students can get to know the
world of geothermal energy, conduct
research, and carry out experiments that
are impossible elsewhere. This should
also lead to acceleration,” said Heerens.
Empire State Water Well Drillers
Association Annual Meeting
January 14-15, 2020
For more information, visit us online:
www.nywelldriller.org
January 14
th
9 am - 4:30 pm Board Meeting, Variety of Classes (TBD)
4:30 - 7:30 pm Cocktail Party & Trade Show
January 15
th
9 am - noon General Membership Meeting
Turning Stone Resort Casino
Verona, NY
For Hotel Reservations: 800-771-7711
www.turningstone.com
17
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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®
OCTOBER 2019
G
E
O
“New and Improved” Sometimes Isn’t
b
y Britt Storkson
Owner, P2FlowLLC
I have an old Briggs & Stratton eight-horsepower engine. It’s a dated flathead design I use to run an
electric generator. It’s not very pretty, but it has a lot going for it: It works, and it works reliably. It starts
every time, in any weather, cold or hot. It’s really simple and does the job using very few parts. Granted,
it’s not super fuel efficient (good, but not great) and it’s fairly noisy, but overall, it works well. Why should
I change?
When new technology comes out, often the “titans of industry” get so wrapped up in the “new technology hype” they often
neglect to fully test the “new toy”. It has been reported that Boeing aircraft switched to new-technology lithium-ion batteries to
save weight in their 787 aircraft. Lithium-ion technology can store more energy pound for pound over the older lead-acid battery
technology it replaced. However, the lithium-ion technology presented problems the old style batteries didn’t - like overheating
under certain conditions.
By the time Boeing made the modifications needed to utilize the lithium-ion technology safely, whatever advantage the
new battery technology afforded was wiped out by the changes that had to be made to make the new technology safe and re-
liable. While I am not aware of Boeing reporting any numbers regarding this issue, I think it is safe to say the new technology
cost the company considerably more than the conventional components - but that should have been determined long before
it was released for sale to the public.
We need to utilize the strengths and mitigate the shortcomings of both computer and human operators. We should take
advantage of what computers are really good at, as well as what humans are really good at. Computers never get fatigued or
distracted. Computers have a great memory - they don’t forget things. Humans are superior in other areas, as well. Humans
can make “judgement calls” - making the right decision most of the time without explicit instructions.
When I’m making printed circuit boards, I carefully evaluate what does and does not need to be on the board to make
everything work. It’s easy to use five or more components when one would do the job. While often done in industry, “piling on”
is not a good practice in electronics. More is almost never better. For one thing, printed circuit board space is expensive and
“piling on” is a bad practice from the cost aspect alone. Additional components sometimes generate heat, which may require
a way to remove this heat, such as a fan. Then you need some sort of sensor to shut everything off in case the fan fails . . .
and on and on.
Without adequate evaluation and discipline, you get this domino effect where one addition often triggers three or four other
changes. When the circuit has more components, it gets more costly, which is a good reason in and of itself to keep things
simple. More components require more
testing - and the potential for more to go
wrong. In fact, most of the advances in
electronics over the last 20 years or so
havent changed the basic building
blocks t o a n y s i gn i f i ca n t d e g re e .
Microprocessor manufacturers have
been busy consolidating several func-
tions on one “chip” mostly to reduce the
costs of making them. So while the “new
and improved” part may cost roughly the
same, the additional features for the
same price give them a “leg up” on the
competition.
So remember “new and improved”
isn’t always the best way to go.
Britt
Britt Storkson may be contacted
via e-mail to michele@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
18
OCTOBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
December Issue Deadlines!
Space Reservation:
October 25
th
Display & Classified
Ad Copy:
November 1
st
Pipe
by: American Society of Civil Engineers
Design and Installation
o
f Buried Pipes
November 14-15 ~ Portland, OR
phone: 703-295-6300
www.asce.org
Pumps
by: Franklin Electric
Residential Basic
N
ovember 12-13 ~ Wilburton, OK
phone: 800-348-2420
www.franklinwater.com/more/
training/franklintech-schedule/
19
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®
OCTOBER 2019
Blasting
by: Sandvik Mining and Rock
Technology / Dyno Nobel
Quarry Academy
®
November 19-21 ~ San Antonio, TX
www.quarryacademy.com
Construction
by: Concrete Sawing & Drilling Assn
Operator Certification
November 11-15 ~ Clearwater, FL
phone: 727-577-5004
www.csda.org
Foundations
by: Pile Dynamics, Inc.
State of Practice: Quality Control &
Quality Assurance of
Deep Foundations Workshop
November 11 ~ Miami, FL
November 13 ~ Tallahassee, FL
November 15 ~ New Orleans, LA
phone: 216-831-6131
www.pile.com
Groundwater / Water Well
by: Princeton Groundwater, Inc.
Remediation Course
November 4-8 ~ Tampa, FL
phone: 813-964-0800
www.princeton-groundwater.com
by: Washington State Ground Water
Association
Driller & Pump Installer Seminar
November 9 ~ Spokane, WA
November 15 ~ Tacoma, WA
November 16 ~ Kelso, WA
phone: 360-757-1551
www.wsgwa.org
Irrigation
by: Rain Bird Academy
Training
November 4-8 ~ Redmond, OR
November 4-8 ~ Denver, CO
November 5-7 ~ Santa Fe, NM
November 11-15 ~ Irwindale, CA
November 11-15 ~ Durham, NC
November 12-14 ~ Eatontown, NJ
November 18-22 ~ Fort Myers, FL
November 18-22 ~ Boston, MA
phone: 800-498-1942
www.rainbirdservices.com
Education
Education
Connection
Connection
Ms. Bonnie,
Good morning. May I please say
thank you so very much . . . It is for
certain a total joy for us to be
included in your publication like
t
his, thank you again! I hope you all
have a wonderful day.
Cheerfully in Christ,
Laura Maurizzi
Marketing Coordinator
Baker Manufacturing Company,
LLC
Evansville, WI
Drilling Into Money Not Boring
by Mark E. Battersby
HSAs: Tax Savings and Inexpensive Worker Benefit
Since they were created in 2004, tax-advantaged Health Savings Accounts, or HSAs, have grown
into a successful multifaceted tool for employers, as well as small business owners seeking self-only
health-care plans.
Used in combination with a high-deductible health plan (HDHP), HSAs have proven to be a free-
market option that does not rely on mandates or cash subsidies. Best of all, HSAs provide a health insurance
option for the self-employed or small business owner reluctant, or unable, to afford health-care coverage other than for themselves.
The concept of HSAs is both simple and elegant: Give individuals generous tax breaks to put aside money to help pay for
their health care. This, in turn, would make it easier for employers to offer their employees affordable high-deductible health
plans. For 2019, the Internal Revenue Service defined a HDHP as any plan with a deductible of at least $1350 for an individual
or $2700 for a family.
Much like an IRA (Individual Retirement Account), HSAs benefit from three tax breaks. Both contributions and investment
income earned on the accounts are tax-free. Withdrawals are also tax-free as long as they are used for qualified health-related
expenses. After age 65, participants may withdraw funds for any purpose, although the withdrawals are treated as ordinary in-
come for tax purposes.
Funds in an HSA can, as mentioned, be used to pay deductibles and other qualified health-related expenses including
dental, vision, or other health services not covered by insurance. Money remaining in the HSA can be invested, growing year-
after-year, even if workers change jobs.
HSA participants or “owners” saw a $50 increase in the 2019 HSA contribution level to $3550 for individuals with self-only
coverage. For those with family coverage, the annual contribution level is up by $100 to $7000.
An option which should not be ignored is the small business health care tax credit (SBHCTC). The SBHCTC is available to
employers with fewer than 25 employ-
ees, pay annual wages of less than
$50,000, and that contribute a uniform
percentage of at least 50% of the premi-
um cost for employee health insurance
coverage obtained through a Small
Business Health Options Program
(SHOP) Exchange. The maximum tax
credit has been extended through 2019,
and is generally 50% of employer-paid
premiums. It can be taken for only two
years, which must be consecutive.
Advice from a tax professional
and/or plan administrator, usually a
bank, financial institution, or insurance
company, is obviously a necessity.
