Details of this unit and more from SEMCO - Page 6.
Volume 15
August 2019
2
AUGUST 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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®
4
AUGUST 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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®
Breaking News..................................................................13
Classified Section:
WorldWide SUPER MART
WorldWide SUPER MART..................48-64
Dealmakers........................................................................14
Education Connection......................................................37
Fun Page............................................................................37
Hot Off the Press.................................................................9
Industry Announcements.................................................24
News Flash........................................................................23
Obituary: Barlow, David Eugene......................................28
Obituary: Geisser, III, George John.................................28
Photo Gallery............................................................21,30,35
Product Spotlight..............................................................32
Where are you planning to go?........................................19
Who’s in the News.............................................................13
WorldWide Association Memberships
WorldWide Association Memberships................................39
WorldWide Business Directory
WorldWide Business Directory.............................10,11,12
WorldWide
WorldWide
.........6
Editorial Focus for August -
Environmental
C&G
DIR
ENV
EXB
G&O
GEO
MIN
WTR
Acker Drill Company...........................................................42
Allegheny Instruments........................................................27
America West Drilling Supply..............................................60
AMS, Inc.............................................................................35
Armstrong Machine Co., Inc. (AMCI)..................................46
Atlantic Screen & Manufacturing, Inc. (ASI)........................37
Baker Water Systems.........................................................38
Better Water Industries, Inc.................................................29
Bill Johnson Equipment Company......................................13
Bitco, Inc.............................................................................19
Bloom Mfg., Inc...................................................................44
California Groundwater Association (CGA) Convention........9
Central Mine Equipment Company (CME)..........................47
CONEXPO-CON/AGG
®
......................................................26
Drilling Equipment Sales, Inc. (DES)..................................63
Drilling Supply & Mfg (DSM)...............................................18
DRILLMAX
®
..........................................................................2
Eijkelkamp/SonicSampDrill.................................................22
Flomatic
®
Corporation.........................................................61
Foremost Industries............................................................28
GEFCO, Inc. (an Astec Industries Company).....................64
Geoprobe Systems
®
............................................................31
Geothermal Supply Company, Inc. (GSC)..........................23
Grundfos Pumps Corporation.............................................15
Industrial Test Systems (ITS), Inc.......................................30
Infinity Tool Manufacturing....................................................3
International Construction & Utility Equip. Expo (ICUEE)...62
KS Bit, Inc...........................................................................34
Merrill Mfg...........................................................................40
Mills Machine Company, Inc...............................................36
N&N Drilling Supply.............................................................20
National Drilling Association (NDA) Convention……..........16
Palmer Bit Company.............................................................8
Seametrics..........................................................................41
SEMCO, Inc..........................................................................1
SIMCO
®
Drilling Equipment...................................................4
Sonic Drill Corporation........................................................32
Star Iron Works, Inc............................................................24
Star Iron Works, Inc............................................................25
TDH Manufacturing Inc.......................................................45
Throop Rock Bit Company..................................................43
Vanair Manufacturing, Inc.....................................................7
Well-Vu, Inc.........................................................................33
Wyo-Ben, Inc......................................................................17
Advertisers
Featured Editorial:
C&G - Construction/Geotechnical
ENV - Environmental
G
&O - Shallow Gas and Oil
M
IN - Mining
D
IR - Horizontal Directional Drilling
EXB - Exploration/Blasthole
GEO - Geothermal
WTR - Water
Specialist Foundation Engineering for Düsseldorf’s....7
Storkson, Britt: Partial Failure = Total Failure..........33
The Futue of Tire Management - Intelligent Tires......44
Wilson, Jr., Robert Evans: The Un-Comfort Zone II..14
First Multilateral Well Drilled in India.........................29
A Mammoth Find.......................................................16
Rasmussen, Tim: Water For Life International........27
Kwader, Thomas: Environmental Monitoring...........32
White, Harold: Oil/Water Exploration.......................12
The World’s First Electric Autonomous Blasthole Drill..36
Wire, Jeremy C.: Tales from the Field......................46
New Model May Lead to More Efficient Hydraulic.....17
What Happened in Pittsburg County, Oklahoma?.....23
Battersby, Mark E.: Drilling Into Money Not Boring..43
Game-Changing Technology for Geothermal Drilling?...20
Connor, Tim: Get Over It..........................................29
E-News Flash
E-News Flash
Readers Choice
Readers Choice: Geothermal Power......40
Simulator Use Improves Results in North America....21
Winds of Change......................................................30
“Smith, Billy Bob”: The “Idiot’s” Corner..................38
Ballard, Thomas: Notes from the Groundwater Guy..19
Everett, Edward E.: A Consultants Perspective....25,44
Flomatic
®
~ Celebrating Their Expansion..................35
Water Wells After the Flames....................................41
5
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AUGUST 2019
P
roudly
Ma
de
in
the
Unite
d
S
ta
te
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of Ame
ric
a
-
de
liv
e
re
d
P
roudly
Ma
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in
the
Unite
d
S
ta
te
s
of Ame
ric
a
-
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liv
e
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WorldWide
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The
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ompl
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ine
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r
th
e
dr
illin
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in
dus
t
r
y
worl
dwide, owned by
drilling industry associates dedicated to bringing the most up-to-date
t
e
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h
n
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o
g
y
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M
a
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Publish
er/
C
EO/
Pre
side
nt:
Veronica I. “Ro
nn
i
e
” Jo
nes
Vice President:
Troy Cunningham
C
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f
M
a
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t
i
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g
Of
f
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ce
r:
Ed
M
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Of
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Ad
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M
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Ed
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Bo
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L
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Asso
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e
Ed
i
t
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r:
C
a
l
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b
Wh
i
t
a
ke
r
Public Relat
ions Prof
essionals:
Kat
hy Heinrich
Jan Allen
Production/Webmaster: Marcel Schimpf
Representative:
Marie Cunningham
Editorial Contributors for this month:
Tom Ballard Mark Battersby Tim Connor Edward E. Everett
Thomas Kwader
Tim Rasmussen “Billy Bob Smith” Britt Storkson
Harold White Robert Evans Wilson, Jr. Jeremy Wire
Hyd/Eng Consultant:
Thomas Kwader, Ph.D.,P.G.
Consultant:
Mary Ann Pelletier
*
Editorial contributions & advertisements include statements of fact and opinions
that are the sole responsibility of the author and/or companies and do not
necessarily imply any opinion of the owners, management, or staff of
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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Images may have been altered for clarity.
Complete advertising information may be found at:
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publication; this may occur however, due to size and space within the publication.
We regret any inconvenience this may cause our advertisers.
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r
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p
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y
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WorldWide Drilling Resource, Inc.
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Copyr
ight
2019,
WorldWide Dr
illing Resource, Inc.
Seen by countless
WorldWide
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Short, Sweet, and to the Point . . .
The days turn into weeks, turn into months, turn into years, and just seem to fly by just
when we think, “Gosh, I have all the time in the world.” Well, it’s about time we all get moving and
enjoy what is around us ~ take a walk on the beach, a
stroll through the park, a quiet walk down memory lane,
or why not just fly a kite and DREAM!
Nostalgic? Yes, it’s true, and I bet each of us do that from time
t
o time. Anything wrong with that? I say no. It’s a way of staying sane
in a world that is absolutely flying by around us. So join in.
As I sit here at my desk, its going on 5:00 p.m. Central Time, I wonder - what else can we do to let you know
just how much we care about this drilling industry and all those in it? For the life of me, I just don’t know. This
WWDR
WWDR Team works so very hard each and every day, and sometimes half the night for ways to help you.
So, I pose that question to you here and ask for your help in answering it. What else can we do?
Accept NO imitations - there is only one true
RESOURCE
RESOURCE. 850-547-0102
One more very important thing ~ I so value everyone out there in “drilling land” for dropping me personal notes.
Mrs. Lepley, yours commenting on July’s
Ronnie’s Real World, touched my heart. I know it was hard
to say and filled with emotions. May your husband Bob rest in peace, and your son, Joe find
you. I sincerely thank you. God Bless You and Keep You Safe.
Yes, the things (people) we take for granted, believing they will be there forever. How quickly they aren’t.
W
e
W
i
l
l
S
e
e
y
o
u
o
n
t
h
e
t
r
a
i
l
!
N
E
X
T
S
T
O
P
~
N
D
A
,
P
i
t
t
s
b
u
r
g
h
With pen
(computer) in hand .
. .
Ronnie, Managing
Publisher
ronnie@worldwidedrillingresource.com
~ From the Cover ~
~ From the Cover ~
Thank you to our repeat neighbor: Dreiling Pump Supply
Thank you to our repeat neighbor: Dreiling Pump Supply
Rick Dreiling - located in Fort Collins, Colorado
Rick Dreiling - located in Fort Collins, Colorado
SEMCO S15,000 Pump Hoist, 48' derrick, upper-mount drawworks, 2000-foot capacity sandreel,
hydraulic oil cooler dual fans, auxiliary hydro valve, 2-speed winch w/grooved drum, power arm,
LED light kit for mast, behind-the-cab outriggers, factory mounted on customer's 2019
Freightliner 108SD with custom flatbed.
SEMCO INC.
SEMCO INC.
PO Box 1216 7595 US Hwy 50 N
PO Box 1216 7595 US Hwy 50 N
Lamar CO 81052-1216
Lamar CO 81052-1216
719-336-9006 • Fax: 719-336-2402
719-336-9006 • Fax: 719-336-2402
E-mail: semcopumphoist@gmail.com
E-mail: semcopumphoist@gmail.com
www.SEMCOoflamar.com
www.SEMCOoflamar.com
6
AUGUST 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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Specialist Foundation Engineering
for Düsseldorf’s Tallest Residential Tower
Adapted from Information by BAUER Group
With a population of about 617,000, the North Rhine-Westphalian capital Düsseldorf
is the seventh largest city in Germany. To meet the growing demand for living space,
the UpperNord Tower, a modern residential development, is currently being built. Located
a
t the northern entrance to the city, the 390-foot-high residential tower will be the tallest
of its kind in Düsseldorf. The UpperNord Tower will have 36 floors, with the majority of
the space being used for 432 planned residential units. It will also include a variety of
restaurants on the ground floor, a three-story underground parking garage, and a five-
story hotel, which will adjoin the building.
The client, UpperNord Tower GmbH & Co. KG, a member of CG Group AG, con-
tracted the joint venture, which consists of BAUER Spezialtiefbau GmbH and Gerhard
Kliemt GmbH, to carry out a variety of specialist foundation engineering and earth
works, as well as construct the dewatering system for the impermeable retaining structure of the UpperNord Tower.
Around 19,600 square feet of shoring wall for the retaining structure was constructed using the low-vibration mixed-in-
place (MIP) method, which involves mixing the existing soil in-situ with a binding agent. A triple continuous flight auger was
used to produce a homogeneous soil concrete. By using the embedded soil as a building material, there are economic and
ecological advantages over conventional shoring, and resources are conserved. One challenge for the project was drilling to
depths of nearly 80 feet, but such depths wouldn’t have even been possible with the MIP equipment from several years ago.
An RG 25 S from RTG Rammtechnik GmbH, a subsidiary of BAUER Maschinen GmbH, was used for the MIP work. In
addition, an RG 16 was used to install 700 tons of reinforcement in the form of inserted double steel beams. This reinforcement
is another special feature of the construction project.
To secure this impressive excavation, additional anchors with three to six strands were installed. A KR 806 from KLEMM
Bohrtechnik GmbH was used in the anchoring work. A second layer of ground anchors were constructed to protect against
pressurized groundwater; however, some of the anchors will have to be removed because of conditions imposed by the city
of Düsseldorf. The project also included the scheduled removal of obstacles using a BAUER BG 40, dewatering for nine
months, as well as excavation and disposal of soil. The specialist foundation engineering and earth works project began in
December 2018, and was expected to be completed by the end of June this year.