Mark
Mark E. Battersby may be contacted
via e-mail to michele@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
46
46
th
th
Annual
Annual
Kentucky
Kentucky
Blasting
Blasting
Conference
Conference
December 5-6
Lexington, KY
Lexington Center /
Hyatt Regency Hotel
Conference includes 2 sessions of technical presentations,
and 4 workshop sessions which can provide up to 12 hours
of continuing education for licensed blasters in Kentucky.
REVIEW the basics of blasting methods and materials.
VISIT over 50 exhibit booths and see the latest products and equipment
available.
LEARN the latest techniques and evaluate the results.
EARN continuing education hours for renewal of your blaster’s license
or certificate.
For more information send an e-mail to: kbconf@yahoo.com
or visit our website: kyblastingconference.com
20
OCTOBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
In Memoriam
Rick L. Thomas (1952~2019)
The
WWDR
WWDR Team was saddened to hear of the passing of Rick L. Thomas on August 13, 2019. He
and his wife Nancy have owned and operated T&T Carbide, Inc. in Logan, Illinois, since 1976.
Rick and Nancy were married 48 years. He loved working outside, playing with his grandkids and
grandbabies. He will be dearly missed as a loving husband, father, grandfather, brother, and friend to many.
Rick is survived by Nancy; daughter Audra; son Adam (Jane); grandchildren Kailey (Dave), Mikah
(Asa), Shay, Addyson, Remington, Lincoln, Sawyer, Ellie, Matilda, and Witten; great-grandchildren Lil Dave, Keegan, Zaedyn,
Roxzyn, Lynlee, Titus, and Kipling; brothers Garry (Sharon), Tim (Annette), and Alan (Beth); numerous nieces, nephews, and
extended family.
Lest we forget...
800-348-8809
219-326-7788
LaPorte, Indiana 46350
wwwwww..ddiieeddrriicchhddrriillll..ccoomm wwwwww..ttwwiitttteerr..ccoomm//DDiieeddrriicchhDDrriillll
wwwwww..ffaacceebbooookk..ccoomm//DDiieeddrriicchhDDrriillll//
CC
aa
ll
ll
FF
oo
rr
AA
vv
aa
ii
ll
aa
bb
ll
ee
SS
tt
oo
cc
kk
D
o
n
t
f
o
r
g
e
t
t
h
e
t
o
o
l
i
n
g
!
CUSTOMIZE
CUSTOMIZE
IT YOUR WAY
IT YOUR WAY
Your Options
Your Color
We will do our best
to accommodate
your needs…
21
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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®
OCTOBER 2019
www.starironworks.com
257 Caroline Street
Punxsutawney, PA 15767
800-927-0560 • 814-427-2555
Fax: 814-427-5164
SERVING THE WATER WELL INDUSTRY
Serving the Drilling Industry
22
OCTOBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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®
®
Copper: Bright Future - Glorious Past
Adapted from Copper Development Association, Inc.
First used by man over 10,000 years ago, copper was, for
nearly five millenia, the only known metal, thus having all the metal
applications. Initially decorative and then utilitarian, copper was, around 300 B.C.,
alloyed first with arsenic and then with tin. When the Bronze Age suddenly ended at about 1200
B.C., the interruption of international trade routes forced economy in the use of copper. From
then to now, efficiency in copper use and reuse has continued.
L
arge-scale mining of copper began in the late 1800s, primarily in the American West.
Open-pit mining techniques were developed, and the U.S. quickly became the world’s
largest copper producer. In 1877, Thomas Doolittle, a Connecticut brass mill man, devel-
oped hard-drawn copper wire strong enough to be strung overhead. When the telephone
system was commercialized, both it and the electric power grid began to con-
sume large quantities of copper wire. Similar developments occurred in the rest
of the industrialized world. From the early 1890s to the mid-1970s, annual world
consumption grew by about a factor of 30.
The U.S. copper industry consists of two main segments, producers and
fabricators. Producers products are sold mostly to fabricators, while fabricators’
products are sold to the construction industry, manufacturing industry, and the govern-
ment.
U.S. copper and copper alloy industry structure has undergone dramatic
changes over the last 10 to 20 years. Whereas the U.S. was the largest producer
and consumer of newly-mined copper, now Chile has taken the lead. The U.S.
share of world mine production is now about 18%, while Chiles share is 23%.
Today, as copper maintains its markets, this must be balanced against its
future availability. Of the world’s reserves, about one-quarter of the deposits are economically recoverable now or in the near
future. Each year about three billion pounds are withdrawn from the earth as U.S. mine production.Three key factors will influ-
ence copper supply in the future: U.S. self-sufficiency, energy efficiency, and recycling efficiency. But more copper is recovered
and put back into use from recycled material than is derived from mined ore, so copper will most likely continue its 10,000-
year history of usefulness well into the future.
M
IN
W
WDR
WWDR
p
hotos
photos
Bingham Canyon Open-Pit Copper Mine
www.starironworks.com
257 Caroline Street
Punxsutawney, PA 15767
800-927-0560 • 814-427-2555
Fax: 814-427-5164
SERVING THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY
Serving the Drilling Industry
23
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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®
OCTOBER 2019
ExxonMobil - “Carrying the Brand”
Adapted from ExxonMobil Energy Factor
The history of ExxonMobil can be charted largely by the
vehicles that have carried its cargo. The company, starting as
Standard Oil, experienced a decades-long period of growth,
ultimately forming today’s ExxonMobil. Each merger, acqui-
s
ition, or rebrand came with a colorful tale, often told through
ads and logos stamped on the sides of trucks and other
gasoline carriers.
Standard Oil Company of New York (Socony) was one
of the first to use horse-drawn tank wagons. Socony pur-
chased Gilmore Oil Company in 1948, and is one of the her-
itage companies of todays ExxonMobil. Standard Oil purchased
one-third of Vacuum Oil in 1879; the same year, Vacuum introduced the revolutionary Gargoyle
600-W Steam Cylinder Oil. In the 1930s, the Gargoyle™ brand emblazoned on shiny new gasoline trucks was symbolic of the
Socony-Vacuum Oil Company, which eventually became
Mobil Oil Corporation.
Standard Oil Company used the brand name ESSO
to market products starting in the 1900s; ExxonMobil
continues to market fuel under the ESSO brand in a
number of countries. Jersey Standard bought 50% of
Humble Oil in 1919. Based in Texas, Humble Oil provided
the fuel of choice for notorious playboy and Texan in-
ventor Howard Hughes for use in his planes. Humble Oil
was acquired by Standard Oil of New Jersey in 1959,
and in 1973, Humble Oil became Exxon USA. Mobil 1™ synthetic motor oil, born out of
Socony-Vacuum Oil’s Mobilgrease brand, has been a sponsor brand for sports like Formula 1 and truck racing since 1978.
Today’s ExxonMobil Aviation is one of the world’s largest suppliers of jet fuel for commercial airliners.
Since the ExxonMobil merger in 1999, the company has continued advancing distribution methods for fuels and products.
Gilmore Oil Horse-Drawn Carrier
Gargoyle™ Oil Truck
Anglo American Oil Truck
Humble fueling Hughes’ plane.
G
&
O
24
OCTOBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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Be Aware of Soil Contamination When Installing Soil Borings
Adapted from Information by Talon/LPE
Whether installing soil borings for an environmental investigation or geotechnical purposes, it’s important to keep an eye
out for possible instances where contamination can reach subsurface soil and / or groundwater. Contaminating soil or ground-
water can cause serious safety or legal challenges, which is why it is imperative to consider potential contamination which
may occur with soil borings.
Soil contamination could be present before a project begins, it could
potentially occur during the course of drilling, or after the bore is installed. In
any case, creating new areas of contamination, spreading existing contam-
ination, or creating a pathway for contamination should always be avoided.
It is crucial to find out as much information as possible about cur-
rent site conditions, which will help in choosing the best soil drilling
methods, so conduct a predrilling job walk with the drilling contractor.
Examples of contamination sources or conditions:
Historic use - Pesticides from farming may linger in soil long
after farming ends. Petroleum hydrocarbons and solvents may
have leaked into soil and groundwater from gas stations or home auto / equipment repair.
Underground lines and tanks - Utility location services can identify underground lines for sewage to natural gas. Fuel,
heating oil, or waste oil in underground storage tanks may be present but not visible.
Previous spills - Unusually discolored soil or distressed vegetation may be visible.
Trash - Toxic or hazardous chemicals may be present in discarded containers, which may be open or leaking.
Steps to help avoid creating new conditions of contamination on the jobsite:
Entering and exiting sites clean - Drilling equipment should arrive at the jobsite clean. An on-site cleaning station can
clean trucks or other equipment leaving the jobsite.
Geologic conditions - It is crucial to understand geologic and groundwater conditions at the jobsite.
Good housekeeping - Properly store toxic or hazardous materials.
Refueling or maintenance - Use drip pads or pans to avoid spills to the ground. Invest in a spill kit to quickly clean-up
any leak or spill.
Stormwater drainage - Stormwater runoff can contain vehicle-related chemicals; divert stormwater from soil boring
areas, or seal the top of the borehole.
After installing the borehole, plug it according to local and state regulations to prevent a pathway for contamination.
25
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®
OCTOBER 2019
E
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In Memoriam Kenneth Richard “Ken” Gross (1951~2019)
The California Groundwater Association sadly reported the loss of member Kenneth Richard “Ken” Gross
on June 27, 2019, who passed away after a brief illness. Ken was born in Lodi, California, in 1951. He grad-
uated from Galt High School in 1969, then spent six years in the National Guard.
He worked for his father drilling water wells until he started his own business in 1972. Ken ran his com-
pany, Ken Gross Water Well & Pumps, with his wife Diane until his passing. Through his business, he met many
p
eople he was happy to call friends.
Ken enjoyed spending time with family and friends. He was captain of his fishing boat in Bodega Bay, enjoying camping,
crabbing, and fishing. He was especially looking forward to teaching his grandson how to fish. Hunting and trips to Las Vegas,
Reno, and Lake Tahoe were also favorite things to do.
Ken is survived by Diane; daughter Tami (Jarrod); grandson Hudson; son-in-law Klayton; his mother and father Bonnie and
Otto; brother Keith (Gail); and a large extended family. He was preceded in death by his daughter Kendra and his brother Jeff.
A. Richard “Rick” Purchase (1944~2019)
A. Richard “Rick” Purchase of Calais, Vermont, passed away August 14, 2019, surrounded by his family
at the hospital following a sudden, acute illness. Born in Washington, D.C., in 1944, Rick was the eldest of
two sons and grew up in Montpelier, Vermont.
A steadfast Vermonter, Rick graduated high school in 1962, then attended the University of Vermont where
he earned a bachelor of science degree in political science. Soon after, he married Nancy, and they moved to
Calais, to raise their family. They had five children: Kristen (Michael), Kimberly (Robert), Bill, Lt. Col. Kathryn
(Lt. Col. Marc), and Neal (Anne); eight grandchildren Kyle (Shannin), Jack, Elle, Annabelle, Samuel, Henry, Theodore, and Elliot.
Many will remember Rick as an exceptional home builder, general contractor, and owner of Capital Builders, and later the
owner of Johnson Artesian Well Drilling and consultant with Spafford & Sons Water Wells. He was an active volunteer and
community leader, and a member of the Vermont Ground Water Association.
Rick will be remembered for his honesty, kindness, and love of family. He enjoyed gardening, caring for his well-manicured
lawn, and classic cars, particularly Ford Mustangs. Through his years of hard, dedicated work for his employees, customers,
as well as active community involvement, Rick leaves behind a large circle of lifelong friends and colleagues.
The management and staff of
WWDR
WWDR extend their condolences to Ken’s and Rick’s family, friends, and colleagues.
Lest we forget...
26
OCTOBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
is proud to be a member of these associations.
Alberta Water Well Drilling Association
Tel : 7 8 0-38 6 - 2 3 35
awwda@xplornet.com
A
rizona Water Well Association
admin@azwwa.org
www.azwwa.org
Black Hills Chapter of the ISEE
President: Doug Hoy
www.bitwconference.org
British Columbia Ground Water Assn.
Tel : 6 0 4-53 0 - 8 9 34
secretary@bcgwa.org www.bcgwa.org
California Groundwater Association
Tel : 9 1 6-23 1 - 2 1 34 F a x : 61 4 - 8 9 8-7 7 9 1
www.groundh2o.org
Concrete Sawing & Drilling Association
Tel : 7 2 7-57 7 - 5 0 04
matthew@csda.org
www.csda.org
Empire State Water Well Drillers Assn.
Tel : 3 1 5-33 9 - 8 9 60 F a x : 31 5 - 3 3 9-8 9 6 0
sue@nywelldriller.org
www.nywelldriller.org
Florida Ground Water Association
850-205-5641 Fax: 850-222-3019
djessup@executiveoffice.org
www.fgwa.org
Indiana Ground Water Assn.
Tel : 8 8 8-44 3 - 7 3 30 F a x : 76 5 - 2 3 1-4 4 3 0
ingroundwater@gmail.com
www.indianagroundwater.org
Iowa Geothermal Association
Tel : 5 1 5-22 4 - 6 4 69
info@iowageothermal.org
www.iowageothermal.org
Kentucky Groundwater Association
Tel : 6 0 6 -52 3 - 1 2 15 F a x : 86 6 - 8 9 6-0 184
www.kygwa.org
Louisiana Ground Water Association
Tel : 2 2 5 -74 4 - 4 5 54
www.lgwa.org
Michigan Ground Water Association
Tel : 8 5 5 -22 5 - 6 4 92 F a x : 61 4 - 8 9 8-7 786
www.michigangroundwater.com
Minnesota Water Well Association
Tel : 8 0 0 -33 2 - 2 1 04
www.mwwa.org
Missouri Water Well Association
Tel : 3 1 4 -97 4 - 6 9 92
Mwwa.MoWaterWellAssociation@yahoo.com
Montana Water Well Drillers Association
Tel : 4 0 6-68 6 - 3 1 68
www.mwwda.org
National Drilling Association
Tel : 8 7 7-63 2 - 4 7 48
Fax: 216-803-9900
www.nda4u.com
National Ground Water Association
Tel : 8 0 0-55 1 - 7 3 79 F a x : 61 4 - 8 9 8-7 7 8 6
www.ngwa.org
Nebraska Well Driller Association
Tel : 4 0 2-47 6 - 0 1 62
lee@h2oboy.net
www.nebraskawelldrillers.org
New Jersey Ground Water Association
barbemor@gmail.com www.njgwa.org
North Carolina Ground Water Assn.
Tel : 9 1 9-87 6 - 0 6 87 e l a i ne@ e x e c man. n e t
www.ncgwa.org
North Dakota Well Drillers Association
Tel : 7 0 1-56 7 - 4 1 26
ndwda@outlook.com • www.ndwda.com
Northern Plains Chapter of the ISEE
President: Billy Obermire
Tel : 3 0 7-68 9 - 0 0 50
www.bitwconference.org
Ohio Water Well Association, Inc.