7
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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®
AUGUST 2019
C
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Manufacturer of Red Devil Bits
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Palmer Bit Company
800-421-2487 • sales@palmerbit.com
www.palmerbit.com
The latest newly-designed bit
by Palmer Bit!
This double chevron, in a 3-wing or 4-wing
design, offers faster penetration than the
old style chevron and is more durable than
a step bit. It is performing extremely well
in medium formations and gravel.
8
AUGUST 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
9
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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®
AUGUST 2019
Sponsorship available for special position
Hot Off the Press page.
DM450 Gets the
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The DRILLMAX
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DM450 is a light-
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For a link to this website, visit:
worldwidedrillingresource.com
Celebrate 71 Years of CGA
October 17 - 19
Grand Sierra Resort and Casino
Reno, Nevada
More information and online registration
can be found at: www.groundh2o.org
The California Groundwater Association is
Reclaiming Friendships and Bonds in 2019!
Schedule of Events (Subject to Change)
Thursday October 17
t
h
:
7:30 am - 5:00 pm Registration, Badge Pickup
8:00 am - 12:00 pm NV Regulations Seminar
8:30 am Golf
12:00 - 1:00 pm Lunch (On Your Own)
1:00 - 6:00 pm Exhibitor Move-In and Set-Up
1:15 - 2:15 pm Seminar A (Well Disinfection)
1:15 - 2:15 pm Seminar B (VFD Training - Low Harmonics/Yaskawa Drives)
2:30 - 4:30 pm Seminar C (OSHA Trench/Confined Spaces/Safety and Accident
Review-Silica Rules (OSHA))
2:30 - 4:30 pm Seminar D (Basics of E-Logging)
6:00 - 11:00 pm Bowling Meet and Greet
9:30 pm Texas Hold’em Tournament
Friday October 18
th
:
7:30 am - 4:00 pm Registration, Badge Pickup
8:00 - 10:30 am Additional Exhibitor Set-Up
9:00 - 10:00 am McEllhiney Lecture (Drilling Markets must Change - Gary Hix)
10:15 - 11:15 am Water System Council (Legal Updates Nationwide - Jessie
Richardson)
11:30 am - 12:00 pm General Membership Meeting
11:00 am - 12:00 pm Vendor Lunch
12:00 - 1:00 pm Attendee Lunch
12:00 - 4:30 pm Exhibit Hall Open (Sponsored Bar from 3:00 - 4:30)
4:30 - 5:15 pm Manufacturer & Supplier Meeting
4:30 - 8:00 pm Exhibit Teardown
4:30 - 5:30 pm Past Presidents Meeting
6:00 - 6:30 pm Reception, Silent Auction (Music by Andrew Quindt)
6:45 - 10:30 pm 71st Annual Banquet, Comedians, & Live Auction
Saturday October 19
th
:
8:00 - 10:00 am Registration, Badge Pickup
8:45 - 9:45 am Seminar A (Technology for the Small Contractor)
9:00 - 11:00 am Seminar B (Engines and Emissions)
11:15 am - 2:00 pm Lunch & CGAA Luncheon Program
12:30 - 2:30 pm Seminar C (DOT Preparedness)
12:30 - 2:30 pm Seminar D (Asset Protection/Succession/Disaster Readiness)
2:45 - 4:15 pm Wine Tasting
10 AUGUST2019
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WorldWide Drilling Resource
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ZZZURFNPRUHLQWOFRP
Thinkthis
isit?Notso,
lookonthenext
page.
11
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AUGUST 2019
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Tobenoticed,
giveusacall:(850)547-0102
ore-mail:wwdr@ worldwidedrillingresource.com
12 AUGUST2019
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Oil/Water Exploration
by Harold White
I went out to do a water well site location for a new well not far out of town, less than a mile up the
mountain. The old gravel road to the place had been covered with Douglas fir trees that fell during the
snow, a wet snow that was like an ice storm but white.
You may know what a silver thaw is - rain that freezes when it hits anything and everything - streets,
power lines, sidewalks, towns, houses, everything covered with ice. It gets heavy, very heavy, causing
electric power to go off, which stops traffic and shuts down the town. The electric company fixes the
broken power poles and lines in town first, gets power to hospitals and medical facilities, then works their way out of town to
the country people who need medical help, food, and so on.
Some trees fell on houses and cut or chopped houses in half. My son Sean was lucky he’d just had some really big oak trees with
huge limbs removed from around the house before the snow happened, but a neighbor’s tree fell partially on his house. It landed on
the bedroom where he was sleeping. It made a huge noise in the night - scary, huh? That house probably would have been demolished.
When I got to the place I was going, the guy was outside. I stopped the car and met him. I mentioned about the trees that had
fallen across the road and how it must have taken a long time to cut and remove - at least 30-40 feet from the center of the road, with
a lot of pieces still left on both sides of the road. He said yes, it took along time. He had been stranded, unable to get to town for 13 days.
There was no electricity and of course trees were down everywhere. Truckloads of trees had already been hauled off before my arrival.
The man said his well was out behind the house a ways. A tree had fallen right on it, smashing the pump house which
caused the well to cave in. He said he was going to drill north of the well, about 15 feet from the existing well since there was
water everyplace on the property. The wire and plumbing were close, so he wanted us to drill there unless I said different.
My findings showed his spot to be a place I would not choose because the aquifer his pump was drawing from wasn’t
there, so I put the well site on the aquifer that feeds that well.
Harold Harold White may be contacted via e-mail to michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
EXB
New Canadian Dealer for American Augers
American Augers has named the Brandt Group of Companies the exclu-
sive dealer for American Augers and Trencor products across Canada.
Adding the full line of American Augers and Trencor products to Brandt’s
existing underground equipment offering improves Canadian support and
distribution for a complete line that covers all sizes of equipment.
The two companiesshared commitment to maximizing customer
uptime has resulted in a 24/7 support network. With American Augers’ and
Trencor’s premium-quality products and Brandt’s exceptional dealership
and parts warehouse infrastructure, Canadian contractors can expect bet-
ter-than-ever uptime even in the toughest conditions.
WHOS IN THE NEWS
WHOS IN THE NEWS
Breaking News
Breaking News
You can find additional announcements from Hole Products, the Society
for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration (SME), and Women In Mining in our
online issue at: worldwidedrillingresource.com
Send your Who’s in the News to:
Bonnie@worldwidedrillingresource.com
Alberta Water Well Drilling Association
Manuel Zeballos is bringing his
extensive experience in the mining
and explosives industry to Rockmore
International as market development
manager - Latin America.
Lorrie Partridge, president of
Blackadar Insurance Agency, pre-
sented Diana with a personalized
Silver Anniversary Award to cel-
ebrate 25 years of service to the
company.
Mark presented Carlin with the
Highest Mark 2nd Year Water Well
Driller Apprentice Award.
The Honorary Membership Award
went to Jack Whitehead and was
accepted by Mark Holland.
Celebrating our 70
th
year in business!
Complete line of Water Well and Environmental Drilling Supplies
Featuring
Casing Grips
and Elevators
that we
manufacture
Bill Johnson Equipment Company
21 S. 40th St., Phoenix, AZ 85034
(602) 275-5415
5811 NE Columbia Blvd., Portland, OR 97218
(971) 229-1288
www.billjohnsonequipment.com
13
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AUGUST 2019
The Un-Comfort Zone II
by Robert Evans Wilson, Jr.
You have a Secret Super Power
Yes, you really do have a secret super power, although it might be better described as a hidden
super power since you’re probably not aware of it, which means you’re not using it. Will this super power
get you in the next Marvel Avengers movie? Probably not, but it might help you write it.
This super power is amazing because it will enable and empower you to do many things. However,
like most “real-world” abilities, you will have to work at developing it. I’ve got to warn you, there are peo-
ple out there who do not want you to discover this power. Why do people not want you to discover your power? Because if you
use it, you might rock the boat. And what happens when you rock a boat? Yes, people fall out. Then what happens? Now you
don’t have to worry about anyone drowning, we’re just speaking figuratively here, but they will be left behind; and people don’t
like to be left behind, it makes them angry and afraid. Some of them will be eaten by sharks - figuratively speaking that is.
If you develop this power extremely well, some psychologists will say you have a mental illness, but don’t listen to them.
Don’t listen to any of the naysayers because they are just envious. They will envy you because you will recognize opportunities
they will miss. You will handle change like a boss, while they cower in fear. You won’t have to worry about going senile as you
get older. No wonder they’re envious.
What is this secret super power? It’s creativity. It is a power you were taught to suppress when you were a child. Because
of this, many people believe creativity is a gift only some people are born with, but it is actually a skill which can be redeveloped
at any age. You see, instead of being allowed to freely use your imagination, you were trained to conform. You were taught
that curiosity is dangerous; questioning authority and challenging the status quo is antisocial; listening to different viewpoints
is heresy; and experiencing new things is a waste of time. But if you want to have an innovative mind, you must do all of these.
Innovation is not just for big corporations, it’s for everyone because when you embrace the innovator’s lifestyle and open
your mind to more creative thinking, wonderful things can happen. There is nothing more satisfying than being enmeshed in
the creative process. When you create something, you develop self-confidence. The more time you spend in creative activity,
the more you will believe in yourself. The more successful you are, the more persistent you become; the more willing you are
to take risks; and the more comfortable you become with change.
To develop this skill, this super power, you must learn to get a different perspective, to see things in different ways, so you
can think different thoughts and come up with new ideas. An idea is simply combining two or more existing concepts/ideas
into something new. Your challenge will be to look for connections or patterns where no one has seen one before. If you want
to invent a better mousetrap, then start with a goal and work backward from there, to how you might make it happen.
Creativity is a critical skill in today’s constantly changing world. Intel Chairman Andrew Grove described it succinctly and
accurately when he said, “Adapt or die.” Change is all about creative destruction, a term coined in the 1940s by economist
Joseph Schumpeter, to describe what happens when a new technology makes an old technology obsolete. Creative destruction
is like a steamroller without a driver heading right toward your business, and there is nothing you can do to stop it. You can
only prepare. It’s happening faster than ever before and will only speed up. If you aren’t changing with the changes going on
around you, you’ll get left behind, and probably eaten by sharks - figuratively speaking.
You can start developing your super power by exposing yourself to new things, new experiences, and different viewpoints.
When you have new experiences, you lay down new neural pathways in your brain. In other words, you have expanded your
thinking ability and your store of knowledge - which gives you more stuff with which to create. The more of these electrical
connections you create, the less likely you’ll suffer senility as you age. Plus, when you experience new things, you stimulate
the dopamine receptors in your brain which makes you feel good. When
you experience new things with your significant other, you'll rekindle the
romantic feelings you had when your love was new, and you know where
that leads.
So take a class on a subject that makes you curious. Read a magazine
or blog on a topic you know nothing about. Eat an ethnic food you’ve never
tasted. Imagine a new use for an old product, then do it again and again.
Write with your nondominant hand. Sleep on the wrong side of the bed. Talk
like a pirate. Most of all, have fun!
Robert
Robert is an author, humorist, and innovation consultant. He works
with companies that want to be more competitive and with people who
want to think like innovators.
For more information on Robert, visit www.RobWilsonSpeaker.com
or contact him via e-mail to michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
D
e
a
l
m
a
k
e
r
s
Send your deals to:
michele@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
This 4x3 pump hoist from TDH Manufacturing of
Haslet, Texas, was delivered to Hunter Snelling of
Odenheimer Co. in Orefield, Pennsylvania.
TDH Manufacturing
14
AUGUST 2019
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A Mammoth Find
Adapted from Information by
A
rchaeological and Historical Conservancy, Inc.