Tel : 9 3 7-27 8 - 0 3 08 F a x : 93 7 - 2 7 8-0 3 1 7
www.ohiowaterwell.org
Oklahoma Ground Water Association
Tel : 4 0 5-20 9 - 6 4 82
josh@okgroundwater.org
www.okgroundwater.org
Ontario Groundwater Association
Tel : 5 1 9-24 5 - 7 1 94 F a x : 51 9 - 2 4 5-7 1 9 6
executivedirector@ogwa.ca
www.ogwa.ca
Pennsylvania Ground Water Association
Tel : 8 1 4-55 3 - 3 8 83
pgwaorg@gmail.com www.pgwa.org
Shallow Exploration Drillers Clinic
Tel : 4 0 2-47 2 - 7 5 50
jloomis3@unl.edu http://sedc.unl.edu
S
outh Atlantic Well Drillers “JUBILEE”
Tel : 8 5 5-98 7 - 7 4 69 F a x : 85 0 - 2 2 2-3 0 1 9
kgordon@executiveoffice.org
www.jubileewatershow.com
South Carolina Ground Water Association
Tel : 8 0 3-35 6 - 6 8 09 F a x : 80 3 - 3 5 6-6 8 2 6
scgwa@sc.rr.com www.scgwa.org
South Dakota Well Drillers Association
Tel : 6 0 5 -73 4 - 6 6 31 w w w. sdw d a . o r g
Southwest Mississippi Community College
Well Construction Technology
Tel : 6 0 1-27 6 - 3 7 38
cdunn@smcc.edu
Ten n e s s e e Wa t er Wel l A s s o ciat i o n
Tel : 8 6 5-76 1 - 4 3 63
tnwaterwellassociation@gmail.com
Tex a s A l l ian c e o f En e r g y Pr o d u c e rs
Tel : 9 4 0-72 3 - 4 1 31 F a x : 94 0 - 7 2 3-4 1 3 2
joannb@texasalliance.org
www.texasalliance.org
Tex a s G roun d Wat e r A s s oci a t i o n
Tel : 5 1 2-47 2 - 7 4 37 F a x : 51 2 - 4 7 2-0 5 3 7
drobbins@twca.org www.tgwa.org
Utah Ground Water Association
Tel : 8 0 1 -54 1 - 7 2 59
www.utahgroundwater.org
Vermont Ground Water Association
Ken White, President: 802-738-8400
kwhite.vaw@gmail.com
Margaret Laggis, Executive Secretary
laggistics@comcast.net
Virginia Water Well Association
Tel : 8 0 4-38 7 - 8 3 95 F a x : 80 4 - 3 0 2-7 9 7 8
info@vawaterwellassociation.org
www.vawaterwellassociation.org
Your
WWDR Team
WWDR Team is working on the
2020 Marketing Guide!
Let our Public Relations Professionals
create a personlized marketing plan
for your business in 2020.
850-547-0102
Ed@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
27
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
OCTOBER 2019
28
OCTOBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
AEM - Leadership for Over a Century
A
dapted from Association of Equipment Manufacturers
The Association of Equipment Manufacturers’ (AEM)
robust history began 125 years ago from a unique vantage point
- its industry segments came together to create a fundamentally more powerful
voice and advocate for the off-road equipment manufacturing industry. For more than a
century, the AEM has provided a manufacturer forum for industry-wide action transcend-
ing individual member company size, product line, or individual business concerns. Companies
participating in AEM work together for the betterment of the industry and public needs
at the state, national, provincial, and international levels.
A
EM built on the successes and continued the
legacy of its founding groups - the Construction Industry
Manufacturers Association (CIMA) and the Equipment
Manufacturers Institute (EMI). Both groups had a common goal - advocating for better roads
that brought products to market faster, safer, and more efficiently. Today, AEM continues to
make noise in Washington, and a key issue is still the need for a superior infrastructure sys-
tem for improved productivity and quality of life.
Let’s take a trip back in time to view AEM’s significant milestones and contributions:
3 1894 - National Association of Agricultural Implement and Vehicle Manufacturers
(NAAIVM) was established. Several name changes followed to reflect shifts in industry.
3 1911 - The first formal meeting of what eventually became CIMA was a November gathering of the National Association
of Material and Machinery Manufacturers (NAMMM).
3 1948 - American Road Builders Association sponsored the Road Show, predecessor of today’s CONEXPO-CON/AGG.
The first Road Show at Soldier Field in Chicago, Illinois, post World War II was larger and more diverse than any previous
shows.
3 1956 - The “Combined Biennial Show,” predecessor of CON/AGG, was held at Chicago Coliseum.
3 1960s - In 1966, the forerunner of International Construction & Utility Equipment Exposition (ICUEE), known as the “Elburn
Show,” was held in a field in Elburn, Illinois. Later in 1969, CIMA introduced its first safety
manual.
3 1970s - CIMA broadened its membership to include companies from around the world
in recognition of the increasingly global scope of the industry.
3 1980s - EMI became ICUEE show owner and producer after providing industry direc-
tion and was first held in Louisville, Kentucky, in 1987. The Farm and Industrial Equipment
Institute (formerly NAAIVM) made their final name change to the Equipment Manufacturers
Institute in 1989.
3 1990s - In 1997, CIMA opened an office in
China. CONEXPO-CON/AGG became the United
States’ largest trade show across all industries in1999.
3 2000+ - In 2001, World of Asphalt was first held and rotated between cities in
the United States. International Fluid Power Exposition (IFPE) was colocated with
CONEXPO-CON/AGG in 2002. Previously, the show was held in Chicago, begin-
ning in 1984. Additionally, the CIMA and Equipment Manufacturers Institute consoli-
dated into the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM). Branching out in
2004, AEM opened its Canadian office. In 2015, CONEXPO -CON/AGG in Latin America
was held for the first time in Santiago, Chile. In 2017, the “Thinking Forward” event
series introduced members to a vision of the future as they prepare to face critical
challenges to their busnesses. AEM acquired data analytics company Hargrove &
Associates in 2018. Most recently in 2019, AEM became a partner and member of Commodity Classic’s management
committee.
As AEM celebrates its past leader-
ship success, the association remembers
its basic tenets of information, connec-
tion, insight, and action as it looks for-
ward to the next 125 years.
Make plans to attend the
2020 CONEXPO-CON/AGG
in Las Vegas, Nevada,
March 10-14.
C
&
G
WWDR
WWDR
photo of CONEXPO-CON/AGG in
2017.
Don’t Miss This Great Opportunity!
Call Now: 850-547-0102
Annual Buyers Meet Sellers!
Printed in the December issue and available online
(with a direct link
to your website) all year long, plus
trade show distribution.
All for one low price!
29
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
OCTOBER 2019
Notes from the Groundwater Guy
by Thomas E. Ballard, P.G., C.H.G.
Southeast Hydrogeology, PLLC
Common Causes of Well Failure - Well Design and Construction
We look at many examples of problem wells around the country, and some common themes stand
out. One of the most common causes of well failure is in the well design and construction process. The
six main areas where we see issues with well construction and design are:
1. Well Seals: Many wells are constructed using state standards as de facto construction standards when geology should
really be the guide. We find that problems with things like nitrates and total coliform are often directly traceable to inade-
quate seal depth.
2. Screen and Casing Materials: It may seem like a great idea to save money on a well using low-carbon steel casing
and stainless steel screen, but you are really setting yourself up for galvanic corrosion of the low-carbon steel, substantially
shortening the life span of the well. Using dissimilar metals in a well without a dielectric coupling.
3. Screen and Gravel Size: The wrong choices here can lead to a sanding well if the screen openings are too large and
the gravel not sized appropriately for the screen. Similarly, too small of a screen opening can lead to an inefficient well
which is also challenging to develop properly.
4. Bridging Issues: Installation of gravel pack during well construction can result in voids due to bridging, which can result
in later sanding issues. Settling can have a similar effect, if inadequate gravel is placed over the top of the upper screen
section, settles during development, and well use causes the top of the gravel to drop below the top of the upper screen
section.
5. Welds: Welds are a common point of failure due to preferential corrosion of welds due to differences in metal types.
Video logs of wells should be conducted after well completion to verify construction, and later video logs should pay at-
tention to welds to check for corrosion issues.
6. Plumbness and Alignment: A well that is not straight and plumb will often have problems with construction and pump
operation, although submersible pumps can be a bit more tolerant of well deviation than turbine pumps.
Most of these issues can be addressed by paying attention to the geology while drilling or, even better, understanding the
geology and aquifer characteristics at the well location prior to drilling. A preliminary well design modified by geologic conditions
encountered during drilling, is often the most effective approach.
Tom Tom Ballard may be contacted via e-mail to michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
W
T
R
Ten Geothermal Projects Awarded Funding
Information Provided by the U.S. Department of Energy
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is awarding ten new projects up to $5.5 million to apply machine learning techniques
to geothermal exploration projects. It is believed machine learning could help locate geothermal resources by using advanced
algorithms to identify patterns from data. In addition to improving success rates in exploratory drilling, machine learning could
also lead to greater efficiency in plant operations and lower the overall costs for geothermal energy.
The selected projects include:
j
Colorado School of Mines will apply machine learning techniques to analyze remote-sensing images, with the goal of
developing a process to identify blind geothermal resources based on surface characteristics. The school will also develop
a methodology to automatically label data from hyperspectral images of Brady’s Hot Springs, Desert Rock, and the Salton
Sea.
j
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing and applying
new machine learning techniques to a multiphysics (magnetotelluric and seis-
mic) dataset from the Raft River geothermal field to better identify and target
fracture zones for drilling production wells.
j
Los Alamos National Laboratory will be developing an extendable, open
source cloud-based machine learning framework called GTCloud (GeoThermal
Cloud) which will incorporate local, regional, and continental scale geother-
mal data to estimate risk, cost, and thermal power production outputs for
geothermal exploration.
j
National Renewable Energy Laboratory is hoping to improve geothermal reservoir management by using machine
learning in conjunction with physics-based subsurface flow paths and interwell connectivity models.
j
Pennsylvania State University is planning to use machine learning methodologies to study microearthquakes and
their linkages to probable zones of permeability, as well as the risks associated with induced seismicity in geothermal
development. The project team has demonstrated significant success in predicting earthquakes at the laboratory scale,
proving passive seismic signals contain information on the evolution of stress and fractures in the subsurface.
j
University of Arizona will use its DOE funding to build a single web-based platform to allow geothermal researchers
and developers access to continuously growing scientific and exploration data. The project will use a computer program
to analyze the grammatical and visual relationships of words in the texts (e.g., noun, adjective) and use these relationships
to build structured (e.g., spreadsheets) datasets for geothermal research.
j
University of Houston is developing a method to automatically detect subsurface fault/fracture zones from seismic im-
ages, and reliably characterize the fractures with the fault/fracture zones using the ‘double-beam’ method. Investigators
have already shown success using the techniques in gas and oil settings and will adapt them to the more difficult geother-
mal environment.
j
University of Nevada is actually building on a prior project focused on defining geothermal ‘play fairways’ in Nevada;
the previous project used several machine learning techniques to identify regions with high geothermal potential. However,
it relied to some degree on expert opinion where training data was lacking. This application addresses the shortcoming
through the introduction of an additional 100 training sites and the addition of an industry partner with extensive proprietary
datasets.
j
University of Southern California is
developing data-driven predictive mod-
els for the integration of real-time fault
detection and diagnosis. These models
will be integrated by using predictive
control algorithms to improve the effi-
ciency of energy production operations
in a geothermal power plant.
j
Upflow Limited: Will make multiple
decades of closely guarded production
data from one of the world’s longest
operating geothermal fields in Taupo,
New Zealand. This data will be com-
bined with the archives from the largest
geothermal company operating in the
U.S. The models developed from this
massive data store will enable the cre-
ation of a prediction/recommendation
engine to help operators improve plant
availability.
The Raft River geothermal project
i
s located in Cassia County, Idaho.
G
E
O
Information: Joel Walton
jwalton022@aol.com • (225) 744-4554
www.lgwa.org
January 9, 2020
Paragon Casino - Marksville, LA
Tower or Atrium hotel rooms call (800) 642-7777 and refer to
LGWA Annual 2020 conference use code
LGWA 01G
Registration starts at 7 am, Seminars start at 8 am
(Cocktail hour, dinner, and BINGO at 6 pm
the night before the convention [the 8th].)
LLoouuiissiiaannaa GGrroouunndd WWaatteerr AAssssoocciiaattiioonn
LLoouuiissiiaannaa GGrroouunndd WWaatteerr AAssssoocciiaattiioonn
CCoonnvveennttiioonn && TTrraaddee SShhooww
CCoonnvveennttiioonn && TTrraaddee SShhooww
30
OCTOBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
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Remount
Remount
s • Rebuilds • Overhauls
s Rebuilds Overhauls
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31
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
OCTOBER 2019
Through the Back Door!
by Jim Kuebelbeck
Pseudo-Science
Misconceptions about the practice of water dowsing persist. In my early years of locating satisfactory
groundwater supplies by my dowsing methods, an article about my unusual success in locating water
supplies in areas where only dry holes had been drilled previously, appeared in our little two-page home-
town newspaper. Little could I have realized, the article would somehow be forwarded to someone asso-
ciated with a well-respected national water well association. This person took issue with the content of the article and wrote
to me personally. In his letter, he wrote that I was simply “one of those uneducated mentally deluded 'water witchers' who still
believed in superstitious folklore!” Two weeks after I received his letter, my local area of Minnesota was flooded with little
brochures decrying the practice of water dowsing. The title on the pamphlets read, “Before You Hire a Water Witch.” The
brochures were everywhere - in grocery stores, service stations, banks, restaurants, and anywhere people were likely to see
them.
Recently, one of my young granddaughters called me saying, “Grandpa, you're not going to believe this, but in our science
class today we were studying about water and water sources. On one of the pages in our science book there was a picture
of someone holding a dowsing rod, and underneath the picture in large letters the caption read, 'WATER DOWSING - A
PSEUDO-SCIENCE'. Our teacher elaborated on the subject of pseudo-science a bit, and then went on to a different subject.
I was afraid to say anything to her in front of the class, but I'm going to sit down
tonight and write her a letter, telling her I think our science book is wrong. Do you
think it would be okay?”
I told her if someone has a belief about something, it's hard to convince them
otherwise, especially when what they believe to be true is reaffirmed by what they
read in a book. I told her she could feel free to write her teacher if she wanted to,
but it was unlikely she was going to change her teacher's mind about something writ-
ten in the textbook, and unless someone would be sufficiently motivated to investi-
gate further on a particular subject about which they know little, the person is likely
going to continue believing whatever has been ingrained into their personal belief
system.
For an eighth grader, the sensible letter she subsequently wrote to her teacher
was so tactful and well-written, I was quite impressed, as was her teacher. Later in the week, her teacher told the class she
had no knowledge about the practice of water dowsing until she received my granddaughter's letter, and had since done some
research on the subject. She told the students that in the course of her recent research, she had come across credible tes-
timonials from many landowners who had been helped by the successful water dowsing methods of one of her student's
grandfather. This surprisingly open-minded teacher then said she would like to know more about the practice of water dows-
ing, and asked my granddaughter if her grandfather might be willing to speak to her class about his unusual occupation. I
might consider doing that.
I do realize the content of many textbooks become outdated over time as new discoveries are made, and it sometimes
takes years before textbooks are revised, but in this particular case I was quite shocked to discover what was published in
my granddaughter's current textbook
was “word for word” exactly what had
been printed in the misleading brochures
distributed in my area of Minnesota
about 50 years ago! Life does go on.
The statements and comments in
this article are based on information and
references believed to be true and fac-
tual. If you have any questions or com-
ments, please forward them to me in
care of
WWDR
WWDR.
Jim
Jim Kuebelbeck may be contacted
via e-mail to michele@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
32
OCTOBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
Congratulations to:
Congratulations to:
Gail Ezepek
Gail Ezepek
IGSHPA
IGSHPA
Stillwater, OK
Stillwater, OK
Winner for September!
Winner for September!
Time for a Little Fun!
September Puzzle Solution:
Boshart Industries
Acker Drill Company
Win a prize! Send your
completed puzzle to:
WWDR
WWDR PO Box 660
Bonifay, FL 32425
or fax to: 850-547-0329
Can you identify which ads in this
issue these two photos came from?
W
T
R
Marcel,
I certainly appreciate you guys
. . . ABOVE AND BEYOND!
Thanks!!!
Daniel Hidalgo
Marketing Manager
Flomatic
®
Glens Falls, NY
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33
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OCTOBER 2019
Canada Explores for Potential Rare Earth Elements
Adapted from Information by Defense Metals Corp.
Canadian company Defense Metals Corp. has received a mineral exploration permit from the British Columbia Ministry of
Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources which allows up to 51 separate drill site locations at the Wicheeda Rare Earth Element
(REE) Property. The property is located roughly 50 miles northeast of Prince George, British Columbia, and is expected to
contain two specific rare earth minerals, monazite and bastnasite-parisite.
The permit will allow the company to complete additional drilling this
year. The primary goal of the drill program is to:
k
Define the Wicheeda carbonatite intrusion hosting the REE mineral-
ization of the deposit. Carbonatites are intrusive igneous rocks, which
may contain economic or anomalous concentrations of REEs.
k Provide REE-mineralized samples for additional metallurgical testing
to establish continuity of the process flow-sheet currently being deter-
mined by SGS Canada Inc.
k Explore identified soil geochemical REE and airborne radiometric
anomalies which have not been drill
tested. These may represent exten-
sions or additional targets separate
from the Wicheeda Deposit.