The City of Cape Coral, Florida, contracted with Greeley &
Hansen to design the potable water, sanitary sewer, dual water
irrigation, storm drain, and road reconstruction for the North 2
U
tilities Extension Project. During deep utility trenching, a con-
struction crew discovered what is believed to be a bone fragment
from a mastodon or mammoth. It is believed to be a part of the
animal’s humerus bone, which is a bone in the arm running from
the shoulder to the elbow. This specific fossil would have con-
nected the humerus to the elbow, and is about one foot in length
and ten inches in width.
The fragment is considered to be at least 12,000 years old. During this period, glacial retreat led to the formation of
savannas across Florida, allowing herds of mammoth, bison, antelope, and horse to roam the peninsula.
An archaeologist from Archaeological and Historical Conservancy, Inc. (AHC) met
with project engineers and recorded all information. Since the trench had been filled be-
fore his arrival, he documented the stratigraphic profile of a lift station in close proximity
to the find. His observations suggest the bone likely came from a horizon of gray clayey
sand below several more superficial horizons of fine, poorly drained sands and clays.
Although an isolated find, fossils of this type are seldom found in isolation. A larger
fossil bed is usually found in the immediate vicinity with the fossilized remains of other
animals. AHC has worked three miles southeast of the find and recovered large quantities
of broken fossil bones, suggesting a similar bone bed deposit there as well.
Fossil bones are not uncommon in the area. However, according to the Florida Museum
of Natural History, there are only two recorded sites in the county with finds pertaining to this time period. This is likely a result
of the sites being underreported, rather than not existing, since most fossil beds are found during deeper excavations, such
as quarrying, deep utility, and lake excavations.
Although the bone is an intriguing find, its semi-mineralized state indicates it likely predates human occupation of the
area, so it does not fall under the provisions of Florida statutes relating to cultural resources.
ENV
September 26-27, 2019
Hyatt Regency Dulles
Herndon, Virginia
For more information call 877-632-4748
or visit www.nda4u.com
Save the Date
2019 NDA Convention
Exhibitor & Sponsor Opportunities are Available!
Golf Outing - President’s Dinner with Awards & Entertainment -
Presentations for CE Credits - Outdoor Rig Displays - and More...
16
AUGUST 2019
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New Model May Lead to More Efficient Hydraulic Fracturing
Adapted from Information by Los Alamos National Laboratory
a
nd the U.S. Department of Energy
The United States has been hydraulic fracturing for decades, making the country a pioneer in refining the process of extracting
gas and oil through fractures. The next step would be to learn more about how fractures work and move, which is exactly what
researchers at Northwestern University and Los Alamos National Laboratory are working on. Its latest computational model is capable
of predicting previously hidden fractures and more accurately interprets the amount of gas being released during the process.
“Our model is far more realistic than current models and software used in the industry,” said Zdeněk Bažant, McCormick
Institute professor and Walter P. Murphy professor of civil and environmental
engineering, mechanical engineering, and materials science and engineering
at Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering. “This model could help
the industry increase efficiency, decrease cost, and become more profitable.
Although the industry has seen a great deal of growth, a great deal of
the fracturing process remains a mystery. With the fractures occurring deep
underground, it’s impossible for researchers to see how fractures move and
release the gas from shale.
“This work offers improved predictive capability that enables better con-
trol of production while reducing the environmental footprint by using less
fracturing fluid,” said Hari Viswanathan, computational geoscientist at Los
Alamos National Laboratory. “It should make it possible to optimize various
parameters such as pumping rates and cycles, changes of fracturing fluid
properties such as viscosity, etc. This could lead to a greater percentage of
gas extraction from the deep shale strata, which currently stands at about
5% and rarely exceeds 15%.”
The new model used information gathered by studying the closure of
existing fractures caused by ancient tectonic events, and considering water
seepage forces not previously taken into account. Researchers were able
to develop a new mathematical and computational model showing how
branches form off vertical cracks during the fracturing process, allowing more
natural gas to be released. The model is the first to predict this branching
while being consistent with the known amount of gas released from the shale
during this process.
Classic fracture mechanics research predicted cracks which run verti-
cally from the horizontal bore, with no branches. However, these cracks
alone cannot account for the quantity of gas released during the fracturing process. In fact, the gas production rate is about
10,000 times higher than calculated from the permeability measured on extracted shale cores in the laboratory.
Other researchers previously hypothesized the hydraulic cracks connected with preexisting cracks in the shale, making it
more permeable. However, Bažant and his fellow researchers found the tectonically-produced cracks, which are about 100
million years old, must have been closed
by the viscous flow of shale under
stress. This led the team to hypothesize
the shale layer had weak layers of
microcracks along the closed cracks,
and it must have been these layers
which caused the branches to form off
the main crack. Unlike previous studies,
they also took into account the seepage
forces during diffusion of water into
porous shale. When they ran a simula-
tion of the process using this new idea of
weak layers, along with the calculation
of all the seepage forces, they discov-
ered their results matched those found
in reality.
We show, for the first time, that cracks
can branch out laterally, which would not
be possible if the shale were not porous,
Bant said. After establishing these basic
principles, researchers hope to model this
process on a larger scale.
Branching into densely spaced hydraulic cracks is an
essential process for gas and oil extraction from shale.
Although it is suspected to occur, existing mathematical
models and current software aren’t able to predict it. A
new model from Northwestern University and Los Alamos
National Laboratory presents a method to not only predict
when the branching occurs, but also how to control it.
G&O
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AUGUST 2019
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Notes from the Groundwater Guy
by Thomas E. Ballard, P.G., C.H.G.
Southeast Hydrogeology, PLLC
What Makes an Efficient Well? Part 2
In Part 1, we discussed what well efficiency is and how it is measured - but what can we do to ensure
we end up with the most efficient well possible? In general, an efficient well starts with design of the well,
but also includes construction factors.
Well design considerations include:
1. A proper well screen with sufficient open area to allow for reasonable entrance velocities and reduce the turbulent flow
of groundwater into the well;
2. Proper distribution of well screen can enhance the flow of water to the well and reduce turbulent flow and groundwater
velocity. Due to the design of the screen open areas, wire-wrap screens will be more efficient than mill slot screens;
3. Sufficient length of screen and penetration of the aquifer will allow for mainly horizontal flow to the well. Any vertical
flow component will result in head losses and reduced well efficiency; and
4. Properly sized gravel pack with gravel as spherical as possible to maximize flow into the well screen.
Well design considerations are really focused on maximizing horizontal flow of water to the well and minimizing the vertical
component which can reduce head losses and enhance efficiency. Reduction of turbulent flow to the well also enhances effi-
ciency by reducing load on the pump, as well as reducing other problems such as possible cavitation.
Well construction considerations include:
1. Proper well development is a key well construction factor as it has the net effect of increasing the permeability of the
formation surrounding the well; and
2. Proper placement of the well screen with respect to the most significant water-bearing zones in the aquifer.
As discussed previously, proper well development is one of the most significant factors in not only producing an efficient
well, but also in maximizing the capacity of the well. Time and money spent on proper well development gives a significant
“bang for the buck” investment in an efficient, quality well, yet it is often one of the most overlooked parts of the well construction
process.
Proper placement of well screen is a function of conducting an electronic log (elog) of the borehole and performing ade-
quate zone testing prior to committing to final well design plans. This allows for proper placement of screen, as well as sizing
of screen and gravel pack.
While there are a number of considerations which must be taken into account
to design and construct an efficient well, the increased capacity and reduced costs
of operating an efficient well make the process well worthwhile.
Tom
Tom Ballard may be contacted via e-mail to
michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
The 2019 National Drilling Association Convention
will be September 26-27, at the Hyatt Regency
Dulles in Herndon, Virginia. The event starts with
the Annual Joe Scribellito Jr. Memorial Golf Outing
at Herndon Centennial Golf Course on Thursday.
There is a day excursion planned for those not golfing.
Cocktails and visiting with exhibitors is from 5:00-
6:00 p.m., followed by the president’s dinner, award
presentations, entertainment, and Chinese raffle.
Friday has several presentations for continuing education credits, along with
more time to view vendor displays. A meeting of all chapters is set for 4:30 p.m.
Go to www.nda4u.com
for more information and to register.
Where are you planning to go?
How about including this show:
See more events at www.worldwidedrillingresource.com online issue.
New & Used Bits,
HDD Bits & Tools,
Drag Bits & Wings,
Bolt-On Drag Bits,
Reverse Circulation
Tools, Hole Openers,
Claw Bits, Stabilizers, Subs,
Custom Tooling & Welding,
Hammer Bits, Drill Collars,
Pipe Wipers, and Drill Pipe.
Office: (661) 834-4348
Rod Henderson / Eran Henderson
661-201-6259 • 661-330-0790
sales@bitcobits.com
www.bitcoinc.us
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W
T
R
Join
WWDR
WWDR
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Game-Changing Technology for Geothermal Drilling?
A
dapted from Information by Texas A&M University and the Geothermal Energy Association
People have been using geothermal energy for thousands of years. The indigenous people of New Zealand, the Maoris,
as well as Native Americans, used geothermal energy for cooking food, washing, bathing, warmth, preserving, ceremonial rit-
uals, and healing. Ancient Greeks and Romans enjoyed geothermal-heated spas. Prior to Mount Vesuvius erupting and de-
stroying Pompeii, people tapped the hot water from the volcano and used it to heat their buildings.
We continue to tap into the heat radiating from our planet today. Modern technology allows us to drill deep into the ground
and transform the heat underground into electricity. One of the challenges with drilling geothermal wells is the presence of
hard rocks, such as granite, which slows down the drilling process and wears down drill bits. This ultimately leads to increased
drilling time and expenses. Scientists with Texas A&M University are working on a way to resolve this issue.
A team of researchers from the J. Mike Walker '66 Department of Mechanical Engineering at Texas A&M University is cur-
rently developing new drilling technology to make drilling geothermal wells more efficient. It’s called Shockwave and Plasma
Accelerated Rock Cracking (SPARC).
Leading the SPARC project is Dr. David Staack, associate professor, Sallie and Don Davis ’61
Career Development Professor, and College of Engineering director of laboratory instruction re-
spectively. His team includes Dr. Dion Antao, assistant professor; Dr. Alan Palazzolo; James J. Cain,
Professor I; and Dr. Bruce Tai, assistant professor.
“The drilling technology that we are working on has the potential to increase drilling rates (rate
of penetration) and reduce the wear and tear of traditional drill bits. This is achieved by locally pre-
stressing or precracking the rock being drilled prior to the cutting action of the drill bit,” said Antao.
The team’s SPARC technology places high-voltage electrodes to the tip of traditional drill bits.
These electrodes emit a microscopic plasma discharge to shock the rock and crack it. By creating
these small fractures and weakening the rock, the drill head, using conventional diamond cutters,
is able to break through the material easier, increasing the rate of penetration (ROP).
Along with setting the stage for further development of geothermal energy, using electric plasma
bursts to increase the ROP will also streamline the drilling process, making it more cost effective.
“It’s very exciting to be able to apply my expertise in machining research to study rock drilling
with a real-world application,” said Tai. “This is truly a novel, interdisciplinary idea that will be a game changer.”
A game changer U.S. Secretary of Energy Rick Perry summed up in his related press release by saying, “Geothermal energy
is a clean and efficient baseload energy resource, making it an important part of our nation’s diverse energy portfolio. Developing
new, efficient drilling technologies will reduce these costs and increase the availability of this domestic renewable energy resource.
Dr. David Staack.
G
E
O
Simulator Use Improves Results in North America
Adapted from Information by Immersive Technologies
As one of the world’s largest suppliers of advanced equipment simulators, Immersive Technologies has seen consistent
growth in North America since deploying its first-generation units in the early 2000s.
Those who used the early models of simulators are upgrading
to the latest models, while new customers are discovering the value
of simulator training at an accelerated rate. North American cus-
tomers are achieving great results in targeted areas such as lower
spot times, higher dig rates, and reduced machine abuse.