Craig Taylor, CEO of Defense
Metals said, “With the very encouraging initial results from our bulk sample testing,
we look forward to drilling additional core holes to further delineate the Wicheeda
REE Deposit, in addition to evaluating existing high-priority REE exploration targets
within the property.”
Geologically, the property is located in the Foreland Belt and within the Rocky
Mountain Trench, a major continental geologic feature. The Foreland Belt contains
part of a large alkaline igneous area, stretching from the Canadian Cordillera to the
southwestern United States, which includes several carbonatite and alkaline intrusive
complexes hosting the Aley, Rock Canyon, and Wicheeda Deposits.
Close-up of a drill core sample from the
Wicheeda REE property.
EXB
34
OCTOBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
35
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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®
OCTOBER 2019
JUBILEE 2019 D
e
a
l
m
a
k
e
r
s
The
W
WDR
WWDR Team got
t
his great photo of the
s
miling KC Drilling family
of Zebulon, Georgia, with
t
heir new water truck from
Rose-Wall Manufacturing
of Greenfield, Indiana.
Rose-Wall
Manufacturing
Send your deals to: michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
T
his water truck from Rose-
Wall Manufacturing of Greenfield,
I
ndiana, went to Craig Geotechnical
Drilling in Mays Landing, New
Jersey.
WWDR
WWDR photo.
Rose-Wall
Manufacturing
TDH Manufacturing
GEFCO, Inc.
K
C Drilling also took
d
elivery of this 40K rig
from GEFCO, Inc. of Enid,
O
klahoma.
The TDH Manufacturing Team from
H
aslet, Texas, was pleased to deliver this
6
X2 pump hoist to the JUBILEE 2019
event for the Rodgers Well Drilling crew
f
rom Greenwood, South Carolina.
Most Complete Opalized
Dinosaur Discovered in Australia
Adapted from Information by the
University of New England and the Australian Opal Centre
Scientists have discovered unique fossils from an underground opal mine near Lightning
Ridge in New South Wales, Australia. These fossils include remains from a herd of dinosaurs,
a new dinosaur species, and the world's most complete opalized dinosaur.
Dr. Phil Bell, lead researcher from the University of New England in Armidale, was
stunned by the number of bones found. “We initially assumed it was a single skeleton, but when I started looking at some of
the bones, I realized that we had four scapulae (shoulder blades) all from different sized
animals.” This is the first dinosaur herd to be discovered in Australia.
The bones were found in the 1980s by opal miner Robert Foster at the Sheepyard
Opal Field, near Lightning Ridge. Scientists from the Australian Museum in Sydney,
helped excavate the fossils, but the bones were not studied until they were donated to
the Australian Opal Centre by Robert's children, Gregory and Joanne Foster, in 2015.
The new dinosaur is called Fostoria (named for Foster) dhimbangunmal (pro-
nounced bim-baan goon-mal), which means sheepyard in the local language.
“There are about 60 opalized bones from one adult dinosaur, including part of the
braincase, and bones from at least another three animals,” said Dr. Bell.
Altogether, parts of four Fostoria skeletons were unearthed, ranging from small ju-
veniles, to larger animals which may have been about 16 feet in length, suggesting
they were part of a small herd or family.
Jenni Brammall, paleontologist and special projects officer of the Australian Opal
Centre said, “Fostoria has given us the most complete opalized dinosaur skeleton in
the world. Partial skeletons of extinct swimming reptiles have been found at other
Australian opal fields, but for opalized dinosaurs, we generally have only a single bone
or tooth or in rare instances, a few bones. To recover dozens of bones from the one
skeleton is a first.”
The discovery comes on the heels of a new small plant-eating dinosaur also dis-
covered near Lightning Ridge, called Weewarrasaurus pobeni, which was named by Dr. Bell and colleagues late last year.
“The rate of discovery is astounding. On average, there’s at least one new dinosaur discovered around the world every
week,” he stated. “With more paleontologists and scientists looking further afield than ever before, it’s an exciting time for
dinosaur lovers everywhere, especially in Australia.”
Editors Note: In between our print issues, the
WWDR
WWDR Team prepares an electronic newsletter called
E-News Flash
E-News Flash.
Based on readership, this was the most popular
E-News Flash
E-News Flash article of the month. Get in on the action and subscribe today at:
www.worldwidedrillingresource.com
MI
N
A toe bone of Fostoria preserved in opal.
Photo by Robert A. Smith courtesy of
Australian Opal Centre.
36
OCTOBER 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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®
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Industry Announcements
Grundfos Canada, the Canadian operation of the Danish-based pump manufacturer, recently held a ceremonial ground-
breaking of a $3.5 million expansion at the firm’s Oakville, Ontario, headquarters,
effectively doubling the warehousing capacity of its current site. The facility expansion
will increase the companys warehousing and service capabilities to 48,000 square feet.
The expansion will also allow Grundfos to provide new skilled job and appren-
ticeship opportunities for those living in the surrounding community.
The expansion is expected to be complete by July 2020.
Together with LKAB, a key Sustainable Intelligent Mining Systems (SIMS)
project partner,
Epiroc is introducing a new solution to installing long-term rock
bolts in poor rock conditions.
Epiroc worked hand in hand with a leading bolt and chemical supplier to create
a bolting system addressing the issue. The result is an integrated, pumpable,
two-component resin system which can be used with a Self-Drilling Anchor (SDA)
style bolt in tougher ground conditions or alternately with a two-step hollow bolt
in more moderate ground conditions.
The integrated pumpable resin system from Epiroc is designed to be used
on the mechanized bolting machines Boltec M and Boltec E models.
Blackadar Insurance Company, turned 40 this year! During a dinner celebration to mark the anniversary, company
Founder Don Blackadar and his wife Anne spoke to the Team about the company’s origin and
how he would sell insurance in the morning while handling customer service and bookkeeping
in the evening, until he was able to hire employees. One of those employees, Lorrie Partridge,
became owner and president of the company. Lorrie thanked past and present employees for their
contributions. She also reminded those in attendance, throughout all the changes in the past 40
years, one thing has remained, the need for insurance and quality customer service. With the
Team the company has assembled, the future looks bright and successful for Blackadar Insurance
Company.
Keep the Airport Open
Adapted from Information by Directional Technologies, Inc.
How do you remediate beneath an active airport taxiway without interfering with
commercial airliners and United States Air Force cargo planes crossing through
your work area at 60 miles per hour? The Department of Defense (DoD) was faced
with this exact problem at a site impacted with jet fuel.
Since 1992, active remediation of jet fuel plumes at a joint international airport
and Air Force base in the Southeast has been ongoing. The majority of nonaque-
ous phase liquid (NAPL) from the subsurface has been removed by a free product
recovery system consisting of recovery trenches and vertical recovery wells.
However, residual contamination resulting in dissolved concentrations of jet fuel
chemicals above the state regulator’s cleanup criteria were still present beneath the taxiway and aircraft parking areas.
To address the remaining dissolved hydrocarbon concentrations, installation of an ozone / air sparge system was suggested
with vertical sparging points, but the proposed vertical system would limit the use of the taxiway and aircraft parking areas.
Since the project needed a solution with minimal disturbance to site operations, FPM Remediations, Inc. proposed an alternative
plan using horizontal biosparging wells to remediate the target area.
In areas of historic free product occurrence, a total of three horizontal biosparging wells were installed just above a clay layer
to depths of approximately 17 feet. The goal of the horizontal wells was to influence a lateral distance of 30-40 feet with oxygenated
groundwater, which would stimulate bacterial growth in the subsurface for biodegradation of residual chemicals of concern.
The three horizontal wells were constructed with 180-320 feet of three-inch diameter high-density polyethylene (HDPE)
well screen designed with longitudinal slotting at custom spacing, and the remediation system was comprised of a trailer-
enclosed air compressor. Based on previous experience with FPM at similar sites, Directional Technologies was selected to
carry out horizontal environmental directional drilling and horizontal biosparge well installation. The horizontal well paths went
underneath the active taxiway and aircraft parking area to the target air delivery locations.