Longtime customer Rio Tinto Kennecott, in Utah, is now using
Managed Services and a transportable PRO4 to train operators on
wet weather conditions. The majority of the company’s haul truck op-
erators have less than two years experience. With the mild winter of
2017/2018, many of them have not dealt with the challenges of op-
erating in heavy snow. Kennecott is running all operators through
simulator-based training to build confidence in driving in those con-
ditions. While the operators are being trained, data will be generated
to help identify other opportunities for targeted training to improve
safety, productivity, and unscheduled maintenance. New-hire training
is also part of Kennecott’s program and will continue to be a focus
into 2019.
In Wyoming, at Peabody’s North Antelope Rochelle Mine (NARM), a recently concluded Managed Services project pro-
duced some impressive results. Over the five-month course, NARM achieved a 2.4-second spot time reduction and a 57%
improvement in Operator Induced Machine Events (Alarms). “NARM continues to be one of the top achievers in operator
improvement. Their commitment to the safety and improvement of their staff is apparent by the results they achieve,said
Anthony Bruce, Immersive Technologies regional vice president - North America.
In Mexico, an underground hard rock customer described how the Embedded Trainer helped them achieve a:
;
96% reduction on rear brake heating events
;
86% reduction on front brake pressure drop events
;
79% reduction on transmission abuse events
;
4.5% reduction on fuel consumption, representing $444,181 in annual savings
“The fusion of Managed Services and simulator technology is a powerful combination as North American customers have
quickly realized following their implementations over the last decade. The fully supported solution by Immersive Technologies
Managed Services architecture drives
quantifiable return on investment. It in-
cludes proactive supervision to drive best
actions and access to select intellectual
property for training and continuous
Improvement,” Bruce stated.
Immersive Technologies works with
original equipment manufacturers includ-
ing Caterpillar, Komatsu, and Liebherr
to create realistic, accurate simultators
that replicate how the equipment oper-
ates. Hundreds of mining companies, in
44 countries around the world, use
these simulators to enhance the safety
and productivity of their operations.
21
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MIN
October Issue Deadlines!
Space Reservation:
August 25
th
Display & Classified
Ad Copy:
September 1
st
Open the Doorway to all
the Event Photos during
Alberta Water Well Drilling
Association 2019.
To see all the photos from this event, go
to www.worldwidedrillingresource.com
Feel free to download at will and print the photo(s) of your choice.
Compliments of
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
.
Photos are copyrighted and released for personal use only
- no commercial use permitted.
Congratulations to Sheena (L)
for being elected as the new
Executive Secretary for AWWDA!
22
AUGUST 2019
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What Happened in
Pittsburg County, Oklahoma?
Adapted from Information by the
U
.S. Chemical Safety Board
It was January 22, 2018, when an oil rig in Oklahoma
suffered a deadly blowout, killing five workers. The U.S.
Chemical Safety Board (CSB) has been investigating
t
he incident to try to identify what caused the accident and,
more importantly, what can be done to prevent something
like this from happening again. In addition to spotting gaps
in the regulations governing onshore drilling safety, the
report discovered inadequacies in safety management
systems and industry standards. CSB Interim Executive
Dr. Kristen Kulinowski said, “Our investigation found
significant lapses in good safety practices at this site.
For over 14 hours, there was a dangerous condition build-
ing at this well. The lack of effective safety manage-
ment at this well resulted in a needless catastrophe.”
According to the report, the ultimate cause of the
blowout and rig fire was the failure of two preventive
barriers. The primary barrier was the hydrostatic pressure in the well, produced by drilling mud;
the secondary barrier was human detection of gas flowing into or expanding in the well and acti-
vation of the rig’s blowout preventer. The report explains how unplanned underbalanced drilling
and tripping operations allowed a large quantity of gas to enter the well, while critical flow checks,
used to determine if gas is in the well, were not performed.
The investigation identified several factors leading to the failure of both barriers including a lack
of planning, training, equipment, skills, and procedures. Surprisingly, there are no regulations specifically
for onshore gas and oil drilling. Gas and oil well drilling is exempt from Occupational Safety and Health
Administration’s (OSHA’s) Process Safety Management standard which covers
safety for chemical processing facilities. OSHA has been utilizing the general duty
clause, which “protects workers from serious and recognized workplace hazards,”
but fails to address the unique safety hazards associated with gas and oil drilling.
The report also revealed how inadequate and ineffective the alarm system
was. It would have sounded constantly with noncritical alarms 14 hours prior to the
blowout. Having so many noncritical alarms is most likely the reason both the day
and night drill operators chose to turn off the entire system. Without the critical
alarms, the workers were unaware of the flammable gas entering the well.
Investigator Lauren Grim said, “An effective alarm system is a method to help
workers become aware of hazardous conditions, like gas entering the well. With
the alarm system off, the safety of the operation solely relied on workers to either
visually identify signs of the gas influx or calculate volume differences that could
indicate gas influx, and in this case, neither method was effective, and workers
were unaware of the very large gas influx into the well before the incident. As a
result, the workers had little knowledge of the impending disaster.”
At the time of the blowout, three workers were in the driller’s cabin. Two other work-
ers who were on the rig floor ran into the driller’s cabin during the blowout and fire. There
was no way for the men to escape and they suffered thermal burn injuries, as well as
smoke / soot inhalation.When the blowout mud and gas ignited, it created a massive
fire on the rig floor. All five of the workers inside the driller’s cabin were effectively trapped
because fire blocked the driller’s cabins two exit doors. Our investigation found that
there is no guidance to ensure that an emergency evacuation option is present onboard
these rigs or can protect workers in the driller’s cabin from fire hazards,” stated Grim.
The CSB is calling on the American Petroleum Institute (API) to address design
improvements to protect driller’s cabin occupants from blowout and fire hazards. The
report recommended API create guidance on Alarm Management for the drilling industry,
to help ensure alarm systems are effective in alerting drilling crews to unsafe conditions.
As onshore gas and oil production increases across the country, it is important
the industry uses proven and reliable safety standards and practices. If some of
these safety practices had been in place, this tragedy could have been averted.
The most viable exit door for those
in the driller’s cabin was hinged so
when the door was opened, it blocked
the escape path.
Atlantis Vault
Atlantis Vault
• Self-Contained
• Self-Contained
• Simple installation
• Simple installation
• Trouble-free operation
• Trouble-free operation
For more information call:
(270) 786-3010
or visit us online:
www.geothermalsupply.com
23
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LOOK
Surprise, surprise, surprise
H
eisey Machine is on Facebook!
www.facebook.com/floatingsubs/
Check it out - follow and like it.
Ask about their new 2470SX lathe.
They hope you had a great time
at JUBILEE!
G&
O
www.starironworks.com
257 Caroline Street
Punxsutawney, PA 15767
800-927-0560 814-427-2555
Fax: 814-427-5164
SERVING THE WATER WELL INDUSTRY
Serving the Drilling Industry
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Industry Announcements
Eijkelkamp North America has been selected as a new dealer
for Fraste rigs in the Eastern United States. Based in North Carolina, the
Eijkelkamp Team is excited to offer the Fraste conventional rig series, as
well as after-sales service, spares, and even rental rigs.
Mimir Invest AB has acquired Epiroc AB’s geotechnical consumables product line.
With manufacturing sites in Scotland, Finland, and the United States, the geotechnical drilling
c
onsumables product line is a global market leader providing primarily down-the-hole hammers
and related drill bits, as well as casing advancement systems for the infrastructure, construction,
gas and oil, and scientific industries.
“We have found a better home for this business, which we have defined as a non-strategic core area for us,” said Helena
Hedblom, senior executive vice president mining and infrastructure for Epiroc AB. “We believe it will have a good future with
the new owner, Mimir.”
Managing Partner for Mimir, Eric Bork said, ”We are happy partnering with the employees and customers of the business,
combining Mimir’s industrial and investing expertise with the high-quality staff, expertise, and know-how of the geotechnical
consumables business. This combination provides a great foundation for forming a new, growing business.”
Komatsu Ltd. has agreed to purchase global mining technology and workforce optimization firm Immersive Corporation
Pty. Ltd. through its wholly-owned subsidiary in Australia,
Retaining its headquarters in Perth, Western Australia, Immersive Technologies will op-
erate as an independently managed, wholly-owned subsidiary of Komatsu. The company
will continue to operate under its existing name and branding, while continuing to collab-
orate with all equipment manufacturers to address performance improvement challenges of mixed equipment fleets.
We have been particularly impressed by Komatsu’s bold vision for the future of mining and their proactive steps to pursue it.
We are very pleased that Komatsu sees Immersive Technologies as having an important role in this future. Further, we see
Komatsu’s high level of customer focus, which supports collaboration between competing mining suppliers, to benefit mining
customers, as being highly aligned to Immersive Technologies’ business,” said Wayde Salfinger, executive director and cofounder.
A Consultants Perspective
b
y Edward E. Everett, CPG
Strata Environmental Services, Inc.
Water Level Data Recorders - A Blessing or a Curse?
My hydrogeologic education and early experience in the field involved manually collecting aquifer
test data, then taking the data, plotting it by hand on logarithmic graph paper, then doing manual curve
matching to determine aquifer characteristics. Some equations just required entering various data into
the formula and calculating the results (with the use of those new-fangled calculators). If a calculation resulted in a transmis-
sivity value of 43,576.2 gallons per day per foot (GPD/ft), we rounded up the number to 44,000 GPD/ft, or if we wanted to be
precise, we rounded the number to 43,600 GPD/ft.
I understand the concept of GPD/ft, but now we use feet squared per day, which I cannot wrap my brain around.
Importantly, we understood we were characterizing an aquifer of many acres, or even square miles from data collected from
a couple of wells representing a miniscule percentage of the aquifer area. Consequently, it was our opinion that rounding of
our calculated numbers was probably as accurate as we needed to be, given the amount of information we had on the aquifer.
Now we collect aquifer test data with data loggers which can be programmed to collect water levels at just about any
designated time interval. In a recent test, I set the loggers to record on a logarithmic scale, with a maximum time interval of
15 minutes. During the initial start of the test, the data loggers recorded 63 readings in the first minute, with the number of
readings decreasing until the 15-minute increment was reached after 2.5 hours. Where I work, our regulatory agencies want
the early time data because it is “so important”. So what do roughly 100 readings in the first three minutes of the test tell us?
(We used to have to hustle to get three readings in this same time period.)
Pump discharge is based on total dynamic head, so when water levels in a well are high (at the start of a test), the pump
will produce a higher volume of water. Most of the time, the drop pipe and discharge pipe are empty when the test starts, fur-
ther reducing total dynamic head. This is especially true when testing a well hooked to an irrigation system, which may have
hundreds of feet of piping before the water reaches the irrigation heads. Eventually, the system reaches an equilibrium pres-
sure, the water level in the well reaches relatively stability, and the pumping rate remains constant. At that time, we meet the
requirements of a constant-rate aquifer test.
So what does all the early time data tell us? In my opinion, it tells us more
about the system configuration and pump design than it actually tells us about the
aquifer response to pumping. This information occurs after system pressure stabi-
www.starironworks.com
257 Caroline Street
Punxsutawney, PA 15767
800-927-0560 814-427-2555
Fax: 814-427-5164
SERVING THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY
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Everett cont’d on page 44.
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by Tim Rasmussen
The bridge looked old. There were some broken deck boards here and there. Seth
Weilage decided to take a closer look, so he pulled off to the side and climbed down out of the drill rig. He made his way down
t
he bank where he could get a better look at the condition of the bridge from the underside. He did not like what he saw. The
bridge had been built on large logs. It sagged a bit in the middle. There were no supporting timbers under it, except for one
which jutted at an angle out of the river to support one of the old logs.
As he stood there, a small truck came by and passed slowly over the structure. The bridge sagged a little under its weight.
Seth wondered what would happen if the full weight of the 10,000 or so pounds of rig was on it. He looked down at the water
below. It did not seem deep, and the stream was only about 30 feet wide. If the bridge broke and the rig went into the river, it
would never come out, or at least not come out in one piece and that not without a huge effort. In any event, the rig would
be ruined.