To conduct work at the site, FPM performed months of coordination with the DoD and Federal Aviation Administration prior
to mobilization. Site access permits, worker security clearances, as well as specialized worker training and certifications were
required to access the aircraft taxiway and other secured areas. While the environmental directional drilling was being performed,
the taxiway was never shut down, so air traffic continued to move freely at the site, satisfying the requirements of the DoD.
DIR
Tales from the Field
by Jeremy C. Wire
G
eoconsultants, Inc.
A Warm Well Almost Gets Us in Hot Water
A client was planning a vineyard in our California Coast Ranges where previous experience dictated
a drilling depth of no more than about 700 feet. However, groundwater levels were declining, and some-
what deeper drilling only found relatively thick sections of clay, and the water in any of the accompanying
thin sand units did not possess particularly good quality. In addition, the boron concentration was relatively high, not favorable
for grapes. Our client was determined to develop a suitable groundwater supply, so why not drill a very deep well, say to 1800 feet
and take a chance? Logs of some old gas and oil exploratory wells in the region suggested there might be a thick sand section
below a depth of about 1200 feet, but overall water quality could not be determined with any certainty from available data.
A location was selected, and test drilling revealed a sand about 900 feet deep and another thick section of sand from
about 1200-1800 feet in depth. Some in-hole water sampling indicated the shallow interval contained excessive boron, but
several tests in the deeper section found water of suitable quality. A large-diameter irrigation well was constructed to a depth
of about 1800 feet and produced several
thousand gallons per minute, and the
water was very warm, about 120ºF
(49ºC). Warm groundwater at depth is
not rare in this region. The location was
about eight miles away from an area
known for its thermal springs, and the
observed temperature was anomalous,
but not unusual considering the regional
geothermal gradient.
Several months later, we received a
call from an engineer with the oil, gas,
and geothermal division of the State
Department of Conservation. He asked
if we had been involved as a consultant
in the project, which we acknowledged.
He then stated the permit for the well
should have been obtained from his
department, and there could be negative
consequences for whoever had been
issued the permit, including the profes-
sional drilling contractor. We noted the
permit had been provided by the local
county Environmental Health Department,
and no questions were apparently
raised that this location could result in a
well which could be classified as strictly
“geothermal”. After some further discus-
sion, it was agreed we would send the
agency all the logs and related construc-
tion data for the well for their review.
This must have provided evidence that
this was not truly a “geothermal” well, as
we never heard anything more from the
agency regarding this possible classifi-
cation.
Since that time, we have driven past
the vineyard several times, and the
grapes seem to be thriving quite nicely
on this very warm water.
Jeremy
Jeremy Wire may be contacted
via e-mail to michele@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
d
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37
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
OCTOBER 2019
G
E
O
Canada Tests New Commercial-
Scale Geothermal Possibilities
Adapted from Information by Eavor Technologies, Inc.
Eavor Technologies, Inc. has begun construction of its demonstration
facility, Eavor-Lite™. The first two wells were drilled in August and are expect-
ed to be connected later this month. This is the first step in the construction of
the $10 million facility located near Rocky Mountain House, Alberta, Canada.
Eavor-Lite™ will demonstrate and showcase Eavor’s unique and propri-
etary design elements at a near commercial scale. The demonstration will pro-
vide validation of Eavors commercial opportunities at home and around the
world. Several national, international corporate, technical, and governmental
delegations are planning to visit the demonstration site to meet with Eavor’s
technical team and partners.
The Eavor-Lite™ Demonstration Project’s closed-loop system consists of
a large U-tube shaped well, several multilateral horizontal wellbores, and a pipeline connecting the sites on surface. Two
drilling rigs will be operated simultaneously from both sites and used to intersect the multilateral wellbores at depth.
The test facility on the surface will measure the system’s performance data. Once completed, the Eavor-Lite™ facility will
provide a test facility for advanced operating fluids and other processes currently under development.
As a completely closed-loop system, there is no hydrofracturing, greenhouse gas emissions, earthquake risk, water use,
produced brine or solids, and no aquifer contamination. The system circulates a harmless working fluid which is isolated from
the environment in a closed circuit. The fluid transfers heat from underground rocks to the surface. Unlike traditional geother-
mal power projects, this system is not reliant on volcanic temperatures, it uses common rock temperatures. This could poten-
tially reduce exploration costs for future geothermal power projects.
Earlier this year, the Canadian government announced it will provide $6.7 million in federal funding to support this next generation
of geothermal engineering. “This innovative project demonstrates that we can build upon, and transfer, expertise from the oil and
gas sector to supply cleaner forms of energy, leading to potential new export markets for Canada. The Government of Canada
will continue to make smart investments in research and innovation to develop new clean energy technologies, meet our cli-
mate goals, and create economic growth that benefits everyone,” said Canada’s Minister of Natural Resources Amarjeet Sohi.
The surface facility and initial testing is expected to be completed by the end of the year.
38
OCTOBER 2019
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Open the Doorway to all the
Event Photos during
South Atlantic JUBILEE 2019
To see all the photos from this event, go to www.worldwidedrillingresource.com
Feel free to download at will and print the photo(s) of your choice.
Compliments of
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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®
.
Photos are copyrighted and released for personal use only - no commercial use permitted.
C
&
G
39OCTOBER 2019
Quality Built
From Experience
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www.tdhmfg.com
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pump hoists just got better with the new
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40
OCTOBER 2019
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The “Idiots” Corner
b
y “Billy Bob Smith”
I don’t care if you are in your 20s and single, or in your 80s and living in la-la land with your perfect
lifelong spouse/partner, if you are divorced, widowed, or whatever else you could be. Over the past
few years, I have been reviewing various websites and social media groups (looking for my perfect
match) that represent people looking for better or more fulfilling relationships, and I have to tell you,
some of the things on these idiots’ lists for the perfect date, partner, mate, or spouse are just (I’m not
sure how to say this and be respectful - so I’ll just go with), over the edge. As we approach another hol-
iday season, many people who are alone and don’t want to be at this time of the year will seem to do anything, sacrifice any-
thing, or accept anything just to have some company for the holidays or beyond. But I digress.
So let me get to my point of this article - the stupid things many people have on their want (or must-have) lists they need
to find for Mr. or Ms. Perfect Match, life partner, whatever. By the way, I didn’t make any of the following items up, they were
all on someone’s list (and a few of the actual people I met and had coffee with) and yes, I kept items off the list - the ones that
were obviously coming from the men or the women. I didn’t want to start an uprising about how I am (well, let’s just say - not
nice, prejudiced, anti- anything or anti- everything). Got the picture? And NO, I am not going to reference any particular source,
social media, or website. (I don’t want to get fired). So here is a partial list. (I have decided not to give you my remarks or com-
ments on any of these items as I don’t want to eliminate myself from your list - laugh!)
Must love Yorkies. Must be taller than 5’10” Must love to take naps.
Must never interrupt me. Must love coffee. Must have no emotional baggage.
Must not die before me. Must always be on time. Must be financially stable for life.
Must not be too political. Must never have bad breath. Must not like sweets.
Must hate hiking. Must hate rain. Must love fish.
Must always tuck their shirts or blouses in. Must always want to take day trips to the beach every summer.
I’m sorry, I can’t go on with any more of these, but yes, I do have a much longer list accumulated. I guess maybe this is
why I spend a lot of time without a life partner who "gets me". It doesn’t matter where you are from, how old or young you are,
how smart or stupid you are, sooner or later someone isn’t going to like something about you, so my response is - good luck
finding Mr. or Ms. Perfect if you have a long list. Have any of these items on your list, or stuff that is even more stupid? Duh.
Billy Bob Contact him via e-mail to michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
Environmental Monitoring
b
y Thomas Kwader, Ph.D., P.G.
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
Hydrogeologist
Hurricanes Also Impact Shallow Water Well Supplies Near Coastlines
As I sit here writing my monthly
WWDR
WWDR article, I am listening to the Weather Channel and following
as Hurricane Dorian slams the Bahamian Islands on September 3, 2019, (also National Groundwater
Protection Day). There is so much devastation occurring to the islands, structures, and most important,
human lives. I pray for the best possible outcome, but the next few days will change these peoples’ lives forever as a result of
the 180-mile-per-hour winds crawling over the islands at 0 to 7 miles per hour.