Seth came back up the bank just as Jon Hansen pulled up. He had been following Seth, driving one of our small 4x4
double cab trucks in which they had planned to come back. The village they were heading for was another 45 minutes farther
down the rough road that wound through the hills and valleys of Guatemala. They were on a mission to bring clean water to a
remote village which had none. Jon had been to the village before and had immediately been struck by the poverty of the
people there. He had been to poor villages, but this was one of the worst he had seen. It was
just a few shacks near the road and paths leading from the road into the heavy jungle vege-
tation. There were no public buildings or anything that looked like a school. There was only a
polluted stream for a water source. The people there were desperate for water.
Jon and Seth talked it over and decided they should not trust the bridge. It was not worth
risking the rig. Just upstream there was a place that looked like it had been a ford across the
river years ago, probably before the bridge was built. It looked like he could get down to the
creek okay, and there was a road up out of the river on the other side. Seth and Jon decided
they could probably cross there, hoping there were no huge rocks or holes in the streambed.
Easing down off the road, the rig swayed back and forth dangerously as Seth approached
the water. He could see the water was only a foot or so deep and the bottom was covered in
small rocks. There was no mud. As he got to the water, he decided not to stop and just kept
going with as much speed as he dared and as seemed safe.
Plowing through the creek, he came to the other side and started out of the water. For a
moment, the drive wheels seemed to slip and then caught, and he was up and out of the
creek. Then he was back on the road. “Thank you Lord,” he said out loud, but he did not stop
to marvel at what he had done. He just shifted into second and started back down the road toward the village. Toward the
people who needed the water. Toward the children the clean water would save. Yes, thank you Lord, for men like Seth and
Jon, who give of their time and talents to serve others.
If you have a heart for other people,
and the skills to run a drill, please come
and help.
Contact Gary Bartholomew at
509-466-5075 or 509-939-1941
Tim
Tim Rasmussen may be contacted
via e-mail to michele@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
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October Issue Deadlines!
Space Reservation:
August 25
th
Display & Classified
Ad Copy:
September 1
st
In Memoriam
George John Geisser III (1949~2019)
George John Geisser III of Attleboro, Massachusetts, and Savannah, Georgia, passed away May 26, 2019.
Born in Providence, Rhode Island, in 1949, George received his bachelor of science degree in civil engineering
from the University of Rhode Island in 1973. He was the proud owner, operator, and president of Geisser
Engineering Corporation, Allstate Drilling, and New England Foundation in East Providence.
Living a full life, George loved to travel, golf, boat, and spend time at his second home in Savannah. He especially treasured
time spent with his grandchildren.
He was a member of the Rhode Island Society of Professional Engineers, National Society of Professional Engineers,
American Society of Civil Engineers, East Providence/Seekonk Rotary, Elks Club, Society of St. Vincent de Paul, Wannamoisett
Country Club, East Greenwich Yacht Club, and Ledgewood Condominium Association - serving as president for many of them
during his lifetime. George had been named Young Engineer of the Year in 1984 and Rotarian of the Year in 1996-1997.
George leaves behind his wife of 46 years, Linda; children Kelly (Sean) and Gregory (Sarah); grandchildren Alexander,
Mackenzie, Lily, Molly, and Samuel; his father George Jr.; siblings, and other family.
David Eugene Barlow (1953~2019)
David Eugene Barlow of Gillette, Wyoming, passed away June 9, 2019. Born in Des Moines, Idaho, in
1953, David enlisted in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam Era, where he served as a radio operator. Moving on
to civilian life, he was a disc jockey in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, before moving to Dallas, Texas, where he began
his career in the manufacturing/mining industry. He was employed at Ingersoll-Rand for 30 years, then with
Cate Equipment/Atlas Copco/Epiroc for 17 years, retiring as parts manager at Epiroc in Gillette earlier this year.
Preferring small town life, David was an outdoorsman who enjoyed camping, hunting, fishing, pets, and
critters. He was always ready to host by fixing an awesome brisket or some reward from a hunt. Family was
very important to him throughout his life. He loved to visit, be visited, or get updated on the phone.
David is survived by his wife Lori; children Michelle (Marc), David, Shawn, and Daniel (Kelsie); and granddaughter Ava.
The management and staff of
WWDR
WWDR extend their sympathies to George’s and David’s family and friends.
Lest we forget...
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AUGUST 2019
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®
Get Over It
by Tim Connor
I love T-shirts
and sweatshirts with
clever and some-
times provocative
sayings on them.
The souvenir shop
is always my first stop when travelling,
and trust me, I've found some really neat
ones. Recently, I took a day trip to one of
my favorite small North Carolina towns
and found one that simply said: "Get
Over It", so naturally I bought it.
So . . . what do you need to get over?
1
You didn’t have an ideal childhood.
1
You are not as attractive or hand-
some as you think you should be.
1
You were not educated at the
best schools.
1
Your parents didn’t love or support
you as much as they did another off-
spring.
1
You were treated unfairly in your
last career position.
1
Som eon e you car e abou t is
ignoring you.
1
Your best client isnt returning
your phone calls or e-mails.
1
Your boss treats you like a bottom feeder.
1
How about - It's your turn _______________________!!!
Live wisely this year,
Tim
To receive Tim’s weekly FREE motivational booster articles, contact him at www.timconnor.com with
“please add me to your free booster e-mail subscriber list” in the subject line. Or contact him via e-mail to
michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
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AUGUST 2019
First Multilateral Well Drilled in India
Adapted from Information by Essar Global Fund
The first ever multilateral wells in India were recently drilled by OGD Services Limited, Essar Global Fund’s investment
in drilling services. A multilateral well has two or more laterals (horizontal, vertical, or deviated) drilled through a window cut
from a main mother well. By using this method, one well can produce from several reservoirs at once.
Multilateral wells combine the advantages of horizontal drilling
techniques with the ability to achieve multiple target zones. While
the concept of multilateral drilling has been around for some time,
challenges have made it difficult to implement in coal bed methane
(CBM) projects.
OGD was excited by the prospect of drilling India’s first multilat-
eral wells for the client at the CBM fields at Shahdol, Madhya Pradesh,
India. Detailed discussions were undertaken with the client to ana-
lyze and adjust the well plans, and align them with the company’s rig
capabilities.
At first, it was thought a much higher capacity rig would be
required for horizontal drilling during the project. However, the
team’s creative and proactive engagement with the client ensured deployment of OGD’s existing 750-horsepower rig, leading
to successful drilling of one well. Knowledge acquired while drilling the first well has been used to enhance the company’s
performance as they drill subsequent wells.
D
IR
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Winds of Change
b
y Bonnie Love, Editor, 
WorldWide Drilling Resource
W
orldWide Drilling Resource
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®
I couldn’t wait to attend the 2019 Women In Mining (WIM) National
Annual Meeting in Golden, Colorado, earlier this year. It was unlike any
other.
The event was filled with professional development and network-
ing opportunities. The speakers were inspirational and empowering
with their messages of diversity and inclusion. Not just diversity in gen-
der and nationality, but also diversified thinking and how to embrace
those who think differently than yourself. It was eye-opening.
Attendees could chose between two different mine tours, or a
leadership development workshop. I elected to tour the Newmont
Goldcorp Cripple Creek & Victor mine and was thrilled to share the expe-
rience with my daughter, Bethany. It was very interesting to learn
how we are still mining the same locations that were originally
mined in the late 1800s. There are actually four surface operations
on the site. Brittany, a geologist with Newmont Goldcorp explained
how gold telluride ores are only found in four
places around the world, including Cripple Creek.
She also gave us a great tip on how to tell real
gold from fool’s gold (pyrite).
Of course, no trip to Golden, would be com-
plete without a trip to the Colorado School of Mines
(CSM) Geology Museum; it was stunning!
WIM celebrated the creation of three new chapters, Arizona,
CSM, and the University of West Virginia. Also, the new website
is up and running. WIM National has made significant strides in
meeting the changing needs of its members, supporting each
other in the workplace, and embracing the winds of change.
To view all the photos from the event, visit worldwidedrillingresource.com
The Miss Colorado crown, on
display at the CSM Geology
M
useum, contains over 600
stones.
MIN
WWDR
WWDR photos.
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Environmental Monitoring
by Thomas Kwader, Ph.D., P.G.
How Many Wells Does it Take to Define the Hydrogeology of a Site?
Although I have worked the majority of my 45-year career in hydrogeology in North Florida, I have
also worked in various other areas of the United States and have observed a wide range of hydrogeologic
conditions. I worked in areas where the geology was very consistent laterally for miles and water levels
well beyond 100 feet in depth. I have also worked in water basins with first-magnitude springs flowing
more than 100 cubic feet of water per second (750 gallons per second) or flowing more than approximately 45,000 gallons per
minute.
Many of my projects required a good working understanding of the site’s subsurface geology and hydrology for remediating
a contaminated site, or for providing a reliable supply of potable groundwater. Sites varied tremendously in complexity, with
some sites varying very little from one end to the other, while some sites that were relatively level in elevation varied greatly in
both geology and hydrology from borehole to borehole. Even over very short distances, some sites showed significant strati-
graphic variability less than ten feet between boreholes.
Oftentimes, to develop a good understanding of how contaminated groundwater moves vertically and laterally at a particular
site, collections of soil, sediments, and water samples are taken and analyzed for various physical and chemical characteristics.
Drilling contractors often use various methods to collect “cores” of the subsurface soils to obtain information regarding the
speed and direction of water moving below the site surface. The location, number, and depths of boreholes drilled depend
upon the complexity of the hydrogeology beneath the site and how the hydrogeology varies across the site. The number of
borings is also dependent upon how large the site is. Generally, at least three borings are necessary, and some sites may re-
quire more than 100 borings because of
the complex layering and source(s) of
contamination.
One of my “worst-case” sites is locat-
ed in west central Florida and required
more than 50 roto-sonic continuous
cores with no two borings being alike.
Ironically, the first three borings on the
corners were similar on the 60-acre site;
however, the more borings we collected,
the more complex the site became. That
site taught me a lesson in humility and
reinforced the fact that hydrogeology
(especially karst) can be extremely
complex.
Tom
Tom Kwader may be contacted
via e-mail to michele@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
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32
AUGUST 2019
Torquato Drilling Accessories provides a full range of roller cone rotary hole openers custom
manufactured using the finest materials. Large, premium-
quality roller cones are made in many thread connections
and sizes up to 60 inches to meet job requirements and
ensure dependable performance in a wide range of forma-
tions. Available with tungsten carbide inserts or steel tooth,
Torquato’s rotary hole openers are well-suited for vertical
applications such as water well, geothermal, or gas and oil,
and are also ideal for horizontal directional drilling.
Torquato Drilling Accessories is a Valued
WWDR
WWDR Advertiser.
Partial Failure = Total Failure
b
y Britt Storkson
Owner, P2FlowLLC
I was speaking with a farmer the other day, and he was telling me about an automated crop sprayer
for which he had purchased a software upgrade. He said it fixed problems in one area, but introduced
problems and inaccuracies on other areas. In other words, it worked, but it didn’t work well.
I’ve observed this phenomenon over and over again in industry where a software product would perform
correctly most of the time, but would malfunction some of the time. The time the software malfunctioned
could be just a few seconds, but when human lives depend on the decisions a computer makes - such as flying an aircraft -
those few seconds can mean the difference between an uneventful flight and a multiple fatality incident.
This is how we get cars that accelerate out of control for no apparent reason, or transmissions which refuse to upshift
(like my father-in-law’s minivan does from time to time). If we are dealing with a cooling pump that stays on too long with the
only harm done is wasted energy, it can be tolerated. When human lives depend on the computer software, this software
must work the first time - every time. Any failure - even for a few seconds - cannot be tolerated.