I can’t help but also wonder about the impacts of the 15- to 20-foot storm surge inundating all of these islands and the im-
pact it will have on their main supply of potable water, which is shallow surficial aquifer. There are some reverse osmosis facil-
ities, but not enough to supply their needs. (I once helped design a shallow well system on Nassau, to provide a water source
to reconstitute hydrated powders brought from the mainland to produce milk and fruit juices.)
Geologically, the Bahamas are largely comprised of porous carbonate rock (seashells, coral, etc.). Seawater underlies
the surface at a few feet, to less than 100
feet in depth. A storm surge from the
ocean will flood the areas overlying this
thin freshwater lens and contaminate the
aquifer above drinking water standards.
For example, the recommended MCL
(maximum contaminant level) for chlo-
rides in drinking water is 250 mg/L (mil-
ligrams per liter) - which is exceeded when
freshwater is mixed with 1% of seawater
(19,000 mg/L chlorides).
The only way for the aquifer tofreshen”
or restore itself is from local rainfall over a
long period of time, which will accumulate
by gently percolating and “floating” on top of
the saltwater. Some areas will take years
to recover to pre-hurricane conditions.
“The true value of our drinking water
is realized when the well has run dry
~Anonymous
Tom
Tom Kwader may be contacted
via e-mail to michele@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
41
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OCTOBER 2019
E
N
V
The
WorldWide
WorldWide
SUPER MART
SUPER MART
has the best rates and coverage
for your classified ad.
Free online listing included!
Contact Kathy (850) 547-0102
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OCTOBER 2019
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America’s First Gold Rush
Compiled by Bonnie Love, Editor,
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
When you think about America’s Gold Rush, you probably envision the California Gold Rush
of 1848. However, the country’s first recorded gold rush actually took place along a small creek in North Carolina, and it all
began with a 12-year-old boy named Conrad.
It was 1799, the Reed family had a farm in Cabarrus County near Little Meadow Creek. One Sunday morning, Conrad
begged his parents to let him stay home from church. He wanted to go down to the creek to shoot at fish with his bow and
arrow. After a lot of pleading, his parents agreed but on the condition that he include his brother and sister in his day of adven-
ture.
For hours, the children played, shooting at fish as
they swam briskly through the creek. Then, Conrad
spotted a huge catfish lying motionless on the bottom
of the creek bed. As he pulled back the string on his
bow to take the shot, his sister shouted for him to
shoot, and he missed the fish. When he went to
recover his arrow, he discovered a bright yellow rock.
He picked it up and was shocked at how heavy it
was. It was a very pretty rock, so the children rushed
back to the house eager to show it to their parents.
John, Conrad’s father, knew it was some kind of
metal, but wasn’t sure what kind it was. He took it to
the local silversmith, who told him although he wasn’t
sure what it was, it was most likely worthless. So, the
beautiful yellow rock became the family doorstop for
the next three years.
As luck would have it, in 1802, John was heading
to Fayetteville on business, and he decided to take
the 17-pound metallic yellow doorstop to a jeweler to
see if he could figure out what kind of metal it was. The jeweler knew right away the rock was actually gold. He asked John
to leave the nugget with him so it could be fluxed (melted down). When he came back, the jeweler showed him the nugget
actually produced an eight-inch bar of gold. The jeweler bought the bar of gold for $3.50, John would later discover its true
worth. He asked his son to show him where he found the nugget, and the Reeds soon began prospecting Little Meadow
Creek.
In 1803, John Reed began the Reed Mining Operation. Other farmers heard of Reed’s good fortune and began exploring
their own creeks, and the North Carolina Gold Rush was on. In 1825, miners discovered gold was also located in veins of
white quartz, which led to underground mining in the area. Reed himself began underground mining in 1831. Gold mining
spread to nearby counties, and soon the state was leading the country in gold production. Other southern states also began
prospecting for gold. Then in January
1848, the California Gold Rush began,
and the rest is history.
The Reed Mine eventually closed in
1912, but portions of the underground
tunnels have been restored for guided
tours.In 1990, Conrad Reed was
inducted into the National Mining Hall of
Fame in Leadville, Colorado.
Celebrate 71 Years of CGA
The California Groundwater Association is reclaiming friendships
and bonds in 2019! Join us in Reno, Nevada for our 71
st
Annual Trade
Show and Convention! Classes include the 2019 NGWA McEllhiney
Lecture, VFD training, OSHA refreshers, E-logging, technology for
contractors, and MORE! There will be wine tasting, bowling, Reception,
Silent Auction, the annual Texas Hold’em tournament, and our 71
st
Annual Banquet as well. We hope you will join us.
More information and online registration can be found at:
www.groundh2o.org
October 17 - 19
Grand Sierra Resort and Casino
Reno, Nevada
43
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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OCTOBER 2019
No fee is charged for admission or tours of the Reed Mine in Midland, North
Carolina. Gold panning is available April 1 through October 31, weather permitting,
for a small fee.
Photo Courtesy of North Carolina Historic Sites.
E
X
B
December Issue
Deadlines!
Space Reservation:
October 25
th
Display & Classified
Ad Copy:
November 1
st
Joy Komatsu - A Century of Mining Solutions
Adapted from Joy Komatsu Corporation
In 1919, Joseph Joy founded Joy Machine Company in
Evansville, Indiana, where the first crawler-mounted loader was manufac-
tured in 1920, revolutionizing the industry with his mechanized mining machine. The company
moved to Franklin, Pennsylvania, in 1924. Harnischfeger Industries, later known as P&H
Mining Equipment (P&H), purchased Joy Mining Machinery, which continued to operate in-
dependently, in 1994.
Joy’s history is the firm foundation of their future.
n
1800s - In 1884, Alonzo Pawling and Henry Harnischfeger
founded Pawling & Harnischfeger (P&H) Machine and Pattern
Shop in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and later developed a product
line of earth-moving machines in 1895.
n 1900s - In 1919, Joseph Joy founded Joy Machine Company. Joy merged with Sullivan
Machine Company and LeDel Conveyor and Manufacturing Company in 1946. In the
1970s, Joy and Montabert (a French Company) collaborated. During the 1990s, P&H, Joy,
and Montabert provided new underground and hard rock mining solutions.
n 2000s - Expanding mining solutions, Joy purchased the Stamler Group in 2006, and opened its first Smart Services
center in South Africa. In 2012, P&H Mining Equipment and Joy Mining Machinery became Joy Global. Joy acquired LeTourneau
Technologies and China’s International Mining Machinery (IMM) in 2011, Canada’s MGI in 2014, and Frances Montabert in
2015. Komatsu America Corporation completed its acquisition of Joy Global, Inc. in 2017, adding the P&H, Joy, and
Montabert solutions to Komatsu’s product line.
n 2019 - Joy is celebrating 100 years of the Joy brand and innovation in underground mining.
With more than a century of mining knowledge, Joy’s durability, efficiency, and advanced
automation solutions excel in even the most challenging mining environments and provide the
lowest cost of production.The Joy brand continues to be a reliable leader in underground and hard
rock mining equipment used across the world.
J
oy 4BU Loader
P
&H Engineering Team 1907
M
IN
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OCTOBER 2019
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Do It Now
by Tim Connor
W. Clement Stone, one of the great success stories of
the previous century had a number of wonderful philosophies.
The one that has stood out the most in my life is his famous
words: “DO IT NOW.”
Procrastination is a thief. It steals from many areas in our
life such as: relationships businesses careers
dreams happiness success lifestyle financial lives
We are all on a calendar. No one knows when they get up in the morning
whether this will be their last day, and yet, many people put off calling a friend,
telling a loved one they care, growing, learning, and a host of other activities,
behaviors, and actions.
In most cases, there is no benefit to waiting. Yes, there is a necessity for
patience, faith, and trust, but the Quakers have a great saying: “Pray, and while
you pray, move your feet.”
The wise old Indian Chief Cochise put it better than I ever could. His braves
were surrounded by the Cavalry. They were outnumbered three to one when a
frenzied brave approached and asked, “What are we going to do?”
The wise old Chief responded, “We are going to attack.”
“Attack?!” cried the brave, “