Often, the people who are tasked with making this software work - the operators - have to “cover” for its flaws. They must
remember to avoid certain entries or not do certain things to cause the computer to malfunction, or reset it when it does. While
most operators (including airplane pilots) are very competent, but taking into account the complex, changing nature of the
typical modern computer system, no one can remember everything. This begs the question: Why does the operator have to
“cover” for the computer system in the first place?
How did we get here? Two things: 1. Computer overcomplexity, driven primarily by computer vendors who “pile on” fea-
tures and functions (complexity) solely to add cost . . . not to make the computer any better or more reliable. 2. Inadequate
testing which is made far more difficult by overcomplexity.
Companies often do not give product testing the attention (and budget) it deserves because there is no immediate return
for the money invested. The company financial analysts cannot quantify what testing should cost and when it will end. It’s be-
cause there is no predefined “endgame” for proper testing. Testing is complete when the product works the first time, and
every time, under every condition it can be expected to encounter during its lifetime.
While many have tried to find a lower cost alternative to product testing, there is none. One must simply live with it over
time. If it has a problem, sooner or later the problem will manifest itself. When identified, the problem should be fixed immedi-
ately, then retested. There is no other way.
Britt Britt Storkson may be contacted via e-mail to michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
33
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AUGUST 2019
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Flomatic
®
~ Celebrating Their Expansion
b
y Ed Moranski, Chief Marketing Officer
W
orldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
®
I was happy to be one of the 150 guests
at the Flomatic
®
facility expansion event on
June 21, 2019.
Bo Andersson, president of Flomatic, was the master of ceremonies. He
introduced several honoree guests, including Mayor Dan Hall of Glens Falls,
and Kenneth Scherer, a representative from New York Senator Little’s office.
Another speaker was Empire State Development Capital Region Director Mike
Yevoli, one of the key individuals who helped Flomatic obtain the grant which
made the expansion possible. Bo provided some specific insight to the history
of the company and the new testing, training, marketing, and storage facility.
He also stressed that as exciting as the expansion is, it is the employees who are the most important asset of Flomatic.
The company was founded as White Flomatic Corporation in 1933, in Hoosick Falls, New York, by Forrest S. White. Bo
assumed the leadership role in 1979, and the current location in Glens Falls, New York, was opened in 1997.
The expansion consists of a larger warehouse storage area, interactive marketing room, hands-on testing facility, as well
as a training conference room overlooking the testing lab area. It is truly a state-of-the-art facility.
The addition is 24,000 square feet, and houses an
11,000-gallon water testing tank. A custom area was
created to refinish the valves, consisting of three dif-
ferent machines to complete the process from begin-
ning to end. The space can accommodate valves from
¼-inch to 36 inches, and as heavy as 1500 pounds.
Engineering Manager Brian Allen explained and demon-
strated the testing and pool area to the group.
It was an educational and fun event.
To see all the photos from Flomatic 2019,
go to www.worldwidedrillingresource.com
W
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The World’s First Electric Autonomous Blasthole Drill
Adapted from Information by Boliden AB
T
he world’s most efficient open-pit copper mine Aitik, owned by Boliden AB in northern Sweden, has been operating the
world’s first electric autonomous blasthole drill in a test to see if the rest of the fleet should be upgraded. The mine currently
uses electric manually operated drill rigs, but the results of this test may change things.
Aitik Mine Manager Erik Jänkänpää introduced the idea of testing electric autonomous blasthole drilling, and a trial run
was conducted. The test is being done in a three-year staged approach which began in April 2017. The first part involved tele-
remote drilling with the results leading to stage 2, a trial of single line autonomous drilling. The third stage will evaluate the
extent to which a whole pattern can be drilled with an electric autonomous drill.
The drill, an Epiroc Pit Viper 351, is running successfully and achieving
a 30% increase in productivity, compared to the manned equipment. In ad-
dition to the success of the project, operators had a lot of positive feedback.
Further testing will be done with the LTE network the mine is commissioning.
The key performance indicators (KPIs) will be reviewed before the
company decides whether to upgrade the remaining fleet, which could start
as early as October.
Shane Leighton, senior engineer technology/mine automation, explained
how the trial represents a world first in using an autonomous electric Pit
Viper drill. Other mining operations use the automated Pit Vipers which run
on diesel. “There are quite a few mines in the world running diesel-powered
automated drills; this is the first automated electric 351 Pit Viper. What we
have learned from the trial in Aitik will support an upgrade to the . . . fleet
in Kevitsa [another mine the company has in Finland] to an automated fleet that is scheduled to start in 2020,” he stated.
The trial must achieve a number of KPIs covering safety, production, and arctic weather conditions before the company
can decide to invest completely. “Since we have never used this type of technology before, we wanted to be 100% certain that
we could be successful before deciding to upgrade our entire fleet of Pit Vipers. The trial addresses that,” explained Shane.
Overview cameras mounted at various locations around the pit, along with four cameras on the drill itself, gives the operator
a broad view of what is happening around the drill. It also uses a laser-based system to detect objects and a proximity detection
solution to detect personnel; these require staff to wear a tag which will vibrate if they enter the drill pattern.
E
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B
Blasting
by: RAM, Inc.
Surface Blasting Course
September 4-6 ~ Rapid City, SD
phone: 740-363-6976
www.ramets.com
by: Academy of Blasting and
Explosive Technology
Rock Blasting & Overbreak Control
September 24-26 ~ Montville, OH
phone: 440-474-6700
www.academyblasting.com
Construction
by: Associated General Contractors
Safety Management Training Course
September 4-6 ~ Boise, ID
phone: 703-837-5409
www.agc.org
Drilling Fluids
by: Wyo-Ben, Inc.
Mud School
September 9-13 ~ Billings, MT
phone: 406-652-6351
www.wyoben.com
by: Aries Industries, Inc.
Municipal Sewer Grout School
September 11-12 ~ Lithia Springs, GA
phone: 770-941-1144
www.ariesindustries.com
Education
Education
Connection
Connection
Engine / Machinery Maintenance
by: Sullivan-Palatek, Inc.
Portable Diesel Air Compressor
T
echnician Training
Sept. 30-Oct. 3 ~ Michigan City, IN
phone: 219-874-2497
www.sullivan-palatek.com
Foundations
by: Pile Driving Contractors Assn and
Pile Dynamics, Inc.
S
eminar on Deep Foundation
Integrity Testing and
Wave Equation Analysis
September 11 ~ Cleveland, OH
High Strain Dynamic Foundation
Testing Wkshp & Proficiency Test
September 12-13 ~ Cleveland, OH
phone: 904-215-4771
www.piledrivers.org
by: Deep Foundations Institute
Europe Secretariat
Pile Integrity Testing Seminar
September 12 ~ Brussels, BELGIUM
phone: +32-2-655-77-11
www.dfi-europe.org
Groundwater / Water Well
by: National Ground Water Assn
Conference on Fractured Rock
and Groundwater
September 23-24 ~ Burlington, VT
phone: 614-898-7791 www.ngwa.org
by: Princeton Groundwater, Inc.
Pollution & Hydrology Course
September 23-27 ~ Las Vegas, NV
phone: 813-964-0800
www.princeton-groundwater.com
Mining
by: Deep Foundations Institute
Shotcrete Short Course
September 9-11 ~ Idaho Springs, CO
phone: 973-423-4030
www.dfi.org
Pipe
by: North American Society for
Trenchless Technology
Pipe Bursting
September 18 ~ ONLINE WEBINAR
phone: 216-570-8711
www.nastt.org
Pumps
by: Franklin Electric
Residential Basic
September 17-18 ~ Wilburton, OK
phone: 800-348-2420
www.franklinwater.com/more/
training/franklintech-schedule/
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AUGUST 2019
Congratulations to:
Congratulations to:
Ed Ilsley
Ed Ilsley
Thetford Ctr, VT
Thetford Ctr, VT
Winner for July!
Winner for July!
Time for a Little Fun!
July Puzzle Solution:
Seametrics
Moab Bit and Tool Company, Inc.
Win a prize! Send your
completed puzzle to:
WWDR
WWDR PO Box 660
Bonifay, FL 32425
or fax to: 850-547-0329
Can you identify which ads in this
issue these two photos came from?
302-684-3197
FAX: 302-384-0643
142 Broadkill Rd. Milton, DE 19968
www.atlantic-screen.com
email: atlantic@ce.net
Manufacturers of Slotted &
Perforated Pipe ranging
from ½” to 24” diameter
Atlantic
Screen &
Mfg., Inc.
Well Rehab. Products
Manholes
Bentonite
Filter Sock
Inline Chemical Mixers
Sampling Bailers
Clear PVC Pipe
Locking Caps
The north pole of
Uranus is dark for 42
years at a time.
The “Idiots” Corner
b
y “Billy Bob Smith”
Do you think the world is as crazy or worse than we are? If you think there are a lot of idiotic rules,
l
aws, and behaviors in the U.S., here are just a few of the things over the years which have been banned
o
r done in other countries that make us look like the smartest people in the world. Seriously, having visited
a few countries during my travels, I won’t share the hundreds of things I have witnessed in many coun-
tries, but here are some you might find interestingly stupid . . .
Burundi: No Jogging - During a period of ethnic strife in the country that only ended within the last decade,
citizens would go jogging together in large groups as a way to get out their energy and use one another as protection from
dangerous militias. However, in March 2014, the country's president banned these jogs, claiming they are used as cover for
people to plan subversive activities and, in fact, many opposition members have been jailed for taking part in group jogs.
T
urkmenistan: No Lip-Synching - Well, at least at large cultural events and on television programming. In 2005, then-President
S
aparmurat Niyazov banned lip-synching to preserve "true culture." He had also banned opera and ballet, deeming them "unnecessary."
China: No Reincarnation without Government Permission - A 2007 law in China on the "Management Measures for the
Reincarnation of Living Buddhas in Tibetan Buddhism" made it illegal for Buddhist monks to reincarnate without prior gov-
ernment approval.
Romania: No Scrabble - In the 1980s, Romanian leader Nicolae Ceausescu banned the game of Scrabble because it was
"subversive" and "evil."
Singapore: No Importing or Sale of Gum - This makes it essentially impossible for locals to get any.
India: No Advertising Alcohol - The late 1990s saw the Indian government ban advertisements for alcoholic beverages.
Germany: No Running Out of Gas on the Autobahn - If you do run out of gas, don't think about heading off on foot to find a
gas station - walking on the Autobahn is also prohibited.
Philippines: No singing “My Way” by Sinatra - This is technically a de facto ban and not actually legislated, but many karaoke
bars have banned the song, and many patrons would refuse to sing it even if they did carry it. Why? The song has led to at
least six murders, stemming from arguments over, some believe, the "arrogant" tone of the tune. The phenomenon has even
been dubbed the "My Way Killings."
How about one more before I can’t laugh any more . . . there is a ban on "noisy footwear" in Capri, Italy. So flip-flops and
squeaky shoes are not allowed.
If you have ever been outside the U.S., I’ll wager you have seen some really stupid stuff too - feel free to share with us.
Hope you are having a "stupid-free" summer . . .
Billy Bob Contact him via e-mail to michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
38
AUGUST 2019
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WorldWide Drilling Resource
®
is proud to be a member of these associations.
Alberta Water Well Drilling Association
Tel: 7 8 0 - 3 86- 2 3 3 5
awwda@xplornet.com
A
rizona Water Well Association
admin@azwwa.org
www.azwwa.org
Black Hills Chapter of the ISEE
President: Doug Hoy
www.bitwconference.org
British Columbia Ground Water Assn.
Tel: 6 0 4 - 5 30- 8 9 3 4
secretary@bcgwa.org www.bcgwa.org
California Groundwater Association
Tel: 9 1 6 - 2 31- 2 1 3 4 Fax: 6 1 4 - 8 98 - 7 7 9 1
www.groundh2o.org
Concrete Sawing & Drilling Association
Tel: 7 2 7 - 5 77- 5 0 0 4
matthew@csda.org
www.csda.org
Empire State Water Well Drillers Assn.
Tel: 3 1 5 - 3 39- 8 9 6 0 Fax: 3 1 5 - 3 39 - 8 9 6 0
sue@nywelldriller.org
www.nywelldriller.org
Florida Ground Water Association
850-205-5641 Fax: 850-222-3019
djessup@executiveoffice.org
www.fgwa.org
Indiana Ground Water Assn.
Tel: 8 8 8 - 4 43- 7 3 3 0 Fax: 7 6 5 - 2 31 - 4 4 3 0
ingroundwater@gmail.com
www.indianagroundwater.org
Iowa Geothermal Association
Tel: 5 1 5 - 2 24- 6 4 6 9
info@iowageothermal.org
www.iowageothermal.org
Kentucky Groundwater Association
Tel: 6 0 6 - 5 23- 1 2 1 5 Fax : 8 6 6 - 896- 0 1 8 4
www.kygwa.org
Louisiana Ground Water Association
Tel: 2 2 5 - 7 44- 4 5 5 4
www.lgwa.org
Michigan Ground Water Association
Tel: 8 5 5 - 2 25- 6 4 9 2 Fax : 6 1 4 - 898- 7 7 8 6
www.michigangroundwater.com
Minnesota Water Well Association
Tel: 8 0 0 - 3 32- 2 1 0 4
www.mwwa.org
Missouri Water Well Association
Tel: 3 1 4 - 9 74- 6 9 9 2
Mwwa.MoWaterWellAssociation@yahoo.com
Montana Water Well Drillers Association
Tel: 4 0 6 - 6 86- 3 1 6 8
www.mwwda.org
National Drilling Association
Tel: 8 7 7 - 6 32- 4 7 4 8
Fax: 216-803-9900
www.nda4u.com
National Ground Water Association
Tel: 8 0 0 - 5 51- 7 3 7 9 Fax: 6 1 4 - 8 98 - 7 7 8 6
www.ngwa.org
Nebraska Well Driller Association
Tel: 4 0 2 - 4 76- 0 1 6 2
lee@h2oboy.net
www.nebraskawelldrillers.org
New Jersey Ground Water Association
barbemor@gmail.com www.njgwa.org
North Carolina Ground Water Assn.
Tel: 9 1 9 - 8 76- 0 6 8 7 ela i n e @ e x ecm a n . n e t
www.ncgwa.org
North Dakota Well Drillers Association
Tel: 7 0 1 - 5 67- 4 1 2 6
ndwda@outlook.com • www.ndwda.com
Northern Plains Chapter of the ISEE
President: Billy Obermire
Tel: 3 0 7 - 6 89- 0 0 5 0
www.bitwconference.org
Ohio Water Well Association, Inc.
Tel: 9 3 7 - 2 78- 0 3 0 8 Fax: 9 3 7 - 2 78 - 0 3 1 7
www.ohiowaterwell.org
Oklahoma Ground Water Association
Tel: 4 0 5 - 2 09- 6 4 8 2
josh@okgroundwater.org
www.okgroundwater.org
Ontario Groundwater Association
Tel: 5 1 9 - 2 45- 7 1 9 4 Fax: 5 1 9 - 2 45 - 7 1 9 6
executivedirector@ogwa.ca
www.ogwa.ca
Pennsylvania Ground Water Association
Tel: 8 1 4 - 5 53- 3 8 8 3
pgwaorg@gmail.com www.pgwa.org
Shallow Exploration Drillers Clinic
Tel: 4 0 2 - 4 72- 7 5 5 0
jloomis3@unl.edu http://sedc.unl.edu
S
outh Atlantic Well Drillers “JUBILEE”
Tel: 8 5 5 - 9 87- 7 4 6 9 Fax: 8 5 0 - 2 22- 3 0 1 9
kgordon@executiveoffice.org
www.jubileewatershow.com
South Carolina Ground Water Association
Tel: 8 0 3 - 3 56- 6 8 0 9 Fax: 8 0 3 - 3 56- 6 8 2 6
scgwa@sc.rr.com www.scgwa.org
South Dakota Well Drillers Association
Tel: 6 0 5 - 7 34- 6 6 3 1 www.sdw d a . o r g
Southwest Mississippi Community College
Well Construction Technology
Tel: 6 0 1 - 2 76- 3 7 3 8
cdunn@smcc.edu
Tenne s s e e Wat e r Wel l Ass o c i a t i on
Tel: 8 6 5 - 7 61- 4 3 6 3
tnwaterwellassociation@gmail.com
Texas Alli a n c e of E n e r g y Pro d u c e r s
Tel: 9 4 0 - 7 23- 4 1 3 1 Fax: 9 4 0 - 7 23- 4 1 3 2
joannb@texasalliance.org
www.texasalliance.org
Texas G r o u nd Wa t e r A s s o c iat i o n
Tel: 5 1 2 - 4 72- 7 4 3 7 Fax: 5 1 2 - 4 72- 0 5 3 7
drobbins@twca.org www.tgwa.org
Utah Ground Water Association
Tel: 8 0 1 - 5 41- 7 2 5 9
www.utahgroundwater.org
Vermont Ground Water Association
Ken White, President: 802-738-8400
kwhite.vaw@gmail.com
Margaret Laggis, Executive Secretary
laggistics@comcast.net
Virginia Water Well Association
Tel: 8 0 4 - 3 87- 8 3 9 5 Fax: 8 0 4 - 3 02- 7 9 7 8
info@vawaterwellassociation.org
www.vawaterwellassociation.org
ed@worldwidedrillingresource.com
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AUGUST 2019
Geothermal Power Potential
in Nevada is Heating Up
Adapted from Information by University of Nevada, Reno
The Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology made two successful discoveries in the
Great Basin using a previously untried method for finding unknown, hidden geothermal
resources. Both systems are blind, meaning there are no surface indications of hot water.
No previous exploration had been undertaken in one of the areas, and the other area had
only seen minor exploration in the past. The play fairway method includes the study of
many geological and geophysical attributes of a region, including the location of earthquake faults.
“The exploration, the mapping, the analysis, all led us to the top two spots - of perhaps hundreds of potential sites - to drill
geothermal wells,” Jim Faulds, director of the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology said. “Success at two sites provides an
initial validation of the methodology we developed, and opens up new possibilities for power generation sites by the industry.”
In Gabbs Valley, there is a major subsurface fault intersection. In the Great Basin, most geothermal systems are affiliated with
Quaternary faults, which are faults recognizable at the surface that have moved in the past million years or so, a portion of the
Quaternary time period.
Its gratifying to demonstrate positive results of applied science here
at the Bureau,” Faulds said. “After several years of research, mapping,
and analysis, we’ve identified many promising areas that have great
potential for geothermal power. Funds only allowed for test drilling
at two sites, but there are dozens of other promising sites that I’m
excited about across the region. The two sites, one in southeastern
Gabbs Valley and the other in at northern Granite Springs Valley,
are now ready for industry to decide on their economic viability.”
After determining the best places to drill in 2018, Faulds and his
team worked with a crew from the U.S. Geological Survey to drill a
series of wells across the geothermal system. Six holes were drilled at both the Gabbs and Granite Springs Valley sites.
“We bracketed the system with drilling to better define its size and potential power capacity,” Faulds explained.
The Granite Springs site is not as well defined as Gabbs, and finding the center was harder. More drilling might be
required to pinpoint it, but both systems are quite hot at relatively shallow depths. Gabbs is 255ºF (124ºC) at 500 feet, and
Granite Spring Valley is 203ºF (95ºC) at
similar depths for Granite Springs Valley.
Geochemical data suggest higher tem-
peratures for each site at greater depths.
As part of their analysis, Faulds and
his team used a few basic machine-
learning techniques during the project.
They have plans to increase this effort
where they will apply artificial intelli-
gence and machine-learning tech-
niques to geothermal exploration to
identify previously unrecognized con-
nections between the various datasets.
“This is like icing on the cake of our
very successful geothermal play fairway
project,” Faulds said. “This new project
is aimed at facilitating additional discov-
eries of geothermal systems in Nevada
using machine-learning methods and
builds on our previous efforts on geo-
thermal play fairways in the region.”
Editor’s Note: In between our print issues,
the
WWDR
WWDR Team prepares an electronic
newsletter called
E-News Flash
E-News Flash.
Based on readership, this was the most
popular
E-News Flash
E-News Flash article of the month.
Get in on the action and subscribe today
at: www.worldwidedrillingresource.com
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AUGUST 2019
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GE
O
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AUGUST 2019
Water Wells Aer the Flames
Adapted from Information by the Water Systems Council
and the Montana Department of Environmental Quality
Wildfires can happen anywhere in the world. If you live in an area affected by wildfires, it’s important for your customers
to know what to do after the flames are gone. Until water tests can confirm no contaminants are in the water, well owners
should not drink or cook with the water. In fact, well owners shouldn’t touch
or turn on any equipment until the system is inspected by a professional.
Underground components like the pump may be fine; however, the
entire well system needs to be inspected for damage, such as:
Wellhead - casing, cap or seal, and aboveground piping
• Tank - pressure or storage tanks (cisterns)
Electrical - wires and control box
• Treatment - filters/housing, tanks, chemicals
Well houses - equipment such as chlorinators, filters, or controls
Vents and overflow pipes
Only a licensed well contractor should make repairs and determine if
the well needs shock chlorination or disinfection after repairs are made.
Be sure to remind well owners the shock chlorination/disinfection process
will not remove metals, pesticides, or other types of nonbiological contam-
ination. Don’t forget to check water treatment systems which may have
also suffered damage.
At a minimum, water testing should consist of ammonia, bacteria, nitrate, sulfate, and turbidity. However, well owners
should also consider testing for iron, metals (arsenic, copper, lead, mercury, zinc), pH, phosphorus, and salts (boron, chloride,
sodium) as these contaminants are commonly found in well water following wildfire incidents.
Don’t forget, a fire close to the well or upgradient (higher) in the watershed may cause the water to taste earthy, smoky,
or burnt. You may want to reassure customers this is to be expected and isn’t likely to cause a direct health threat. The water
lines should be thoroughly flushed.
WTR
W
ell owners may be overwhelmed when returning after a
wildfire. Many won’t consider checking their well. As a water
well professional, you have knowledge to make a difference.
Photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Phelps.
42
AUGUST 2019
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Drilling Into Money Not Boring
b
y Mark E. Battersby
Vehicles = Moving Deductions
Thanks to the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, those drilling professionals with vehicles in their business
are finding it easier than ever to write off the cost of buying and maintaining them. The 2019 tax year
began with new deductible mileage rates for vehicle usage. According to the Internal Revenue Service,
the standard deduction rate for using a car, van, pickup, or panel truck for business purposes is 58 cents
per mile, up 3.5 cents from 2018.
While every drilling operation and business, at least those with fewer than five vehicles, can use the business standard
mileage rate, using the actual cost of operating a vehicle or vehicles for business purposes is frequently more advantageous.
W
hen it comes to writing off the cost of passenger autos, trucks, and vans, there are caps on the amount which can be
deducted under the so-called “luxury” car depreciation rules. For passenger automobiles, the depreciation limits for the first
three years are $10,100, $16,100, and $9700 respectively, and $5760 for each succeeding year.
Passenger automobiles, for which the Section 179 first-year expensing rules apply, have limits for the first three years of
$18,100, $16,100, and $9700 - with
$5760 allowed each succeeding year.
The rules for the Section 179 expens-
ing means the cost of qualified vehicles
and other property which can be
expensed in 2019 is $1 million (up from
the earlier $510,000 limit). However,
the $1 million limit phases out once
total investments for the year exceed
$2.5 million.
There is also a silver bullet called
“bonus depreciation.” For 2019, bonus
depreciation applies to 100% of the
cost of qualified property, whether new
or used - with no limit. Despite the new
generous dollar limits, expensing con-
tinues to be limited to the drilling opera-
tion’s taxable income.
Many drilling businesses are also
eligible to claim a tax credit or a refund
for gasoline, diesel fuel, or kerosene,
used in nontaxable, off-road applications.
A federal excise tax of 18.4 cents per
gallon is imposed on gasoline, and clear
diesel fuel of 24.4 cents per gallon.
Many drilling-related businesses
must live, and in many cases suffer,
with today’s tax laws - especially the
deduction limits for cars, vans, light
trucks, and SUVs. Or, they might be
able to write off a portion of the vehi-
cle’s purchase price, but guidance by a
qualified professional is always strongly
recommended.
Mark
Mark E. Battersby may be contacted
via e-mail to michele@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
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AUGUST 2019
The Bible is the most
shoplifted book.
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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®
The Future of Tire Management -
Intelligent Tires
A
dapted from Information by Continental
Take a step into the future of tire man-
agement with the ContiEarthintelligent
tires, saving the need for extensive manual
checks, and optimizing the life of your tires.
Continental combines its strength in the
automotive and rubber sector to present its
intelligent tire as an essential part of the ContiEarth™ range of RDT-Master and EM-Master tires.
If the inflation pressure of a tire decreases, the tire might be subject to greater strain as it rolls,
causing it to heat up, which can damage the tire or even lead to a blowout. Each tire of the
ContiEarth™ range comes with an integrated sensor, which is able to constantly monitor inflation
pressure, as well as tire temperature, and can transmit the information in real time to the
ContiPressureCheck™ system.
The ContiPressureCheck™ system is a direct measurement system fitted directly into the tire.
It combines sensors with a communication and processing system to form a single module which
is contained inside a rubber container and glued to the inner surface of the tire. This system has
several advantages over sensors placed outside the tire. It avoids measurement errors due to heat
radiation of the brakes, and it is quick and easy to install, as well as robust and reliable.
Data is sent wirelessly to the central receiver, which processes the data, saves warnings, and
sends them directly to the display in the driver’s cabin or to a hand-held device. Continuous tire
monitoring will reduce tire-related breakdowns and vehicle downtimes, which increases the effi-
ciency of the vehicle and the fleet as a whole.
The Continental RDT-Master is designed for rigid dump trucks, which transport heavy loads
over long distances in rough terrain. In these severe conditions, tires have to offer high stability and
good traction. The tires also need to be extremely resistant to cut and tear. The RDT-Master’s spe-
cial tread design with a deep tread depth and wide, flat tread radius offers high loading capacity
and cutting resistance. Maximum traction is guaranteed even on winding terrain and while driving
at high speeds. Furthermore, the open tread design results in excellent self-cleaning characteristics.
At construction or mining sites, articulated dump trucks, loaders, and dozers are used for transporting large quantities of
bulk or aggregate material, ranging from soft and muddy soil, to gravelly and rocky terrain. Durability, excellent traction, and
superior resistance to rock cutting and heat generation are essential to operate in these extreme conditions. Continental’s
EM-Master is customized for these specific demands, and is available in two versions with different tire tread designs.
Sensor, cabin display,
and hand-held display.
C
&
G
44
AUGUST 2019
Everett cont’d from page 25.
lizes. Unfortunately, we are often criti-
cized because of the water level fluctu-
ations recorded during the first few
minutes of pumping, and are asked
w h a t w a s w r o n g w i t h t h e d a t a
recorders. Nothing - just more data
than we have ever seen misinterpreted
as aquifer response rather than system
function.
Ed
Ed Everett may be contacted
via e-mail to michele@
worldwidedrillingresource.com
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Tales from the Field
by Jeremy C. Wire
G
eoconsultants, Inc.
The Well that “Walked”
In drilling a particularly deep water well, it is customary to drill a straight, vertical borehole with as little deviation
from vertical as possible. However, in some geologic settings, its not easy to accomplish this task, even when carefully
watching weight on the bit during rotation and taking other precautionary measures. When the geology is horizontally
layered, perhaps consisting of sandstone and interbedded shale, keeping a vertical borehole may be relatively easy, but where dipping
layers are concerned, along with other geologic conditions in the borehole, the bit may tend to wander off course, and work its way
in the up-dip direction of the layers.
An example of this situation occurred in a geologic setting of a sandstone and shale sequence where a deep exploratory test hole for
a well had a planned depth of around 1000 feet. The borehole diameter was 8-3/4 inches and would be reamed out for a small-diameter
casing and screen section for a production well if warranted. The test hole was in a relatively small basin, near a major fault where granitic
rock was exposed on one side with a dipping sandstone and shale sequence on the other side, not too far away from the location.
There were no particularly difficult drilling conditions, with mostly shale being encountered to a depth of about 700 feet. Then
sandstone with minor amounts of shale was easily penetrated, continuing to the planned depth of about 1000 feet, where hard
granitic rock apparently should have been reached, but was not found. It was decided to drill ahead since borehole conditions were
favorable, and this was still an exploratory test hole.
Drilling continued first to 1400 feet, then 1800 feet, then to slightly over 2000 feet in depth, all in what appeared to be water-bearing sand-
stone. Not wanting to court any bad luck, drilling was stopped at this point. There was some indication the borehole had drifted, based on some
difficulty in making trips in and out for bit changes, but no serious sticking” problems occurred. Since this test hole for a well was by far the
deepest drilled in the area, in addition to the usual downhole geophysical logs, it was decided to run a dipmeter survey throughout the length of
the borehole. This type of log would determine the dip of the sandstone and shale formation, as well as the drift amount from the vertical, and
the direction of borehole along its entire length. The borehole was nearly vertical to a depth of about 1400 feet, but at this point it started deviating
as much as 30 degrees from the vertical, or slightly more, to the bottom of the hole. In addition, sandstone layers were indicated to be inclined
as much as 40 degrees in the direction of the bit. As far as could be determined, the bit was drifting in the up-dip direction of the bedding.
The test hole was reamed out, there not being a serious attempt to straighten it in the deviated section, and six-inch steel casing
with mill slots was installed to a total depth of slightly below 2000 feet. As far as we know, the well is still producing today, and for
those of us who worked on the project, it is still referred to as the well that “walked”.
Jeremy Jeremy Wire may be contacted via e-mail to michele@worldwidedrillingresource.com
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We Buy and Sell All Makes & Models
of Cable Tool Rigs!
Wanted BE models 24L, 28L, 36L , 60L
NEW Twin Disc clutches and
other product lines.
New shock kit assemblies for
BE cable tool rigs.
***
NEW Smeal / Hunke Pump Hoist***
Buy / Sell Used Pump Hoists - All Makes!
740-408-0725 Reese Rig & Tool
305-982
(2) 55 SpeedStars, and Alten 32A, 24A.
Call for price on rigs.
269-209-5594 or
E-mail: cablewelldriller42@yahoo.com
Ray Leonard, Battle Creek, MI USA
305-170
Hocker Drilling and Fishing Tools
Special Price on Cable Tools! We
accept Visa & Master Card. New &
Used Cable Tools, Rope Sockets,
Stems, and Bailers. Call 270-926-2889
dhocker2@roadrunner.com
307-107
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WorldWide Drilling Resource
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238-879
238-673
Hydraulic and pneumatic tools in stock.
Sizes 1” to 20”.
Model 113HD
All Hydraulic
Sizes 1"-13"
(208) 365-3492 • Fax: (208) 365-3792
rauchmfg.com
rauchmfg@frontiernet.net
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307-518
Carbide Button Bits
Cable Drilling & Fishing Tools
www.RAMPPCO.com
Worldwide
Manufacturer
of Cable
Drilling Tools
800-272-7886
SEMCO, INC.
All-Hydraulic Hydrorench
S112H in Stock
1-12” Four Rollers
Breaks Pipe, Makes Pipe to Torque Specs
800-541-1562
238-135
October Issue Deadlines!
Space Reservation:
August 25
th
Display & Classified
Ad Copy: September 1
st
Visit us online!
worldwidedrillingresource.com
Sullair 750/250, rebuilt air end...$15,000
Joy WB12 booster/Det. series 60..$50,000
Joy WB12 booster/Det. 12V 92....$60,000
Call Alan Lang: 801-554-2419
335-1027
NEW smooth drill collars w/
IF threads; 30', 20' w/breakout flats,
and 10' long.
JWS Equipment Ph: 405-794-3600
dannystull.jws@gmail.com
425-784
50
AUGUST 2019
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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Drill Collars
425
320-254
TekMark Industries
PVC Cutoff & Torch Guide
DTH Spear - PVC Puller
Heavy Column Pipe Holder
Other Casing Tools
tekmarkwellcasingtools.com
800-747-2485 or 509-747-2485
Internal Casing Lifter 35 Tons
Flush Joint Elevator
Casing Holder 35 Tons
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335-183
R & R DRILLING INC.
800-874-3907
PH. 423-626-5302 FAX. 423-626-1232
E-mail: airdocron1@gmail.com
Schramm Distributor
GHH - RAND
Distributor of Genuine GHH Rand Parts
Distributor of
SULLAIR Compressors
NEW & REBUILT SULLAIR
& GHH COMPRESSORS
SHIPPING WORLDWIDE
Will Ship Worldwide!
Sullair 750/350 to 1350/500
GHH 204/128 and CF 1000
Excellent Exchange Prices!
INGERSOLL-RAND
AIR COMPRESSORS
NEW & REBUILT
HR2s - HR2.5
AIRENDS IN STOCK
401-719
Geoprobe
®
Rentals (420M, 6712DT, 7822DT)
PrePacked Well Screens
Injection Tooling
Vapor Sampling
Manholes (H20, M-306, Aircraft Rated)
Morrison Bros. Co.
®
Johnson Screens
®
Proactive Pumps
®
888-240-4328 609-631-8939 (fax)609-631-0993
ectmfg.com
proactivepumps.com torquerplug.com
S
tocking Distributor of Genuine Geoprobe
®
Tooling & Supplies
435-1213
DRILL PIPE MANUFACTURER
Connections
601-736-6112
INFO@HELANBAK.COM
HELANBAK.COM
a API Reg
a API IF
a FEDP
a & Others
a Mayhew JR
a Mayhew Reg
a AW / AWJ
a NW / NWJ

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Geotechnical, geothermal,
water well, oilfield, grout equipment
& drill pipe for sale.
Call: 270-365-3083 Text: 270-339-0454
Mike Murray
452-873
-WANTED-
20 to 300 hp vertical hollow
shaft pump motors.
Good or Bad! Will pick up!!
800-541-1562
510-135
51
WorldWide Drilling Resource
WorldWide Drilling Resource
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AUGUST 2019
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435-120
$8.00 per line. Classified display (photo, box, logo included) per column inch: 1x $71, 3x $69, 6x $67, 12x $62.
A
Drill Pipe In Stock
2-3/8 x 2-3/8 May. x 20’
2-3/8 x 2-3/8 IF x 20’
2-7/8 x 2-3/8 IF x 20’
3-1/2 x 2-3/8 IF x 20’
3-1/2 x 3-1/2 IF x 20’
4-1/2 x 2-7/8 IF x 20’
4-1/2 x 2-7/8 IF x 25’
5 x 3-1/2 IF x 20’
Weld-On Tool Joints - Used Drill Pipe
Call: RENE HENDON 281-260-0880
renehendon@yahoo.com
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458-814
The Midwest’s Largest Inventory of Drilling Supplies
Drilling Mud - Polymers - PVC and Stainless Steel -
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We deliver to all 50 States - 7 Days a Week! Give us a call!
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Phone: 800-388-2906 Fax: 815-443-2893
E-Mail: mudmen@aeroinc.net
www.iesdrillingsupplies.com
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515-121
ELEVATOR SPECIAL
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DRILLING EQUIPMENT SALES, INC.
2
515 Highway 70 SW • Hickory, NC 28602
828-322-3056
www.drillingequip.com
Package Special